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View Full Version : Why is Southwest a SOUTHWEST


Monto P2
08-11-2008, 07:47 AM
Just would like share views with fellow sw owners and azers.what according to you makes southwest cues what they are today:D

A Proud Sw owner

corvette1340
08-11-2008, 07:49 AM
First.....

Would you like to sell the Southwest that you just won in that raffle?
Congrats, by the way.

Monto P2
08-11-2008, 08:10 AM
Not at all.I made a big mistake by selling by prev sw.I wont do it again unless there is an extreme emergency:D

CocoboloCowboy
08-11-2008, 08:14 AM
A Southwest Cue is unique as it has a Sugarro Cactus engraved in it Pin. I often wonder why Southwest chose to engrave the Sugarro Cactus in it's Pin, as the Sugarro Cactus is native to the Sonora Desert of Arizona, and Mexico. Not Las Vegas Nevada where the Southwest Cue are made.

Love the photo of the Sugarro Cactus.










http://www.wadih-ghsoubi.com/Nature/1/original/Burning%20Sunset,%20Saguaro%20National%20Park.%20A rizona.jpg

monchiwai
08-11-2008, 08:21 AM
Just would like share views with fellow sw owners and azers.what according to you makes southwest cues what they are today:D

A Proud Sw owner


Stop showing off! you are making me jealous!! :grin:

Congratz on winning the raffle... and the SW pics you posted were awesome! :thumbup:

Ken_4fun
08-11-2008, 08:26 AM
They make a good cue. But I think the deal is with them is that most people covet what they cannot have.

The rediculous wait, isnt an example of a superior product, but an example of understanding people.

For another example, CLUB 54 in New York, when they would tell most people no you cant come in. Made people want to come in more.

If Southwest would require, 25-50% down (like most cuemakers) then the list would shrink considerably. Most of the cues coming from Southwest hit the market as soon as they come to the owner. I can certainly understand it, you can turn it quickly and make a few bucks with nothing invested long term.

I have bought and sold several, and kept the best one I have ever played with. For someone that wants a good playing cue, it probably is the best bargin out there, for this reason. Buy it for 2000-2500 play with it, and then sell it for about the same amount. Most cues lose value, especially production and lesser known custom makers.

Ken

Monto P2
08-11-2008, 08:36 AM
Stop showing off! you are making me jealous!! :grin:

Congratz on winning the raffle... and the SW pics you posted were awesome! :thumbup:

Thanks Mate:D

Not showing off at all, just sharing opnions:)

$TAKE HOR$E
08-11-2008, 08:36 AM
They make a good cue. But I think the deal is with them is that most people covet what they cannot have.

The rediculous wait, isnt an example of a superior product, but an example of understanding people.

For another example, CLUB 54 in New York, when they would tell most people no you cant come in. Made people want to come in more.

If Southwest would require, 25-50% down (like most cuemakers) then the list would shrink considerably. Most of the cues coming from Southwest hit the market as soon as they come to the owner. I can certainly understand it, you can turn it quickly and make a few bucks with nothing invested long term.

I have bought and sold several, and kept the best one I have ever played with. For someone that wants a good playing cue, it probably is the best bargin out there, for this reason. Buy it for 2000-2500 play with it, and then sell it for about the same amount. Most cues lose value, especially production and lesser known custom makers.

Ken

That is some very good points. I heard recently that Laurie was going to start charging A LOT more for her cues because of the people selling them for about $1000 more than they paid for them, which imo is just good business on everyones part. What I am wondering is if she raises the price on her cues how will that effect the market for them. I can understand spending X number of $$ for one if you are guranteed you can sell it for around $2500 as soon as you get it. Will people still buy them if they are $2000 or $2500 from her. If so does that mean that they will instantly go up to say $3000 or $3500 for the average 6 pointer with veneers and a bem forearm. Just curious as to what people think about this.

SCCues
08-11-2008, 08:40 AM
They make a good cue. But I think the deal is with them is that most people covet what they cannot have.

The rediculous wait, isnt an example of a superior product, but an example of understanding people.

For another example, CLUB 54 in New York, when they would tell most people no you cant come in. Made people want to come in more.

If Southwest would require, 25-50% down (like most cuemakers) then the list would shrink considerably. Most of the cues coming from Southwest hit the market as soon as they come to the owner. I can certainly understand it, you can turn it quickly and make a few bucks with nothing invested long term.

I have bought and sold several, and kept the best one I have ever played with. For someone that wants a good playing cue, it probably is the best bargin out there, for this reason. Buy it for 2000-2500 play with it, and then sell it for about the same amount. Most cues lose value, especially production and lesser known custom makers.

Ken
Ken,

Your analysis of South West cues is right on the money and I couldn't agree with you more. I've owned 5 South West cues with triple veneers and the AB rings and I ended up selling them for what I paid for the cues. I've wished many times that i'd hung on to them and I could make a nice profit in today's market even with the slow economy South West cues like I owned are selling at a premium.

You can buy a South West cue and play with it until you get tired of the cue and then sell it and at least get your money back. There aren't too many cues that you can do that with today.

James

Monto P2
08-11-2008, 08:47 AM
They make a good cue. But I think the deal is with them is that most people covet what they cannot have.

The rediculous wait, isnt an example of a superior product, but an example of understanding people.

For another example, CLUB 54 in New York, when they would tell most people no you cant come in. Made people want to come in more.

If Southwest would require, 25-50% down (like most cuemakers) then the list would shrink considerably. Most of the cues coming from Southwest hit the market as soon as they come to the owner. I can certainly understand it, you can turn it quickly and make a few bucks with nothing invested long term.

I have bought and sold several, and kept the best one I have ever played with. For someone that wants a good playing cue, it probably is the best bargin out there, for this reason. Buy it for 2000-2500 play with it, and then sell it for about the same amount. Most cues lose value, especially production and lesser known custom makers.

Ken

I agree that if they take deposit than list would reduce considerably.

I also feel that 10 years is a very long time,Like i am on the list for few months now,my turn would come in 10 years and by that time i dont know i would be still playing pool or not.so may be i just flip it for a quick buck.How ever now they have changed the system and dont quote prices anymore,they would quote only when ur turn comes and than the current prices of that time would apply.

I feel the playbilty of sw cues is top notch and that is why secondary market is so strong

ScottR
08-11-2008, 10:05 AM
Well.....first off, spelling the name correctly is a great start.

South West

:D

Hidy Ho
08-11-2008, 10:19 AM
Well.....first off, spelling the name correctly is a great start.

South West

:D
Damn it ... beat me to it!!!

suckershot
08-11-2008, 11:05 AM
That is some very good points. I heard recently that Laurie was going to start charging A LOT more for her cues because of the people selling them for about $1000 more than they paid for them, which imo is just good business on everyones part. What I am wondering is if she raises the price on her cues how will that effect the market for them. I can understand spending X number of $$ for one if you are guranteed you can sell it for around $2500 as soon as you get it. Will people still buy them if they are $2000 or $2500 from her. If so does that mean that they will instantly go up to say $3000 or $3500 for the average 6 pointer with veneers and a bem forearm. Just curious as to what people think about this.

FWIW, I thought I'd just seen a post where a guy had posted pics of his new SW with a picture of his invoice from them. Unless he edited the photo of the invoice, I believe the invoice amount was $2200. It was a nice cue, to be sure, but I didn't get the impression that a cue maker would charge $2200 for that cue. So maybe at SW they've already drummed up the prices.

You do bring up an excellent point about what happens to the pricing of cues from SW.

EDIT, add link to thread showing invoice amount: http://forums.azbilliards.com/showthread.php?t=108952

Cuaba
08-11-2008, 11:19 AM
I play with a South West and I fly with it all over the world. I break, jump, and play with one cue. It has remained straight, it plays awesome, and I could sell it for a lot more than I paid for it. The only downside was that it took ten years to get it (ordered in 1993, received in 2003.)

I think the biggest secret to South West cues is the way the wood is selected and dried. Being in Las Vegas, there is little or no humidity. The wood is cut several times over a couple years, and it slowly dries and stabilizes naturally to the dry climate. I think the wood ends up much more stable than kiln dried wood (JMHO.)

That, and great engineering originated by David Kersenbrock, produces a very solid playing cue.

If South West was willing to cut corners, they could fill orders quickly. But they won't, and I commend them for that.

South West is more than just a name. Its a company that produces a cue that is made without compromise.

$TAKE HOR$E
08-11-2008, 12:20 PM
FWIW, I thought I'd just seen a post where a guy had posted pics of his new SW with a picture of his invoice from them. Unless he edited the photo of the invoice, I believe the invoice amount was $2200. It was a nice cue, to be sure, but I didn't get the impression that a cue maker would charge $2200 for that cue. So maybe at SW they've already drummed up the prices.

You do bring up an excellent point about what happens to the pricing of cues from SW.

EDIT, add link to thread showing invoice amount: http://forums.azbilliards.com/showthread.php?t=108952
since that post is so recent then maybe they have already raised their prices. im glad you posted this because i had only heard this but now know it for fact.......

o2bacs
08-11-2008, 01:31 PM
A Southwest Cue is unique as it has a Sugarro Cactus engraved in it Pin. I often wonder why Southwest chose to engrave the Sugarro Cactus in it's Pin, as the Sugarro Cactus is native to the Sonora Desert of Arizona

I think you mean Saguaro because I am unfamiliar with the native Sugarro Cactus lol To stop you from often wondering(don't want you to hurt yourself) I will throw out there that Arizona is in the "Southwest"

GMAC
08-11-2008, 01:59 PM
Just would like share views with fellow sw owners and azers.what according to you makes southwest cues what they are today:D

A Proud Sw owner


IT'S HIT BABY. Plain and simple.

asiasdad
08-11-2008, 02:06 PM
IT'S HIT BABY. Plain and simple.

It's not entirely hit, it is STATUS. I recently sold a wonderfully hitting pre-date South West cue and elected to keep a Judd JT-4. Why? Better hit, for less money in my hands. In someone elses hands, this may not be true.

Monto P2
08-12-2008, 03:08 AM
It's not entirely hit, it is STATUS. I recently sold a wonderfully hitting pre-date South West cue and elected to keep a Judd JT-4. Why? Better hit, for less money in my hands. In someone elses hands, this may not be true.

I agree that statment can be true in many instances.However southwest has a very consistent hit in most of their cues.The balance on the cue is amazing.
I have always said that a 10dollor cue can do what a 2000 dollor cue might not.It is entirely what suits ur playing style.
I have pj olney which hits as good as any cue on this planet.:D

Southwest also is value for money,u play for years and than sell for same price or more.Though the investment is high, but it is secure:D

JimS
08-12-2008, 04:32 AM
It's not a Southwest. Its a South West. Respect dictates that the proper spelling be used.

Edit: I could have read the thread first. This was already said. And, Cuaba... nice post!

HIRUN526
08-12-2008, 05:10 AM
South West....

Perfect timeless design
Excellent craftmanship(consistant from cue to cue)
Excellent history
Awesome people

Plays pretty darn good to.

Worth every dollar spent on a South West Cue.

Murray Tucker
08-12-2008, 11:40 AM
Simple, you can spot one from across the room. Others try but you know the real thing when you see it. Plus they don't play half bad either.

sygfrid
09-08-2008, 02:59 PM
It's not entirely hit, it is STATUS.

I'll toast to that! Even if you can't run-out balls or even if you only win once in a blue moon, having a "show-off" cue with great reputation of performing well (in the right hands) can't destroy the PRIDE of owning such coveted cue :thumbup:


I hope Mrs Franklin will call earlier than 2018... I also hope Mr & Mrs Fuller will answer my emails soon :frown:

Pushout
09-08-2008, 03:15 PM
I had two. Playability and craftsmanship, status means nothing to me or to most people who own them. I seriously doubt I'll ever have the money it takes for one today. I agree that you can buy one, play with it for several years, and resell it for more than you paid for it. I did it with both of mine. I also agree that the way the wood is aged and worked has a ton to do with it.

ugotactionTX
09-08-2008, 03:35 PM
I had no idea they had a wait like that in the early 90's. I thought that teh 10 year wait was a modern convention. I was quoted 7 years about 3 years ago. just wondering



I play with a South West and I fly with it all over the world. I break, jump, and play with one cue. It has remained straight, it plays awesome, and I could sell it for a lot more than I paid for it. The only downside was that it took ten years to get it (ordered in 1993, received in 2003.)

I think the biggest secret to South West cues is the way the wood is selected and dried. Being in Las Vegas, there is little or no humidity. The wood is cut several times over a couple years, and it slowly dries and stabilizes naturally to the dry climate. I think the wood ends up much more stable than kiln dried wood (JMHO.)

That, and great engineering originated by David Kersenbrock, produces a very solid playing cue.

If South West was willing to cut corners, they could fill orders quickly. But they won't, and I commend them for that.

South West is more than just a name. Its a company that produces a cue that is made without compromise.
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