Legend of Rambow
Old
  (#1)
Mr. Bond
Orbis Non Sufficit
Mr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond repute
 
Mr. Bond's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 3,935
vCash: 500
iTrader: 1 / 100%
Join Date: Jun 2010
   
Legend of Rambow - 02-09-2011, 10:10 AM

From another thread:

Q: Did Rambow ever produce cues for any company other than Brunswick, Keefe & Hamer, and himself?

A:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Hoppe View Post
If I recall correctly, Herman Rambow worked for Brunswick from 1915 to 1950. During that time, there was one period in which Rambow left Brunswick, created the Hub cue, and was persuaded to return and again work for Brunswick. I don't recall how long that departure was, and I don't know if he simply worked by himself during that time, or worked at another shop. Of course after 1950 Rambow made cues under his own name until his death in 1967. If there was any time that he worked with/for someone else, it would have been during that "sabbatical" from Brunswick before he retired from there and went out on his own. There was also a mentoring relationship between Rambow and Ray Schuler, but I know of no actual cue collaborations that came out of that relationship.

A:
Quote:
Originally Posted by manwon View Post
Herman Rambow left Brunswick and started the Superior Cue Mfg. and Billiard Supply Company in 1921, because he felt that Brunswick was not giving him credit for his idea's. Now between the years of 1921 and 1926 Herman worked on his own, since he left Brunswick and since Brunswick challenged his design of the Hub Cue, Herman had little choice but to sell cues and merchandise either to private individuals or to Brunswick's competition.

In 1925 the dispute between Brunswick and Rambow ended when Herman was awarded a Patent from the US Patent Office (Patent Number 1,527,748), shortly after this also in 1925, Herman signed his Patent Rights over to Brunswick for unknown reason's. Then in 1927 Herman was back working for Brunswick as the Head Foreman for all cue operations, until his retirement in 1950.

During the the Six Year's that Herman worked on his own from 1921 until 1927 documentation of his activities are very scarce, however, cues that were his trade mark appear, made in the same fashion and using the same construction techniques that Herman was known for. One cue style in particular shows up with the name imprints / manufacturing marks of J.E. Came of Boston, and O.L. Briggs Company and that is the Rambow Hub cue. It is certainly possible that these companies purchased these cues from Herman unmarked and that they added their name stamps to them, or it is also possible that they made these cues themselves, however, when you consider that Patent thief was as much a crime then as it is now I would suspect that Herman was involved in some manner. In addition all the Hub Cues I have seen with the Name stamps of other companies appear to have been made during the 1920's, this is due to the location of the weight stamp, and the materials used for joining and building these cues.

Hopefully more information will come to light in the future, and this is the only way to close the book on this conversation.

JIMO

Again - thanks very much for your insight. I will be addressing Herman's time away from Brunswick (highlighted in blue)
  
Reply With Quote

Old
  (#2)
Mr. Bond
Orbis Non Sufficit
Mr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond repute
 
Mr. Bond's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 3,935
vCash: 500
iTrader: 1 / 100%
Join Date: Jun 2010
   
02-09-2011, 12:02 PM

-Has been edited slightly from original post to reflect new information-

While 'growing up' amongst the Brunswick people, it appears that Herman made friends with two brilliant swedish men by the names of Axel F. Hjort and Charles Lindquist. They were designers, inventors and consultants, and in fact, some of Hjort's patents are pretty darn impressive. A few are listed below:

A machine for ornamenting billiard cues
Permanent clips for fastening cloth to slate
A convertable carom-pocket table with " quick crank on-off rails"

Initially I didn't think that Hjort and Lindquist were actually employed by Brunswick, but it turns out that they were, and apparently they worked closely with Herman for many years. (which probably has a lot to do with them leaving Brunswick together)

For whatever reason, Herman did in fact leave Brunswick. He joined up with his swede amigos (funny term) and they worked together for their company:
Superior Cue Manufacturing & Billiard Supply Co. 214 Institue Place, Chicago

Now, when exactly did Rambow leave? Not sure. [edit - his WWI draft card @1916-17 says he still works for BBCC.]
However, in 1922 something very interesting happened. ~Enter the Ninja~

(beginning in 1857) Albert Pick & Co was a very successful producer of institutional and commercial furniture wares. This included such things as bar equipment etc and eventually a line of billiard tables, cues and accessories. To further their furniture interests they also owned a nationwide chain of hotels and motels. The Picks had money and they were powerful people.

And because they were powerful, they knew - when they entered the billiard market against Brunswick it was going to take big guns. So what did they do? They snatched up the most reputable billiard shop crew in town...Herman and the swedes were now employees of Albert Pick & Co.

Name:  1922 July  Rambow and  Albert Pick 2.JPG
Views: 2515
Size:  50.0 KB

Whats interesting is the implication that it could have been the swedes that Rambow actually learned the bulk of his skill from.

Not only that, but it appears that the origin of Rambows reputation as an excellent cue maker actually far preceeds his more recent and well known association with Brunswick and the Titlist.

I can just imagine what happened next: somewhere in some obscure Brunswick corporate office, someone gets a call that they really didnt want to get... ring ring...

" hello? .....yeah hi Bob how are y....wait slow down.....what?...they did what???.....holy sht we have to do something...."

And do something they did. By about 1925 Herman (and the swedes) had somehow been persuaded to not only come back to Brunswick, but to also give up his patents too. That must have been one helluva Christmas bonus.


Doesnt it make you wonder..

somewhere out there is an Albert Pick Rambow Cue?

Last edited by Mr. Bond; 02-10-2011 at 12:52 PM.
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#3)
Mr. Bond
Orbis Non Sufficit
Mr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond repute
 
Mr. Bond's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 3,935
vCash: 500
iTrader: 1 / 100%
Join Date: Jun 2010
   
02-09-2011, 12:09 PM

deleted- I had to pull this and add it to the other post

Last edited by Mr. Bond; 02-10-2011 at 04:48 PM.
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#4)
classiccues
Jeez another trade offer
classiccues has a reputation beyond reputeclassiccues has a reputation beyond reputeclassiccues has a reputation beyond reputeclassiccues has a reputation beyond reputeclassiccues has a reputation beyond reputeclassiccues has a reputation beyond reputeclassiccues has a reputation beyond reputeclassiccues has a reputation beyond reputeclassiccues has a reputation beyond reputeclassiccues has a reputation beyond reputeclassiccues has a reputation beyond repute
 
classiccues's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 12,984
vCash: 1700
iTrader: 53 / 100%
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NJ
   
02-09-2011, 12:37 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Bond View Post
While 'growing up' amongst the Brunswick people, it appears that Herman made friends with two brilliant swedish men by the names of Axel F. Hjort and Charles Lindquist. They were designers, inventors and consultants, and in fact, some of Hjort's patents are pretty darn impressive. A few are listed below:

A machine for ornamenting billiard cues
Permanent clips for fastening cloth to slate
A convertable carom-pocket table with " quick crank on-off rails"

What isnt very clear at this point is the extent or depth of these swedes' relationship with Brunswick. They did sell their patents to Brunswick, that much is clear, but evidence suggests that, unlike Herman, they weren't actually "employed" by Brunswick at all....they may have already been in business for themselves....it will make more sense in a minute.

For whatever reason, Herman did in fact leave Brunswick. He joined up with his swede amigos (funny term) and they worked together for their company:
Superior Cue Manufacturing & Billiard Supply Co. 214 Institue Place, Chicago

Now, when exactly did Rambow leave? Not sure.
However, in 1922 something very interesting happened. ~Enter the Ninja~

(beginning in 1892) Albert Pick & Co was a very successful producer of institutional and commercial furniture wares. This included such things as bar equipment etc and eventually a line of billiard tables, cues and accessories. To further their furniture interests they also owned a nationwide chain of hotels and motels. The Picks had money and they were powerful people.

And because they were powerful, they knew - when they entered the billiard market against Brunswick it was going to take big guns. So what did they do? They snatched up the most reputable billiard shop crew in town...Herman and the swedes were now employees of Albert Pick & Co.

Attachment 171268

What's interesting is the implication that these men had been in business together for FORTY YEARS? How long could Rambow have worked for them?
Whats also interesting is the implication that it was with the swedes, not with Brunswick, that Rambow actually would have received the bulk of his skill building experience...

Not only that, but it appears that the origin of Rambows reputation as an excellent cue maker actually far preceeds his more recent and well known association with Brunswick and the Titlist.

I can just imagine what happened next: somewhere in some obscure Brunswick corporate office, someone gets a call that they really didnt want to get... ring ring...

" hello? .....yeah hi Bob how are y....wait slow down.....what?...they did what???.....holy sht we have to do something...."

And do something they did. By 1925 Herman had somehow been persuaded to not only come back to Brunswick, but to also give up his patents too. That must have been one helluva Christmas bonus.


Doesnt it make you wonder..

somewhere out there is an Albert Pick Rambow Cue?
Thats very interesting. His first patent is for knurling a handle, and it shows how far we have come in the world of cues.

JV


www.classiccues.com
New site ONLINE.......

Many new cases

Updated 3/29

Trade opportunity: I am trying to fulfill someones collection. I need a Palmer Model I from the second catalog, and a Palmer 18, from the third catalog. If you have either of these, we can possibly do something.

Premium Custom Cues for Sale and Vintage Billiard and Pool Exchange on Facebook....
  
Reply With Quote
Man, this is some great history brother!!!!
Old
  (#5)
hunger strike
AzB Silver Member
hunger strike has a reputation beyond reputehunger strike has a reputation beyond reputehunger strike has a reputation beyond reputehunger strike has a reputation beyond reputehunger strike has a reputation beyond reputehunger strike has a reputation beyond reputehunger strike has a reputation beyond reputehunger strike has a reputation beyond reputehunger strike has a reputation beyond reputehunger strike has a reputation beyond reputehunger strike has a reputation beyond repute
 
hunger strike's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 936
vCash: 750
iTrader: 20 / 100%
Join Date: Jul 2009
   
Man, this is some great history brother!!!! - 02-10-2011, 07:44 AM

Thank you so much for presenting this information. Many collectors have been wondering about this. You have done us all a favor sir.


"I don't mind stealin' bread from the mouths of decadence.... but I can't feed on the powerless, when my cup's already over-filled"
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#6)
Mr. Bond
Orbis Non Sufficit
Mr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond repute
 
Mr. Bond's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 3,935
vCash: 500
iTrader: 1 / 100%
Join Date: Jun 2010
   
02-10-2011, 12:37 PM

Follow up information:

"Famous for Forty Years" What does that mean?

Its not that "Superior Cue" was famous for 40 years of service, because it only existed for a short time. The statement about being famous is simply pointing out the fact that Herman and the swedes had worked together (and were well known) previously for many decades. (at Brunswick)

But the truth of the matter is, Rambow himself was only about 40 at the time, so technically he was the newbie. It was the swedes that had actually been around 40 years.

Again - it seems to be a fairly clear answer as to where -or from whom- Herman learned his cue mastery.

Last edited by Mr. Bond; 02-11-2011 at 10:03 AM.
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#7)
Mr. Bond
Orbis Non Sufficit
Mr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond repute
 
Mr. Bond's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 3,935
vCash: 500
iTrader: 1 / 100%
Join Date: Jun 2010
   
02-11-2011, 09:47 AM

When exactly did Rambow leave Brunswick...?
(and when was the company "Superior Cue Mfg " born)

1910 - From census records we know that Rambow was in Chicago and we know that his buddy Hjort was in Chicago. Presumably both working for Brunswick at the time.

1918- Rambow in Chicago, and according to WWI draft card, still works for Brunswick.

1919 - During this period, something changed.
Hjort has moved to Michigan...
Rambow appears to have quit working for Brunswick...

1920 - Hjort can now be found in Muskegon Michigan working at the Brunswick factory there.
Rambow is still in Chicago, but the census appears to say that he is a painter.

Name:  1920 census rambows job.JPG
Views: 2123
Size:  14.2 KB

Since he isnt working for Brunswick, perhaps he took a painters job just to pay the bills?

1921 - It seems to be during this year that Rambow, Hjort and Lindquist created the Superior Cue Co. News of their business probably spread around town fairly quickly, prompting Albert Pick to take advantage of the situation.

UPDATE: This snippet was found in the October 1921 Billiards Magazine: (considering a possible 1 month delay of the news being published) This would place the creation of the new company in September or early October 1921.
Name:  20160108_130933~2.jpg
Views: 279
Size:  55.8 KB

This snippet was found in the Dec 1921 Billiards Magazine:
Name:  Herman Rambow Dec 1921.jpg
Views: 279
Size:  92.3 KB


1922 - aprox July - Superior Cue Manufacturing is 'bought out' by Albert Pick & Co.

1923 - Chicago directory says: Rambow, Herman - billiard mngr. (this would presumably be for Pick)

conclusion: Rambow left Brunswick aprox 1919. Superior formed aprox Sept-Oct 1921.

Last edited by Mr. Bond; 01-08-2016 at 11:19 PM.
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#8)
Mr. Bond
Orbis Non Sufficit
Mr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond repute
 
Mr. Bond's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 3,935
vCash: 500
iTrader: 1 / 100%
Join Date: Jun 2010
   
02-11-2011, 10:42 AM

I also wonder what he painted...

and what is the word next to painter on the census...lol....

left side is for "job". right side is supposed to be for what "industry".

an example might be: cue maker / sporting goods

Last edited by Mr. Bond; 02-11-2011 at 10:48 AM.
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#9)
DogsPlayingPool
"What's in your wallet?"
DogsPlayingPool has a reputation beyond reputeDogsPlayingPool has a reputation beyond reputeDogsPlayingPool has a reputation beyond reputeDogsPlayingPool has a reputation beyond reputeDogsPlayingPool has a reputation beyond reputeDogsPlayingPool has a reputation beyond reputeDogsPlayingPool has a reputation beyond reputeDogsPlayingPool has a reputation beyond reputeDogsPlayingPool has a reputation beyond reputeDogsPlayingPool has a reputation beyond reputeDogsPlayingPool has a reputation beyond repute
 
DogsPlayingPool's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 8,296
vCash: 500
iTrader: 8 / 100%
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Left Coast
   
02-11-2011, 11:08 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Bond View Post
I also wonder what he painted...

and what is the word next to painter on the census...lol....

left side is for "job". right side is supposed to be for what "industry".

an example might be: cue maker / sporting goods
The word on the right seems to read "fixture".


"It's not enough that you just have talent, you gotta have character too." - Eddie Felson
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#10)
Mr. Bond
Orbis Non Sufficit
Mr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond repute
 
Mr. Bond's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 3,935
vCash: 500
iTrader: 1 / 100%
Join Date: Jun 2010
   
02-11-2011, 12:38 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by DogsPlayingPool View Post
The word on the right seems to read "fixture".
You know, thats what I have always thought. It just doesnt make all the sense in the world. A painter at a fixture company? I guess its possible but its a little odd.
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#11)
manwon
"WARLOCK 1"
manwon has a reputation beyond reputemanwon has a reputation beyond reputemanwon has a reputation beyond reputemanwon has a reputation beyond reputemanwon has a reputation beyond reputemanwon has a reputation beyond reputemanwon has a reputation beyond reputemanwon has a reputation beyond reputemanwon has a reputation beyond reputemanwon has a reputation beyond reputemanwon has a reputation beyond repute
 
manwon's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 14,185
vCash: 4100
iTrader: 68 / 100%
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Near the Cascade Mountains
   
02-11-2011, 06:30 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Bond View Post
-Has been edited slightly from original post to reflect new information-

While 'growing up' amongst the Brunswick people, it appears that Herman made friends with two brilliant swedish men by the names of Axel F. Hjort and Charles Lindquist. They were designers, inventors and consultants, and in fact, some of Hjort's patents are pretty darn impressive. A few are listed below:

A machine for ornamenting billiard cues
Permanent clips for fastening cloth to slate
A convertable carom-pocket table with " quick crank on-off rails"

Initially I didn't think that Hjort and Lindquist were actually employed by Brunswick, but it turns out that they were, and apparently they worked closely with Herman for many years. (which probably has a lot to do with them leaving Brunswick together)

For whatever reason, Herman did in fact leave Brunswick. He joined up with his swede amigos (funny term) and they worked together for their company:
Superior Cue Manufacturing & Billiard Supply Co. 214 Institue Place, Chicago

Now, when exactly did Rambow leave? Not sure. [edit - his WWI draft card @1916-17 says he still works for BBCC.]
However, in 1922 something very interesting happened. ~Enter the Ninja~

(beginning in 1857) Albert Pick & Co was a very successful producer of institutional and commercial furniture wares. This included such things as bar equipment etc and eventually a line of billiard tables, cues and accessories. To further their furniture interests they also owned a nationwide chain of hotels and motels. The Picks had money and they were powerful people.

And because they were powerful, they knew - when they entered the billiard market against Brunswick it was going to take big guns. So what did they do? They snatched up the most reputable billiard shop crew in town...Herman and the swedes were now employees of Albert Pick & Co.

Attachment 171268

Whats interesting is the implication that it could have been the swedes that Rambow actually learned the bulk of his skill from.

Not only that, but it appears that the origin of Rambows reputation as an excellent cue maker actually far preceeds his more recent and well known association with Brunswick and the Titlist.

I can just imagine what happened next: somewhere in some obscure Brunswick corporate office, someone gets a call that they really didnt want to get... ring ring...

" hello? .....yeah hi Bob how are y....wait slow down.....what?...they did what???.....holy sht we have to do something...."

And do something they did. By about 1925 Herman (and the swedes) had somehow been persuaded to not only come back to Brunswick, but to also give up his patents too. That must have been one helluva Christmas bonus.


Doesnt it make you wonder..

somewhere out there is an Albert Pick Rambow Cue?


Thanks for adding this information, I appreciate the time this type of research requires.

Where did you find the association between Superior Cue Mfk and Albert Pick Company?

Thanks Craig


Best Regards

"Warlock 1"

Craig W. Rittel
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#12)
DogsPlayingPool
"What's in your wallet?"
DogsPlayingPool has a reputation beyond reputeDogsPlayingPool has a reputation beyond reputeDogsPlayingPool has a reputation beyond reputeDogsPlayingPool has a reputation beyond reputeDogsPlayingPool has a reputation beyond reputeDogsPlayingPool has a reputation beyond reputeDogsPlayingPool has a reputation beyond reputeDogsPlayingPool has a reputation beyond reputeDogsPlayingPool has a reputation beyond reputeDogsPlayingPool has a reputation beyond reputeDogsPlayingPool has a reputation beyond repute
 
DogsPlayingPool's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 8,296
vCash: 500
iTrader: 8 / 100%
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Left Coast
   
02-11-2011, 07:14 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Bond View Post
You know, thats what I have always thought. It just doesnt make all the sense in the world. A painter at a fixture company? I guess its possible but its a little odd.
I thought so too, wondering if it was a lamp/lighting company or something. Perhaps it was just a more commonly used word back then (like five & dime or apothecary), and was meant to include furniture, cabinets, etc. i.e. furnishings and fixtures.


"It's not enough that you just have talent, you gotta have character too." - Eddie Felson
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#13)
Mr. Bond
Orbis Non Sufficit
Mr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond repute
 
Mr. Bond's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 3,935
vCash: 500
iTrader: 1 / 100%
Join Date: Jun 2010
   
02-11-2011, 07:45 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by manwon View Post
Thanks for adding this information, I appreciate the time this type of research requires.

Where did you find the association between Superior Cue Mfk and Albert Pick Company?

Thanks Craig
Youre more than welcome, it was my pleasure.

The announcement I posted appeared in the July 1922 edition of Billiards Magazine.

Just prior to 1920 Albert Pick was facing a dilema. They produced large quantities of bar equipment - but prohibition was on the way in and they knew it. They needed to shift their production to other things like soda fountains and billiard room goods.

At the end of the 1910s and in the early 20's Pick & Co saturated the market with all things billiards, trying to achieve a Brunswick-like status. (Hence the aggresive move to acquire Herman and the swedes.)

Alas, their power-plays made no difference in the end. Herman left anyway, and the billiard market crashed anyway.

...and the rest, as they say, is history
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#14)
Mr. Bond
Orbis Non Sufficit
Mr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond reputeMr. Bond has a reputation beyond repute
 
Mr. Bond's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 3,935
vCash: 500
iTrader: 1 / 100%
Join Date: Jun 2010
   
02-12-2011, 12:19 PM

An interesting question:

This was published in the Chicago Tribune Feb 6, 1968:

[Herman]...got his start on the road to cue making fame in 1922 when on a rush order he turned out a stick for World Champion Alfredo De Oro.


1. De'Oro didnt play any major tourneys in Chicago in 1922. Why would he have been in Chicago, in desperate need of a cue?

He did play a match in Milwaukee in January. Perhaps he bolted to Chicago for a new cue?

2. Rambow, as previously discussed, didn't work for Brunswick at the time.
If the story is even true, DeOro would have purchased his cue from Superior Cue Mnfg...or Albert Pick.

3. Again, if the story is even true, Rambow didn't "start" getting famous in 1922, he was already famous by 1922.

Last edited by Mr. Bond; 03-10-2011 at 01:02 PM.
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#15)
Rich93
A Small Time Charlie
Rich93 has a reputation beyond reputeRich93 has a reputation beyond reputeRich93 has a reputation beyond reputeRich93 has a reputation beyond reputeRich93 has a reputation beyond reputeRich93 has a reputation beyond reputeRich93 has a reputation beyond reputeRich93 has a reputation beyond reputeRich93 has a reputation beyond reputeRich93 has a reputation beyond reputeRich93 has a reputation beyond repute
 
Rich93's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 1,383
vCash: 4100
iTrader: 3 / 100%
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Chicago area
   
02-13-2011, 04:04 AM

Mr. Bond probably already replied to this in another thread, but Rambow did work for a firm other than Brunswick, and that was Keefe & Hamer, a billiard supply company located at 17 N. Wabash in Chicago. He made cues in the large backroom of their store. I'm not sure when he started to work for them, but for sure it was after he retired from Brunswick. I met him at Keefe & Hamer in 1964 or 1965 when he made a cue for me.

When I ordered the cue I didn't get to talk to him. My impression was that the K&H people kept him away from customers to the extent they could and kept him hard at work in the backroom. However, when I went to pick up the cue he was the only one in the store and I got to meet him then. He brought me back into his shop and started talking, and didn't stop for a half hour or so. I understood then why the K&H people kept him locked away.

I was only 16 or 17 and my memory of that conversation is pretty hazy, but he told me about making cues for Mosconi and other greats of the game. He showed me a cue that was in for repair - Mr. P.K. Wrigley's cue. He talked about how his eyesight was still very strong, how he checked a cue for straightness (sighted down the cue), how he still played very well (with his grandchildren). I believe he also advised me to use fine steel wool on the shaft instead of sandpaper. He showed me some of his equipment that I believe he said he made himself. I wish I could play back that conversation - I'd appreciate it a lot more today.

Anyway, he seemed like a very nice man. He was well into his 80's when I met him and he died a couple of years later. I wish I still had that cue but I sold it when I gave up pool for college. I do remember it cost $50 and came with two shafts - had my name on the butt and my initials on the shafts. It would be worth a few thousand today, I'm sure.



Name: Rich Klein
Cue: Bobby Hunter
Case: JB Cases
Favorite Poolroom: www.redshoesbilliards.com
  
Reply With Quote
Reply
Page 1 of 4 1 23 Last »

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.