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realkingcobra
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06-08-2009, 10:12 PM

OK, off the phone now now back to where we were. The greater the change between the pocket opening and the back of the pocket means the greater the chance of rejecting the balls from the pocket. Keep in mind there's a difference between a tight pocket and a tuff pocket. A tight pocket is small in the opening, but will take anything fired down the middle, the offset is that you also loose cue ball angle for position when you don't have the room to angle the object ball into the pocket. The farther away from the pocket the less you can play off angle for position. Now on the other hand, a tuff pocket is one that the object balls are going in the pockets by first coming off the facings, then into the pocket, such as shooting a ball down the rails into the corner pocket. A 4" corner pocket with 46 degree angles will accept the balls much easier coming down the rails, than say a 4 1/2" corner pocket with 53 degree angles, because these kind of angles have a tendency to force the object balls across the pocket to the opposing facing then back out again, short or deep shelf, it don't really matter.

With Brunswick Gold Crowns, starting with the GC1's all the way up to the GC5's the pocket castings all have the same width across the back of the corner pockets, so how did they have some corner pockets with 5" opening, and some with 4 3/4"....by changing the pocket angles that's how, from 55 degrees down to 53 degrees. The GC5's with the "PRO" pockets are 4 9/16" and use a 52 degree pocket angle. So take the pocket opening and subtract the throat 2" back, the greater the number the more rejective the pocket is going to be.

Facings play a major role in rejecting balls from pockets as do cushions. Take the Olhausen tables for example. The cushions are very...very soft, the facings are 1/8" and very soft. What happens on an Olhausen table is that when you're attempting to pocket a ball in the corner pocket coming down the rails, you're shooting the ball right into the outer have of the pocket facing with no rail wood support behind the cushion. When you do this, what happens is that when the ball being pocketed hits the facing, instead of deflecting to-wards the back of the pocket, it compresses the facing and cushion kind of like creating a flat spot at the end of the cushion, which in turn kicks the ball across the pocket to the opposite facing and back out again, and you don't even have to shoot the shot hard to get this "rejection" to happen. So, now comes in the role of the facings. If the soft 1/8" facings are replaced with harder 3/16" neoprene facings, these facings don't compress nearly as much when you shoot a ball into them, so the balls that would normally reject....go in because they deflect off the facings deeper into the back of the pocket.
  
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