eye patterns
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eye patterns - 12-20-2017, 12:50 PM

a good player i know has this eye pattern
your thoughts on the pros /cons
at address he makes sure the cue tip is where he wants it to be on the cue ball
and makes sure the aim is on for his target
he then focuses completely on the contact point on the object ball
during his warm up strokes/set/ /pull back/pause/ and finish
is that an acceptable pattern??
(it seems to work for him )
  
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FranCrimi
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12-20-2017, 01:38 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by bbb View Post
a good player i know has this eye pattern
your thoughts on the pros /cons
at address he makes sure the cue tip is where he wants it to be on the cue ball
and makes sure the aim is on for his target
he then focuses completely on the contact point on the object ball
during his warm up strokes/set/ /pull back/pause/ and finish
is that an acceptable pattern??
(it seems to work for him )
No. That's like shooting in the blind. Taking all your warmup strokes without checking your aim at some point is risky. That player may as well have shut his eyes during the final stroke. It would be the same thing. I call it Russian roulette pool when a player does that.


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goettlicher
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12-20-2017, 03:08 PM

I won't teach that eye pattern.

If it works for him, so it may be.

It's not very natural!

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12-21-2017, 07:32 AM

Fran, Randy..


What do you recommend? I sometimes struggle with this, should I move my eyes from ob and cb while taking practice strokes or should I be locked on to the CB?

Better yet what are you doing and looking at when your down on the shot?

As always thanks for your help.
  
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SFC9ball
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12-21-2017, 08:35 AM

Eye patterns can be tricky.

This is what I teach:

1. settle into your shot
2. confirm your aim (Cue stick not moving)
3. look at the cue ball take your practice strokes (stop the cue stick)
4. transfer your eyes back to the object ball find your spot on the ball
5. back, pause, finish

This is just part of a PSR. I believe in the KISS method and try to simplify everything in can in this complex game.


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E-mail: 1jbcuerepair@gmail.com
  
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12-21-2017, 09:52 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by SFC9ball View Post
Eye patterns can be tricky.

This is what I teach:

1. settle into your shot
2. confirm your aim (Cue stick not moving)
3. look at the cue ball take your practice strokes (stop the cue stick)
4. transfer your eyes back to the object ball find your spot on the ball
5. back, pause, finish

This is just part of a PSR. I believe in the KISS method and try to simplify everything in can in this complex game.
fran and randy thank you for your responses
jim
whats your opinion of the person after #2 just looking at the contact point on the object ball while doing your #3 then on to 5
  
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SFC9ball
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12-21-2017, 10:31 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by bbb View Post
fran and randy thank you for your responses
jim
whats your opinion of the person after #2 just looking at the contact point on the object ball while doing your #3 then on to 5
It is bad because when you get your tip close to the cue ball you can hit it while looking at the object ball and moving your cue at the same time. I teach my student to get he cue tip as close as possible without touching the cue ball when addressing it. 1/4 to 1/2 inch is good this allows for minimal error in striking the cue ball with precision.

1 MM off is your intended spot on the cue ball can be the difference in making or missing the ball, drawing you ball back 6 inches or 12 or missing optimal position on in a critical spot.

It is the small things that make a big difference in this game.


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12-22-2017, 01:53 PM

Excellent description Jim! Remember, we show them 3 different PEP's, and let them choose which one might work best for them. Then they have to ingrain the eye pattern into their shooting PSR. It's certainly true that the huge majority of players trying to incorporate a consistent eye pattern into their routine seem to prefer the one you described (PEP #1). I know I do...Pops does...and a whole lot more! LOL

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Quote:
Originally Posted by SFC9ball View Post
Eye patterns can be tricky.

This is what I teach:

1. settle into your shot
2. confirm your aim (Cue stick not moving)
3. look at the cue ball take your practice strokes (stop the cue stick)
4. transfer your eyes back to the object ball find your spot on the ball
5. back, pause, finish

This is just part of a PSR. I believe in the KISS method and try to simplify everything in can in this complex game.


PBIA Master Instructor
  
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Scott Lee
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12-22-2017, 01:54 PM

+1

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Quote:
Originally Posted by SFC9ball View Post
It is bad because when you get your tip close to the cue ball you can hit it while looking at the object ball and moving your cue at the same time. I teach my student to get he cue tip as close as possible without touching the cue ball when addressing it. 1/4 to 1/2 inch is good this allows for minimal error in striking the cue ball with precision.

1 MM off is your intended spot on the cue ball can be the difference in making or missing the ball, drawing you ball back 6 inches or 12 or missing optimal position on in a critical spot.

It is the small things that make a big difference in this game.


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FranCrimi
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12-22-2017, 07:09 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by evis View Post
Fran, Randy..


What do you recommend? I sometimes struggle with this, should I move my eyes from ob and cb while taking practice strokes or should I be locked on to the CB?

Better yet what are you doing and looking at when your down on the shot?

As always thanks for your help.
I make sure I pause the tip at the cue ball at least a couple of times when I'm getting ready to shoot. I will usually take a couple of practice strokes and then pause and look. It's during that pause when I check my alignment by making sure the shaft of my cue is properly aligned to the line I want it to be on. That means that I look from my shaft to the cue ball to the object ball and back during that pause. I don't do it while the cue stick is in motion. Only when it's paused at the cue ball.

Then when I'm ready, I shift my gaze to the object ball and keep it there as I begin my backstroke for the final stroke. Some players prefer to shift their gaze while they're stroking. I find that distracting.


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12-23-2017, 08:29 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by SFC9ball View Post
Eye patterns can be tricky.

This is what I teach:

1. settle into your shot
2. confirm your aim (Cue stick not moving)
3. look at the cue ball take your practice strokes (stop the cue stick)
4. transfer your eyes back to the object ball find your spot on the ball
5. back, pause, finish

This is just part of a PSR. I believe in the KISS method and try to simplify everything in can in this complex game.


Great eye pattern.

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question - 12-26-2017, 11:10 AM

Is #5 backswing, pause and hit all looking at the spot on the object ball?

thanks
Quote:
Originally Posted by SFC9ball View Post
Eye patterns can be tricky.

This is what I teach:

1. settle into your shot
2. confirm your aim (Cue stick not moving)
3. look at the cue ball take your practice strokes (stop the cue stick)
4. transfer your eyes back to the object ball find your spot on the ball
5. back, pause, finish

This is just part of a PSR. I believe in the KISS method and try to simplify everything in can in this complex game.
  
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Scott Lee
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12-26-2017, 11:38 AM

marikian...Maybe, depending on which PEP you ingrain. In the pattern described by Jim Baker, the answer is yes for all three in #5 (which is eyes up before starting the last backswing). For others the eyes might go up to the OB at the pause at the backswing...others may look up as they're bringing the cue back for the last time. Most people that we teach seem to prefer the same pattern Jim described. I know I like that one best...so does randyg, Mark Finkelstein, Tom Seymour, Steve Jennings, Lance Cowles, and many other instructors. The critical thing is to do the same thing, the same way, on every shot.

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Quote:
Originally Posted by marikian View Post
Is #5 backswing, pause and hit all looking at the spot on the object ball?

thanks


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Last edited by Scott Lee; 12-26-2017 at 11:50 AM.
  
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12-26-2017, 11:45 AM

thank you very much

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Lee View Post
marikian...Maybe, depending on which PEP you ingrain. In the pattern described by Jim Baker, the answer is yes for all three in #5 (which is eyes up before starting the last backswing). For others the eyes might go up to the OB at the pause at the backswing...others may look up as they're bringing the cue back for the last time. Most people that we teach seem to prefer the same pattern Jim described. I know I like that one best...so does randyg, Mark Finkelstein, Tom Seymour, Steve Jennings, Lance Cowles, and many other instructors. The critical thing is to do the same thing,
the same way, on every shot.

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12-27-2017, 05:15 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by marikian View Post
Is #5 backswing, pause and hit all looking at the spot on the object ball?

thanks
i see scott answered your question
as i went to look back on eye pattern threads/posts
i found this great post scott lee wrote on eye patterns and quiet eyes
hope this helps
http://forums.azbilliards.com/showpo...5&postcount=10

Last edited by bbb; 12-27-2017 at 05:39 AM.
  
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