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peppersauce
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12-13-2017, 07:00 AM

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Originally Posted by FranCrimi View Post
Your video shows that you are a decisive player; and I like the fact that you don't waste time mulling over decisions. Your rhythm around the table is moderately fast. Slowing down your pace a little for one or two shots after you've been distracted is fine. Don't slow down a lot and don't do it for more than a couple of shots. It will obliterate your rhythm.

If you're competing and feel leery about picking up the pace again after you lost your rhythm and slowed down a bit, give yourself permission to miss a shot or two in order to find your rhythm. Losing your rhythm for the rest of the match is way worse than sacrificing a couple of shots to get it back.

That trick was taught to me by an old pool hustler who played out of Jimmy Fusco's home room in Philly named Peter Rabbit. Once Peter told me it was okay to miss to find my rhythm again, it felt like a load was lifted from my shoulders. And the funny thing was that once I gave myself permission to miss, although I did miss sometimes, I often didn't miss, I guess because there wasn't the tension that there was before.

Just remember: Playing out of your rhythm is exhausting. It will wear you down both mentally and physically. You'll start to make bad decisions and execute poorly. It's also important to find your rhythm right from the start of the match, and that includes allowing yourself to miss a shot or two early on to find it. If you can shoot a rack or two before your match, use that time to find your rhythm. Everything else will fall into place.
Thanks, Fran. I learned something new today and Iím definitely going to experiment with this. What you said here makes so much sense I donít know why no one else has ever said it to me. My wife is a player and she has told me things like, ďYou didnít play like yourself in that match.Ē Or, ďYou looked like you were thinking too much.Ē But she never could really elaborate or recommend a course of action.

Being a slow starter is something Iíve delt with since I started playing. Generally, I donít play my best in tournaments, especially shorter races, and this could very well be why. My best game comes out playing multiple sets back-to-back, long races, or ahead sets. Itís not uncommon for me to lose the first couple of sets badly or get 7-8 games behind in an ahead set right out of the gate before I loosen up and just do what I do.

Again, thanks Fran. And thanks to everyone else that responded as well. I appreciate it!
  
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FranCrimi
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12-13-2017, 08:24 AM

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Originally Posted by peppersauce View Post
Thanks, Fran. I learned something new today and I’m definitely going to experiment with this. What you said here makes so much sense I don’t know why no one else has ever said it to me. My wife is a player and she has told me things like, “You didn’t play like yourself in that match.” Or, “You looked like you were thinking too much.” But she never could really elaborate or recommend a course of action.

Being a slow starter is something I’ve delt with since I started playing. Generally, I don’t play my best in tournaments, especially shorter races, and this could very well be why. My best game comes out playing multiple sets back-to-back, long races, or ahead sets. It’s not uncommon for me to lose the first couple of sets badly or get 7-8 games behind in an ahead set right out of the gate before I loosen up and just do what I do.

Again, thanks Fran. And thanks to everyone else that responded as well. I appreciate it!
Happy to help. I'm very much like you --- sensitive to distractions and a slow starter. A friend who knows my game really well once told me that my strong game kicks in after the 2nd hour, and after the 6th hour, I'm deadly. Well heck, that wasn't going to help me one bit in tournaments so I started focusing on finding my rhythm early, and it really helped a lot. Most people don't think about how they move from shot to shot. That's why you haven't heard about this before. It's not something that's talked about a lot.

Also, playing a slow player, or if there's a lot of safety play in a match ---- these are things that can knock you out of your rhythm. Just focus on playing at your own pace and ignore everything else.


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Last edited by FranCrimi; 12-13-2017 at 08:35 AM.
  
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12-21-2017, 05:42 PM

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Originally Posted by peppersauce View Post
So, essentially, you all would teach it to stay loose, relaxed, use it as some form of mental trigger to move from looking/decision making/chalking into the shooting portion of a psr, get a feel for the grip and balance of the cue before shooting, etc...or something along those lines. Am I close?

All of that makes sense to me. The player recommended I take a minimum of 3-5 air strokes on every shot to improve speed control. That really doesnít make sense to me. I view speed control as something thatís developed in training. If a person is lacking in that area, air stroking isnít a magic fix.

I certainly wasnít going to debate it with this player though. He is obviously much better than I am and if he believes it helps him in that respect...it probably does. The first thing that came to mind for me was the laundry list of European players who donít air stroke at all...mostly professional snooker players, but Iíve also noticed a decent number of European pool players who donít incorporate air strokes into their psr either.

Do you all feel my thought process is sound? I just really want other knowledgeable points of view on the subject in case Iím dismissing the idea too quickly. Thanks for the responses, btw!
I agree with you a bit on this, I also to a degree agree with the pro player's advice.

I use the air strokes after finding the shot as a initial step to visualize making the shot and obtaining the shape I want to have. Also, especially if it is a shot I have hit a thousand times, you can use the motion to visualize your delivery speed. Think "Good stroke, nice speed" or "that gets me where I want to go" even while air stroking in visualizing your shot, if you are herky-jerky with it, you are going to subconsciously make adjustments.
  
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Michael S
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12-23-2017, 10:57 AM

I find myself doing this. this helps me to visualize the speed needed for the shot. I know this looks silly but it really helps.
  
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02-15-2018, 12:38 PM

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Originally Posted by FranCrimi View Post
A good player is always on the move, stalking the table, inspecting it from different angles.
Just watch Ralf Souquet play if you want to see a perfect example of this.

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