Go Back   AzBilliards.com > Instruction & Ask the pros > Aiming Conversation
Reload this Page Ever just lost your game all of a sudden???
Reply
Page 3 of 4 123 4
 
Share Thread Tools Rate Thread
Old
  (#31)
SpiderWebComm
HelpImBeingOppressed
SpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond reputeSpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond reputeSpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond reputeSpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond reputeSpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond reputeSpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond reputeSpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond reputeSpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond reputeSpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond reputeSpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond reputeSpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond repute
 
SpiderWebComm's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 9,998
vCash: 1275
iTrader: 4 / 100%
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wilmington, DE
   
12-06-2017, 07:57 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by BilliardsAbout View Post

This tip is for amateurs playing for MVP league honors or a trophy.

I think it "may" work for some but isn't all that simple. If it's a first time situation, playing for MVP league honors, a trophy, or especially a big TEAM EVENT, is no different at this level as it is for the pros choking like dogs in the Mosconi Cup. Mental takes over the physical. The body is no longer in control.

I teach other techniques in lessons for players deep in competition mode, but this tip works beautifully for lower stakes play.
Do you know what the #1 fear is for most people? The fear of public speaking with a lot of strangers in the audience. Sure, you can pretend all you want that you're talking to a small group of friends, people you know well in a social gathering, classmates or other situations. But when someone new to the situation of public speaking gets in front of a sea of strange faces while on stage for the first time, reality sets in and it's a different story.

The legs are tremulous along with the entire body, the voice quivers, and the brain doesn't work to remember what is to be said even when prepared. If unprepared or unrehearsed, it usually turns into a nightmare.

That's why most people don't put themselves there to begin with.

All you have to do is watch a pro PGA golf tournament every week on the final two days and you'll see certain players fold like a napkin all the time. And even top players do it. They flinch while putting and their coordination or balance goes all to hell when hitting drives and iron shots that get them in big trouble.

Out of curiosity, are you a licensed psychologist or psychiatrist?


*******************


Viffer: The Movie
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_JFIy2ebJIE
  
Reply With Quote

Old
  (#32)
SpiderWebComm
HelpImBeingOppressed
SpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond reputeSpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond reputeSpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond reputeSpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond reputeSpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond reputeSpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond reputeSpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond reputeSpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond reputeSpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond reputeSpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond reputeSpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond repute
 
SpiderWebComm's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 9,998
vCash: 1275
iTrader: 4 / 100%
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wilmington, DE
   
12-06-2017, 08:05 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by BasementDweller View Post
I'm going to chime in here because I've been in these shoes and you can beat this if you really want to.

There's been some good advice in this thread and some not so good. But let me back up...

I'm the most nervous player you will ever meet! I thought I had a normal level of nervousness until I started talking to other decent players and I now realize that I'm off the charts. To be honest, I've even realized now -- through conversations with my wife that I even have an unhealthy level of anxiety in my everyday life. I guess I've lived with it for so long that I thought it was normal. When it comes to tournament play for me, if I got any more nervous/anxious I would probably get close to experiencing a panic attack. So it's pretty bad...

BUT

I've figured out how to deal with it. Here's my recipe.

1. Don't do any pretending. Don't picture the audience naked. Don't act like it doesn't matter. Don't picture yourself all alone in your basement playing. Instead -- embrace the nervousness. It might feel like you're falling off a weekend long cliff but at least you know you're living. The nervousness can be used to play your best pool so you really don't want to eliminate all of it.

2. Exercise and Breathing. In between racks stretch out. Go for a fast walk to the bathroom. Jump up and down. Do whatever you can do without having everybody in the facility think you're a mad man. Do this to burn off some of that nervous energy. Then focus on your breathing trying to calm down your heart rate.

3. Have realistic expectations. YOU ARE GOING TO MISS! When you do try not to let it defeat you. Learn from the mistake you made and move on.

4. PSR. This is vitally important to work on DURING your practice time before the tournament but when it comes time to play you really shouldn't be talking through your PSR every shot. Instead just focus on the most simple thing like staying absolutely still. Or have one single thought that you focus on. Think "statue" or "smooth" or some other single thought.

This really has worked for me so I felt I would share. This past weekend I played the best pool of my life and I'm hoping I finally have it figured out. I played some great pool against some National Champions and managed to win the Grand Rapids Open so these steps aren't just theories for me but I've applied them successfully in events.

Good luck.

***Edit***
Maybe you weren't even specifically talking about nerves here but I think others were.
Now this is some good stuff and on the money. Kudos for all the honesty, especially to yourself first.

One other thing I'd like to add to it. As uncomfortable, scary, or embarrassing as it is or has been in the past, CONTINUE TO PUT YOURSELF IN THOSE SITUATIONS AS OFTEN AS POSSIBLE TO GET USED TO IT AND LEARN HOW YOUR MIND AND BODY REACTS AND WHAT NEEDS TO BE DONE.


*******************


Viffer: The Movie
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_JFIy2ebJIE
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#33)
Neil
AzB Silver Member
Neil has a reputation beyond reputeNeil has a reputation beyond reputeNeil has a reputation beyond reputeNeil has a reputation beyond reputeNeil has a reputation beyond reputeNeil has a reputation beyond reputeNeil has a reputation beyond reputeNeil has a reputation beyond reputeNeil has a reputation beyond reputeNeil has a reputation beyond reputeNeil has a reputation beyond repute
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 17,290
vCash: 2200
iTrader: 2 / 100%
Join Date: Jan 2007
   
12-06-2017, 08:13 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by BasementDweller View Post
I'm going to chime in here because I've been in these shoes and you can beat this if you really want to.

There's been some good advice in this thread and some not so good. But let me back up...

I'm the most nervous player you will ever meet! I thought I had a normal level of nervousness until I started talking to other decent players and I now realize that I'm off the charts. To be honest, I've even realized now -- through conversations with my wife that I even have an unhealthy level of anxiety in my everyday life. I guess I've lived with it for so long that I thought it was normal. When it comes to tournament play for me, if I got any more nervous/anxious I would probably get close to experiencing a panic attack. So it's pretty bad...

BUT

I've figured out how to deal with it. Here's my recipe.

1. Don't do any pretending. Don't picture the audience naked. Don't act like it doesn't matter. Don't picture yourself all alone in your basement playing. Instead -- embrace the nervousness. It might feel like you're falling off a weekend long cliff but at least you know you're living. The nervousness can be used to play your best pool so you really don't want to eliminate all of it.

2. Exercise and Breathing. In between racks stretch out. Go for a fast walk to the bathroom. Jump up and down. Do whatever you can do without having everybody in the facility think you're a mad man. Do this to burn off some of that nervous energy. Then focus on your breathing trying to calm down your heart rate.

3. Have realistic expectations. YOU ARE GOING TO MISS! When you do try not to let it defeat you. Learn from the mistake you made and move on.

4. PSR. This is vitally important to work on DURING your practice time before the tournament but when it comes time to play you really shouldn't be talking through your PSR every shot. Instead just focus on the most simple thing like staying absolutely still. Or have one single thought that you focus on. Think "statue" or "smooth" or some other single thought.

This really has worked for me so I felt I would share. This past weekend I played the best pool of my life and I'm hoping I finally have it figured out. I played some great pool against some National Champions and managed to win the Grand Rapids Open so these steps aren't just theories for me but I've applied them successfully in events.

Good luck.



***Edit***

Maybe you weren't even specifically talking about nerves here but I think others were.
Chris, a big, fat, congratulations!!! on knocking off that tourney!

This year was the biggest field to date in the upper division.
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#34)
SpiderWebComm
HelpImBeingOppressed
SpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond reputeSpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond reputeSpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond reputeSpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond reputeSpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond reputeSpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond reputeSpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond reputeSpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond reputeSpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond reputeSpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond reputeSpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond repute
 
SpiderWebComm's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 9,998
vCash: 1275
iTrader: 4 / 100%
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wilmington, DE
   
12-06-2017, 09:00 AM

Jay Helfert describes exactly what happens in one of his latest posts. Probably what happened to the OP of this thread if he honestly analyzes it in retrospect.

I can personally attest to what Jay wrote.

Jay's Post:

"To elaborate on what happened to Skylar. It can happen to any pool player when they lose their confidence, becoming fearful and having performance anxiety. Your body goes numb and you can't feel anything when you get down to shoot. Every shot becomes a challenge, even the most simple ones. Momentarily you have literally forgotten how to play. It's like being temporarily paralyzed. Same reason that some people freeze up in a crises. I feel bad for Skylar that he had to experience this at the worst possible time. I had it happen to me before (playing Petey Margo) and just wanted the match to end."


*******************


Viffer: The Movie
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_JFIy2ebJIE
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#35)
nobcitypool
AzB Silver Member
nobcitypool has a reputation beyond reputenobcitypool has a reputation beyond reputenobcitypool has a reputation beyond reputenobcitypool has a reputation beyond reputenobcitypool has a reputation beyond reputenobcitypool has a reputation beyond reputenobcitypool has a reputation beyond reputenobcitypool has a reputation beyond reputenobcitypool has a reputation beyond reputenobcitypool has a reputation beyond reputenobcitypool has a reputation beyond repute
 
nobcitypool's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 2,831
vCash: 500
iTrader: 38 / 100%
Blog Entries: 1
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Noblesville, IN
   
12-06-2017, 11:27 AM

Obviously, there is a psychological side. But I think fundamentals have a ton to do with it. If you have a home brewed stroke that relies a lot on timing, you're more likely to have problems in pressure situations. Everyone is susceptible to pressure to some degree or another. The more fundamentally sound a player is including their PSR, stroke, pattern play, etc., the more likely they are to stand up under pressure.

I also think it has a lot to do with how you practice. Does your practice consist of banging balls and often rushing through the shot process or do you have structured practice where you maintain your PSR, you have drills where you measure results (creating some pressure to perform) and do you work on your weaknesses instead of your strengths?

Pool is a game of micro inches, degrees, etc.. The difference between a clean shot and a horrible miss isn't feet or even inches. Being off hitting the CB 1/4 tip vertically or horizontally can alter the outcome of the shot substantially. It doesn't take much pressure or jitters for that to happen.


Playing Cue: Jensen with Revo 12.4 Shaft
Break Cue: OB Rift
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#36)
BC21
Poolology

BC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond repute
 
BC21's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 1,462
vCash: 500
iTrader: 2 / 100%
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: West Virginia
   
12-06-2017, 08:18 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by nobcitypool View Post
Obviously, there is a psychological side. But I think fundamentals have a ton to do with it. If you have a home brewed stroke that relies a lot on timing, you're more likely to have problems in pressure situations. Everyone is susceptible to pressure to some degree or another. The more fundamentally sound a player is including their PSR, stroke, pattern play, etc., the more likely they are to stand up under pressure.

I also think it has a lot to do with how you practice. Does your practice consist of banging balls and often rushing through the shot process or do you have structured practice where you maintain your PSR, you have drills where you measure results (creating some pressure to perform) and do you work on your weaknesses instead of your strengths?

Pool is a game of micro inches, degrees, etc.. The difference between a clean shot and a horrible miss isn't feet or even inches. Being off hitting the CB 1/4 tip vertically or horizontally can alter the outcome of the shot substantially. It doesn't take much pressure or jitters for that to happen.

Excellent post. Quality of practice is very important. It should be goal-oriented, a challenge that isn't impossible to achieve, but also isn't too easy to achieve. The brain learns best when pushed toward a goal that has a realistic/good chance of being met. But when it's too easy, nothing new is being added, which means no learning is happening. When the goal is too tough, very unlikely to be achieved, your brain is learning more about failure than success. There is a sweet spot for practice where the brain gets just enough of a glimpse of success that it sees the goal and knows very well it is reachable. Once reached, set a slightly higher goal next time.

I also like the comment (I believe from Spider) about putting yourself in pressure situations more often. This seasons you up quite well. Allows you to pull yourself together when needed, like BasementDweller did in that Grand Rapids 8ball open.


POOLOLOGY
Brian Crist
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#37)
fathomblue
Rusty Shackleford
fathomblue has a reputation beyond reputefathomblue has a reputation beyond reputefathomblue has a reputation beyond reputefathomblue has a reputation beyond reputefathomblue has a reputation beyond reputefathomblue has a reputation beyond reputefathomblue has a reputation beyond reputefathomblue has a reputation beyond reputefathomblue has a reputation beyond reputefathomblue has a reputation beyond reputefathomblue has a reputation beyond repute
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 1,521
vCash: 500
iTrader: 1 / 100%
Blog Entries: 2
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Conway, Arkansas
   
12-06-2017, 09:19 PM

Have you attempted to play an actual match while not worrying about the outcome?

My advice.....simply stop trying. As in, just play. Smile. Have fun. Just to see what happens. You're already losing. Why beat yourself up about it? Your inner self knows what you're capable of and have done in the past. So, just approach the table on every shot with a positive attitude. Never let that positive vibe waver, no matter what happens after every turn.

Let us know what happens.


Justin Wray

Main Player: Gary Johnson custom 4-pointer w/Ki-tech "hard" tip
Back-up Player: Gary Johnson custom Sneaky Pete w/Ki-Tech "hard" tip
Breaker: Gary Johnson custom "Snowflake" 4-pointer
Jumper: Steve Lomax custom w/silver rings
Retired: Meucci 333-5
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#38)
Mkindsv
AzB Silver Member
Mkindsv has a reputation beyond reputeMkindsv has a reputation beyond reputeMkindsv has a reputation beyond reputeMkindsv has a reputation beyond reputeMkindsv has a reputation beyond reputeMkindsv has a reputation beyond reputeMkindsv has a reputation beyond reputeMkindsv has a reputation beyond reputeMkindsv has a reputation beyond reputeMkindsv has a reputation beyond reputeMkindsv has a reputation beyond repute
 
Mkindsv's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 164
vCash: 500
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: North Texas
   
12-06-2017, 11:32 PM

Had a decent week this week in league...got some good practice in beforehand. Played my 9 ball match and won 5-3 in a 5-4 race. Lost 8 ball, couldn't make a shot again, this was about two hours after the nine ball match. I have come to a conclusion as to why I am having such difficulties, or at least a large part of the reason, and it is exhaustion.

I work nights 6 pm to 6 am, Wed-Sat and then Wed-Sun the following week. I signed up for a league on Mondays, since it is in the middle of my days off, problem is, if it is my day off my wife thinks its a good idea to have me run errands from 6 am to 5 pm pretty much every single day, which is fine, but playing pool til 2 am after doing that is getting difficult.

Anyway, I have taken most of the suggestions posted here to the table,thing is, when I practice it is at a reasonable hour and I literally have no issues...it is literally night and day.

My problem previously was PRESSURE, only for one tournament, that was the reason for the original post, pretty sure my problem now is that the hours aren't numerous enough in the day to get enough rest and still play pool on Monday Nights. I am going to do an experiment and go in the next three weeks with just a ton of rest and see how much that helps.

Thanks all for your suggestions, you are all truly appreciated!!!
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#39)
Mkindsv
AzB Silver Member
Mkindsv has a reputation beyond reputeMkindsv has a reputation beyond reputeMkindsv has a reputation beyond reputeMkindsv has a reputation beyond reputeMkindsv has a reputation beyond reputeMkindsv has a reputation beyond reputeMkindsv has a reputation beyond reputeMkindsv has a reputation beyond reputeMkindsv has a reputation beyond reputeMkindsv has a reputation beyond reputeMkindsv has a reputation beyond repute
 
Mkindsv's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 164
vCash: 500
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: North Texas
   
12-06-2017, 11:35 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by fathomblue View Post
Have you attempted to play an actual match while not worrying about the outcome?

Let us know what happens.
I rarely ever worry about wins or losses while playing league, the way the handicapping system is set up, if you play by the rules you are going to lose your fair share for sure. When I start going off the rails is after three or four games of not playing how I know I can play...not really anger, more befuddlement.
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#40)
BilliardsAbout
Billiards.About.com
BilliardsAbout has a reputation beyond reputeBilliardsAbout has a reputation beyond reputeBilliardsAbout has a reputation beyond reputeBilliardsAbout has a reputation beyond reputeBilliardsAbout has a reputation beyond reputeBilliardsAbout has a reputation beyond reputeBilliardsAbout has a reputation beyond reputeBilliardsAbout has a reputation beyond reputeBilliardsAbout has a reputation beyond reputeBilliardsAbout has a reputation beyond reputeBilliardsAbout has a reputation beyond repute
 
BilliardsAbout's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 1,086
vCash: 500
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Gainesville, FL
   
12-07-2017, 05:57 AM

Sometimes I theorize on my posts, other times I'm citing what works with students.

Not every tip or technique applies to every player. Most "pretend" keys are designed to distract the verbal mind during athletic competition so the body can move well.

If "just breathing clearly" works for you, great. If not, try my tip. Then, let me know. If it doesn't work, I will give you a free lesson so we can find something that does work for you.


-- Matt Sherman

Guide to Pool and Billiards, About.com
Instruction Staff, InsidePool Magazine
Author, book/DVD combo, Picture Yourself Shooting Pool
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#41)
BasementDweller
AzB Silver Member
BasementDweller has a reputation beyond reputeBasementDweller has a reputation beyond reputeBasementDweller has a reputation beyond reputeBasementDweller has a reputation beyond reputeBasementDweller has a reputation beyond reputeBasementDweller has a reputation beyond reputeBasementDweller has a reputation beyond reputeBasementDweller has a reputation beyond reputeBasementDweller has a reputation beyond reputeBasementDweller has a reputation beyond reputeBasementDweller has a reputation beyond repute
 
Status: Online
Posts: 2,920
vCash: 500
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Join Date: Jul 2009
   
12-07-2017, 08:05 AM

I just don't understand why anybody would want to pretend that something that matters to them doesn't matter. Isn't this the whole point of competing? If you like experiencing the thrill of victory, you have to put yourself in a place where you just might experience the agony of defeat instead.

I think one needs to dig a little deeper psychologically than just pretending. How about visualizing the absolute worst case scenario? You fail miserably. You dog ball after ball. What would your life look like afterwards? Your loved ones will still care about you. Your friends will still be there although they may not want you on their team in the future. Your dog won't care at all. Maybe there will be rumblimgs behind your back about how bad you dogged it. Realizing the worst case scenario isn't the end of the world can remove some of this self-imposed pressure and maybe it will help you (all of us) be a little less judgmental about the play of others.

The other thing about competition is it helps us identify our true skill level. Many of us aren't as good as we think we are. The missed shots that we shrugg off in practice and think "Oh I could have made that easy one", their true difficultly is revealed during battle. Being an 80 percent favorite to make a shot in practice is not good enough in competition. This is often learned the hard way.


●●●Thanks Neil for the congrats●●●

Last edited by BasementDweller; 12-07-2017 at 08:08 AM.
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#42)
BasementDweller
AzB Silver Member
BasementDweller has a reputation beyond reputeBasementDweller has a reputation beyond reputeBasementDweller has a reputation beyond reputeBasementDweller has a reputation beyond reputeBasementDweller has a reputation beyond reputeBasementDweller has a reputation beyond reputeBasementDweller has a reputation beyond reputeBasementDweller has a reputation beyond reputeBasementDweller has a reputation beyond reputeBasementDweller has a reputation beyond reputeBasementDweller has a reputation beyond repute
 
Status: Online
Posts: 2,920
vCash: 500
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Join Date: Jul 2009
   
12-07-2017, 08:11 AM

Maybe it's just how I'm wired. I guess I'm just a glutton for punishment because as much as I fight with my nerves, at the same time I desire the rush of overcoming them.
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#43)
SpiderWebComm
HelpImBeingOppressed
SpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond reputeSpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond reputeSpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond reputeSpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond reputeSpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond reputeSpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond reputeSpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond reputeSpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond reputeSpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond reputeSpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond reputeSpiderWebComm has a reputation beyond repute
 
SpiderWebComm's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 9,998
vCash: 1275
iTrader: 4 / 100%
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wilmington, DE
   
12-07-2017, 08:51 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by BasementDweller View Post
Maybe it's just how I'm wired. I guess I'm just a glutton for punishment because as much as I fight with my nerves, at the same time I desire the rush of overcoming them.
I think it proves good things can happen to those who get out of the "basement" and out of the house to the Roman Colosseum where lions and tigers are trying to eat you. You might have to change your screen name.

Agreed about pretending. Well trained and constantly trained police officers work on simulators as well as other officers to prepare for life threatening shoot outs.

But it's also well documented when bullets start flying within milliseconds of an attack as the adrenaline takes over and the heart rate hitting 175+, pi$$ing their pants is not at all uncommon as well as being very inaccurate with their own shots. That is fact!

Congratulations on the win.


*******************


Viffer: The Movie
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_JFIy2ebJIE
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#44)
Neil
AzB Silver Member
Neil has a reputation beyond reputeNeil has a reputation beyond reputeNeil has a reputation beyond reputeNeil has a reputation beyond reputeNeil has a reputation beyond reputeNeil has a reputation beyond reputeNeil has a reputation beyond reputeNeil has a reputation beyond reputeNeil has a reputation beyond reputeNeil has a reputation beyond reputeNeil has a reputation beyond repute
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 17,290
vCash: 2200
iTrader: 2 / 100%
Join Date: Jan 2007
   
12-07-2017, 09:57 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by BasementDweller View Post
I just don't understand why anybody would want to pretend that something that matters to them doesn't matter. Isn't this the whole point of competing? If you like experiencing the thrill of victory, you have to put yourself in a place where you just might experience the agony of defeat instead.

I think one needs to dig a little deeper psychologically than just pretending. How about visualizing the absolute worst case scenario? You fail miserably. You dog ball after ball. What would your life look like afterwards? Your loved ones will still care about you. Your friends will still be there although they may not want you on their team in the future. Your dog won't care at all. Maybe there will be rumblimgs behind your back about how bad you dogged it. Realizing the worst case scenario isn't the end of the world can remove some of this self-imposed pressure and maybe it will help you (all of us) be a little less judgmental about the play of others.

The other thing about competition is it helps us identify our true skill level. Many of us aren't as good as we think we are. The missed shots that we shrugg off in practice and think "Oh I could have made that easy one", their true difficultly is revealed during battle. Being an 80 percent favorite to make a shot in practice is not good enough in competition. This is often learned the hard way.


●●●Thanks Neil for the congrats●●●
Good post. Years ago, I learned a valuable lesson, and freed myself forever of contendorosis. That lesson was simply to see the bigger picture. No matter how this match turns out, the sun is still going to come up tomorrow.

And, in an amazingly short amount of time, nobody but my opponent and myself is likely to remember who won. So don't make a bigger deal out of it than it really is. Just play your game to the best of your ability, and see where you stand with it. That's all we really can ask of ourselves.

That said, now use your win as proof that you can do it. A real confidence builder. And that belief will greatly lessen any future anxiety.
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#45)
BC21
Poolology

BC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond repute
 
BC21's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 1,462
vCash: 500
iTrader: 2 / 100%
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: West Virginia
   
12-07-2017, 01:09 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by BasementDweller View Post
Maybe it's just how I'm wired. I guess I'm just a glutton for punishment because as much as I fight with my nerves, at the same time I desire the rush of overcoming them.
I like when I get nervous, when my hands begin to shake a little and my heart feels like it's pounding to get out. This usually helps me slow down. A few deep breaths help regain a sense of control over the situation. I say "usually" because last weekend I ignored my nerves and tried to push forward so I wouldn't appear nervous. My opponent hooked me on the 7, playing 9ball, and I baby masséd around the 8 to pocket the 7. Now I'm straight on the 8, long shot but straight in. Shoot and stop and I'm dead on the 9. I wasn't nervous at all until I got down on that 8. Then I thought, 'make this then break and run two racks and you win this thing.' Instead of acknowledging my nerves and standing back up to deal with it, I shot the 8 and rattled it. 2nd place was good money, but I failed to give myself a chance at 1st.

Overcoming our own egos is one of the toughest things to to do. It's ok to admit you're nervous as hell, as long as you cope with it and don't ignore it.

Congrats on your big win!


POOLOLOGY
Brian Crist
  
Reply With Quote
Reply
Page 3 of 4 123 4

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.