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BrooklynJay
08-11-2008, 08:31 PM
i got through a friend of a friend the wpba code of conduct that was handed out at the players meeting at the last event, the us open.

Complaints
All questions or complaints must be directed privately, in writing, to the tournament director or to a WPBA board member. Any public criticism or complaints are not permitted and the person responsible will be fined ($100.00 up to $5000.00)

Code of Conduct
Players are under scrutiny at all times as a professional and, as such, must avoid behavior that would discredit their fellow professionals, the WPBA, or the sport of billiards.

All players will be responsible for following all rules and regulations as set forth by the WPBA by-laws, the policy handbook, and any other regulations mandated by the on-site tournament officials and hosts.

Members of the WPBA must not make or cause to be made any statements (whether verbal or in writing), or take or cause others to take action which may, in the opinion of the wpba board, bring that member, the wpba or its agents, or the sport of billiards into disrepute.

The wpba may take action against any player member convicted of a felony and restrict their participation in the wpba events.

Player members shall not address criticism of fellow players, tournament personnel, equipment, or facilities to fellow members, the press, or any others. All such complaints should be submitted in writing to the tournament director or to a wpba board member.

Tournament officials may penalize any player abusing rules or regulations of the tournament or code of conduct at their discretion, including calling fouls, awarding games to an opponent, or forfeiting the offending players match.

Code of conduct violations inside the arena- unsportsmanlike conduct, intentional sharking, abusive or profane language, public abuse of equipment-physical or verbal, drinking during a match, rudeness to officials/players/spectators/sponsors, etc.

1. Written warning (verbal inside the arena with a write-up to go in the file)
2. Fine (minimum $100) + possible penalty TBD by tournament official (fouls, loss of game, loss of match.)
3. Fine and suspension

the emphasis added is mine - i highlighted the parts where the wpba wanted to stop players from posting information or their thoughts on here or on other forums concerning "wpba matters" (i.e. the elbow-by situation)

nice huh? wpba...it's faaaaaaaan-tastic.

Johnnyt
08-11-2008, 09:13 PM
First off thank you for this BrooklynJay.

The WPBA has been around how many years? Let's just say thirty year. That's at least 200 tournaments and they handed this out to the players when they did, WHY?

They need to get rid of this board and vote in a new one of players. The new players need to hire someone to advise them in legal matters and sports business dealings. Either this or someone please set up and start another Women's Tour...the players will run to you. Johnnyt

PS. Right after the Sarah E. and Jen Chen thing I said watch the gag order come out fast here. This tour is like watching Washington and it's many cover ups. Classicgate?

SUPERSTAR
08-11-2008, 09:35 PM
Normally, i would say that the board members need to go get laid, but in the case of the WPBA, that doesn't necessarily apply to all.

av84fun
08-11-2008, 09:44 PM
Normally, i would say that the board members need to go get laid, but in the case of the WPBA, that doesn't necessarily apply to all.

Oh it doesn't? Why? Are they all nuns do you think? Not that nuns haven't been known to get a litte here and there.

If your post was an attempt at humor...it was just an attempt IMHO.

Regards,
Jim

9balllvr
08-11-2008, 09:44 PM
i suppose i am in the minority in that i see the attempt by the WPBA to do just what everyone has been griping about for some time, provide a professional based organization/appearance on the women's side of the sport. nothing they have said is anything less than what would be expected in any professional organization. for example, if you are a lawyer, your actions outside of the office are just as crucial as that inside the office...are they not? if you act like a fool in public, would you get business? i don't see the problem here. these women are professionals in their sport, they should act as such. just because there is an avenue to complain publicly doesn't mean you should. that is not to say that if someone witnesses the actions as a spectator, that it won't make the forums anyway. just my unsolicited two cents.

if you want the sport to be recognized in a higher light for potential sponsorship, etc. than it currently is, don't you think that the players should offer them something other than drunken bar brawlers or catty fights between emotionally charged women or men?

av84fun
08-11-2008, 09:48 PM
i got through a friend of a friend the wpba code of conduct that was handed out at the players meeting at the last event, the us open.



the emphasis added is mine - i highlighted the parts where the wpba wanted to stop players from posting information or their thoughts on here or on other forums concerning "wpba matters" (i.e. the elbow-by situation)

nice huh? wpba...it's faaaaaaaan-tastic.

Have you ever read a Code of Conduct for any other sport? Or the canons of ethics that lawyers are obligated to abide by (however unsuccessfully)?

Many such codes speak to behavior in private life. And lawyers are bound not only to avoid impropriety..but the APPEARANCE of inpropriety.

Say what you want about the women's tour organization but at least they HAVE one.

Regards,
Jim

sunnyday
08-11-2008, 10:57 PM
i got through a friend of a friend the wpba code of conduct that was handed out at the players meeting at the last event, the us open.

Members of the WPBA must not make or cause to be made any statements (whether verbal or in writing), or take or cause others to take action which may, in the opinion of the wpba board, bring that member, the wpba or its agents, or the sport of billiards into disrepute.


Oh, by God! I need an interpreter to explain this phrase to me... and I thought my English was pretty descent. Jennifer Chen will need a REAL GOOD Interpreter :shrug:

9balllvr
08-11-2008, 11:10 PM
Oh, by God! I need an interpreter to explain this phrase to me... and I thought my English was pretty descent. Jennifer Chen will need a REAL GOOD Interpreter :shrug:

just tell her it is legal speak :thumbup: it is obvious that it was written up by someone in the legal profession (whether attorney or not).

av84fun
08-11-2008, 11:22 PM
Excellent post. Sadly, too many people would rather see the male pro side continue to deteriorate into small purse regional events with top name players smacking the TD in the forehead for making some ruling.

That really happened in JAX and ALL THIRTY spectators in the room saw it!

(-:

Trust me, there were TWICE as many people standing outside the pro event area smoking and tossing down the brewskis than were watching Thorsten run 167!

But yep....lets knock the most long-lived pro tour organization of the modern era. Maybe we can get the WPBA to disintegrate too so that 30 more people can watch the best female players in the world for 10 bucks in joints all over America.

(-:

Jim

i suppose i am in the minority in that i see the attempt by the WPBA to do just what everyone has been griping about for some time, provide a professional based organization/appearance on the women's side of the sport. nothing they have said is anything less than what would be expected in any professional organization. for example, if you are a lawyer, your actions outside of the office are just as crucial as that inside the office...are they not? if you act like a fool in public, would you get business? i don't see the problem here. these women are professionals in their sport, they should act as such. just because there is an avenue to complain publicly doesn't mean you should. that is not to say that if someone witnesses the actions as a spectator, that it won't make the forums anyway. just my unsolicited two cents.

if you want the sport to be recognized in a higher light for potential sponsorship, etc. than it currently is, don't you think that the players should offer them something other than drunken bar brawlers or catty fights between emotionally charged women or men?

sunnyday
08-11-2008, 11:44 PM
On a serious note...

"Code of conduct violations inside the arena- unsportsmanlike conduct, intentional sharking, abusive or profane language, public abuse of equipment-physical or verbal, drinking during a match, rudeness to officials/players/spectators/sponsors, etc."


If a player commits an unsportmanlike conduct during a match, lets say - Rudeness to Spectators - who calls the violations? Can a spectator who received the rudeness make a complaint?

And if one player acts like a BULLY to another, one must endure the abuse until the match is done and file a written complaint to the Board? Or should they stop in the middle of the shot and look for pen and paper to file a written complaint?

S.

Johnnyt
08-11-2008, 11:55 PM
Excellent post. Sadly, too many people would rather see the male pro side continue to deteriorate into small purse regional events with top name players smacking the TD in the forehead for making some ruling.

That really happened in JAX and ALL THIRTY spectators in the room saw it!

(-:

Trust me, there were TWICE as many people standing outside the pro event area smoking and tossing down the brewskis than were watching Thorsten run 167!

But yep....lets knock the most long-lived pro tour organization of the modern era. Maybe we can get the WPBA to disintegrate too so that 30 more people can watch the best female players in the world for 10 bucks in joints all over America.

(-:

Jim
Watching long runs in 14.1 is like watching cement dry. Guys running 100, 200, or more takes a lot of talent, but it's nothing new. In most cases there is not one eixiting shot in the whole run. It's just not a game to watch for most that have a heart rate over 50 bpm.

Yes the WPBA WAS the best because it is the only real tour. Because it's the only pro tour for women is the only reason the players put up with the way it's run. Let someone or some group start another tour and see how fast they stampede to it. Then you will see how happy most of them are now. That day is not far off. Johnnyt

av84fun
08-12-2008, 12:09 AM
Watching long runs in 14.1 is like watching cement dry. Guys running 100, 200, or more takes a lot of talent, but it's nothing new. In most cases there is not one eixiting shot in the whole run. It's just not a game to watch for most that have a heart rate over 50 bpm.

Yes the WPBA WAS the best because it is the only real tour. Because it's the only pro tour for women is the only reason the players put up with the way it's run. Let someone or some group start another tour and see how fast they stampede to it. Then you will see how happy most of them are now. That day is not far off. Johnnyt

In the same room at the same time there were 10 ball matches going on between such players as SVB, Charlie Williams, Tony Crosby, Mika Immonen, Dennis Orcollo, Stevie Moore, Santos and others...all shooting their hearts out for about 5th place WPBA money.

You obviously have it in for the board but correct me if I am wrong. Isn't the board elected by the players?

Is it really true that there is soon to be a mutiny when the board has recently made it a LOT more likely that the lower ranked players will finish higher these days?

Seems to me that 5 players should be mad and 59 fantastically happy.

We'll see.

Regards,
Jim

Johnnyt
08-12-2008, 12:24 AM
In the same room at the same time there were 10 ball matches going on between such players as SVB, Charlie Williams, Tony Crosby, Mika Immonen, Dennis Orcollo, Stevie Moore, Santos and others...all shooting their hearts out for about 5th place WPBA money.

You obviously have it in for the board but correct me if I am wrong. Isn't the board elected by the players?

Is it really true that there is soon to be a mutiny when the board has recently made it a LOT more likely that the lower ranked players will finish higher these days?

Seems to me that 5 players should be mad and 59 fantastically happy.

We'll see.

Regards,
Jim

There hasn't been large numbers of fans at pool tournaments in years. Those days are gone. Too many other things to do for most people. Yes on TV they get more in the seats because some people will pay to have their face on TV....Hi Mom.

Did the players elect Linda Chen?

I have it in for anyone or group that takes advantage of people. I hate a monopoly.

I will say nothing more about any other tour that might or might not get started. Johnnyt

BrooklynJay
08-12-2008, 04:36 AM
Have you ever read a Code of Conduct for any other sport? Or the canons of ethics that lawyers are obligated to abide by (however unsuccessfully)?

Many such codes speak to behavior in private life. And lawyers are bound not only to avoid impropriety..but the APPEARANCE of inpropriety.

Say what you want about the women's tour organization but at least they HAVE one.

Regards,
Jim

most other sports provide enough money for the players to live on which is why they can dictate their behavior. the wpba does not. in actuality, with the way they have tournies set up running about a week for each event, you have to finish close to 16th or so just to break even. and there's rules here too which actually hurt players. for example - you must stay at the chosen hotel, usually the casino's hotel hosting the event, even if you might be able to find a cheaper place to stay down the street.

as an organization please inform me on how the wpba supports it's members and provides for them i.e. what does being part of this organization do for you as player where they can dictate your outside behavior? do they provide insurance for the players? help them get paid appearances? sponsorships? hell, the wpba can't even update their website in a timely manner. i gotta come here to find out who won matches and who won the events.

BrooklynJay
08-12-2008, 05:02 AM
by the way, did anyone else besides me think it was strange how they addressed leaking "wpba secrets" three or five times but something like, say, elbowing and sharking other players they just addressed once?

nice to know where their priorities are huh?

JimS
08-12-2008, 05:25 AM
Professional organizations as well as organized professionals, require professional behavior. Professional thinking would be nice to go along with it all, but professional behavior is required... REQUIRED.

Just play pool and keep your mouth shut.

sjm
08-12-2008, 05:42 AM
i suppose i am in the minority in that i see the attempt by the WPBA to do just what everyone has been griping about for some time, provide a professional based organization/appearance on the women's side of the sport. nothing they have said is anything less than what would be expected in any professional organization. for example, if you are a lawyer, your actions outside of the office are just as crucial as that inside the office...are they not? if you act like a fool in public, would you get business? i don't see the problem here. these women are professionals in their sport, they should act as such. just because there is an avenue to complain publicly doesn't mean you should. that is not to say that if someone witnesses the actions as a spectator, that it won't make the forums anyway. just my unsolicited two cents.

if you want the sport to be recognized in a higher light for potential sponsorship, etc. than it currently is, don't you think that the players should offer them something other than drunken bar brawlers or catty fights between emotionally charged women or men?

Great post that shows you see the big picture. There are reasons the WPBA is the only American pro pool tour that has stood the test of time, and one of the biggest of them is administrative and operational superiority.

Scott Lee
08-12-2008, 05:54 AM
tap, tap, tap! You're not in the minority. I think everybody here wishes the men could get their act together like the women have. However, it is the same today, as it was 30 years ago. No solid single organization...unlike the women. A group who would rather hustle and gamble than compete (of course, that's a 'catch-22', because they can't make $$$ in tournaments either). Sadly, the "screw the other guy...what's in it for ME?" attitude is just as pervasive today as it was then. There are some men pros who have the right attitude (SVB comes to mind immediately), but they are in the minority! Is this an American problem? Not exclusively, but definitely there are a lot of 'prima donna' pro players here. JMHO

Scott Lee
www.poolknowledge.com

i suppose i am in the minority in that i see the attempt by the WPBA to do just what everyone has been griping about for some time, provide a professional based organization/appearance on the women's side of the sport. nothing they have said is anything less than what would be expected in any professional organization. for example, if you are a lawyer, your actions outside of the office are just as crucial as that inside the office...are they not? if you act like a fool in public, would you get business? i don't see the problem here. these women are professionals in their sport, they should act as such. just because there is an avenue to complain publicly doesn't mean you should. that is not to say that if someone witnesses the actions as a spectator, that it won't make the forums anyway. just my unsolicited two cents.

if you want the sport to be recognized in a higher light for potential sponsorship, etc. than it currently is, don't you think that the players should offer them something other than drunken bar brawlers or catty fights between emotionally charged women or men?

jay helfert
08-12-2008, 10:50 AM
As long as there is even handed enforcement of the rules, then it's all good. But when favoritism and partiality rears it's ugly head, that's when things begin to get very uncomfortable. I think this may be the case in the Ellerby situation that has brought these very strict rules into question.

I do KNOW that many women on the WPBT are unhappy with the interpretation and enforcement of their rules at this time. They just can't say anything publicly, for obvious reasons.

9balllvr
08-12-2008, 11:03 AM
As long as there is even handed enforcement of the rules, then it's all good. But when favoritism and partiality rears it's ugly head, that's when things begin to get very uncomfortable. I think this may be the case in the Ellerby situation that has brought these very strict rules into question.

I do KNOW that many women on the WPBT are unhappy with the interpretation and enforcement of their rules at this time. They just can't say anything publicly, for obvious reasons.

change is always difficult for people and with the cattiness that has been taking place, something needs to be put into play. unless something has changed, there is a player meeting just prior to the events - that is the place to share these types of issues - not everyone has the courage to speak up on an issue in person (face to face) - the written notice to the board is a great outlet for that type of issue, but hiding behind a computer screen makes it much easier to address it in general for some. just seems like they are trying to stop the pettiness in one swoop.

9balllvr
08-12-2008, 11:12 AM
On a serious note...

"Code of conduct violations inside the arena- unsportsmanlike conduct, intentional sharking, abusive or profane language, public abuse of equipment-physical or verbal, drinking during a match, rudeness to officials/players/spectators/sponsors, etc."


If a player commits an unsportmanlike conduct during a match, lets say - Rudeness to Spectators - who calls the violations? Can a spectator who received the rudeness make a complaint?

And if one player acts like a BULLY to another, one must endure the abuse until the match is done and file a written complaint to the Board? Or should they stop in the middle of the shot and look for pen and paper to file a written complaint?

S.

why not do what you would do in any other tournament, get a referee to oversee the match. in life you deal with bullies, how do you handle it? as far as the spectator comment, while playing, the spectator shouldn't even be a thought. is it a "perceived rudeness" to the spectator because i know when i play, the last thing i want to focus on is the person watching me (although sometimes we do) - if you really had an issue as a spectator and could not see past someone's moment of weakness during play, take the time to write the WPBA and notify them of the behavior. stop someone while walking through the halls and let them know to watch the player in the future.

put it into perspective - if you have a desk mate in an office setting that annoys you or does something that is rude, do you report it or just continue to do your job? most people that i know, realize it is part of the work force to have to deal with different personalities (good or nasty) and brush it off. you never know what someone is going through on any given day.

sunnyday
08-12-2008, 05:52 PM
why not do what you would do in any other tournament, get a referee to oversee the match. in life you deal with bullies, how do you handle it? as far as the spectator comment, while playing, the spectator shouldn't even be a thought. is it a "perceived rudeness" to the spectator because i know when i play, the last thing i want to focus on is the person watching me (although sometimes we do) - if you really had an issue as a spectator and could not see past someone's moment of weakness during play, take the time to write the WPBA and notify them of the behavior. stop someone while walking through the halls and let them know to watch the player in the future.

put it into perspective - if you have a desk mate in an office setting that annoys you or does something that is rude, do you report it or just continue to do your job? most people that i know, realize it is part of the work force to have to deal with different personalities (good or nasty) and brush it off. you never know what someone is going through on any given day.

9balllvr,

The WPBA Great Lakes Classic was the first time I attended the WPBA event-I was a spectator. I had never won a qualifier, so this was my first experience and since I am not a WPBA member, I will speak freely...But I like to clarify up front that I have utmost respect for the organization and am a huge fan! So, I was very excited about the opportunity and overall had a ball!

However, this is where the infamous "Ellerby - Elbow-gate" incident had occurred. I did not witness this event, and till this date, it is just an hearsay...

It's easier to say that Jennifer C. should had called a referee from the beginning of the match and have him sat there the whole time since her opponent had history of being rude and dishonest on the table... (this is also hearsay. I do not know for certain how Sarah E. is personally) But with each rounds with several matches going on at once, there are only "two" official referees (Mark Wilson and Steve Tipton) to oversee all the close hits, wracking the balls for few troublesome tables when requested, keeping the audience informed and what ever more... You get the idea! So you can't tie up one of the only two referee for one match...

There were also volunteers working the "shot clock". WPBA has a rule that any match who doesn't clear certain number of games (sorry I forgot the number) within an hour goes on the clock for both players. Even if it was a result of extensive safety play. However, this rule wasn't always consistent since they were at the mercy of having the volunteers available for the match...And overall they just kept the time since they are not qualified referees.

When I was questioning about the rudeness to the spectators on my previous reply, I wasn't worrying about the players having to fade the rude spectator. I was referring to the fact a certain WPBA member - ok, in this case, Sarah E. was being rude to the spectator!

Maybe this guy fidgeted to much or whatever he did, must had irritated her. She got up from her shooting stance and glared at him for few seconds and went back down to shoot.

Ok, I'm a player too and I know that there are some people whom just lack the audience sense and unintentionally sharks you, I KNOW! But any other pros who got sharked usually got up and some even with an apologetic smile, politely asks the audience "can you please not move?"

She didn't say anything but just glared... I think that was rather rude. Especially those tickets to the WPBA matches were NOT CHEAP! I don't want to spend a lot of money to be treated like a dirty mop water...I don't think the guy even knew what he did...

Another time, during a TV match...OK same person here... Believe it or not, I am not trying to pick on her but I did not witness anyone else to come off rude... so here goes.
During Sarah E's shot, Steve T. had to be very close to see if her shirt may commit a foul. Sarah had to stretch over the ball... However, the TV crew either didn't know why Steve was there or didn't care because one of the camera crew hissed at Steve to get out of the camera's view...

Well she missed the shot and got up and shot a nasty look at the camera crew who was just doing his job...

To stop someone and "warn" them to watch the player in the future... Most of people already KNEW about someone's rudeness and openly spoke about it. I just happen to witness it first hand...

However, now according to the "new" WPBA Code of Conduct which (you joked about ) being written by someone who was very familiar with the Legal Talk... forbids WPBA member talking about anything negative and put everything in WRITING to the board.

My question was if only written form of complaint will be acknowledged, then must you wait until the match is over to file the complaint or do you stop the match and write a complaint?

I personally don't put up with people trying to bully me... I usually confront them face to face.

S.

9balllvr
08-12-2008, 07:20 PM
Sunny,
As you noted I did make a crack about the legal speak, but I do not think the rules themselves are a joke in the least. As far as your question about when you should file a complaint, I suppose that would depend on the conduct at the time. Are you supposed to deal with someone nudging you or pushing you down during a match, NO. Are you to expect that some people are catty and obviously not the nicest of people, sure, why not? such is life not to mention many will use it to their advantage - it is a form of mental sharking. I think common sense would play a hand in how you would approach any given situation such as this. Generally, rules are provided as a basic code of conduct and then situations that are out of line are addressed accordingly. Do you think the WPBA wants its players to come off as asses in the arena, I doubt not. That is the whole intention (as I read it) that they have instituted these rules.

As far as someone (in this case Sarah Ellerby) glaring at someone, who cares really. This is a professional player attempting to maintain focus in a professional event - would you not be pissed yourself if someone in the audience was being rude (whether they knew it or not). I have been known to throw a glare here and there as well when playing. Since this is your example, quite frankly we have NO IDEA what Sarah was thinking at that moment NOR do we know if her gaze was directed at someone in particular versus looking to see where the noise was coming from. If Tiger Woods is in mid-swing and someone makes noise, don't you think he would turn and glare at them as well. Look, I don't know Sarah other than seeing her at regional events when she first started. She has never been a big smiley person to begin with from what I witnessed, but for all I know she is quite pleasant. I have many a friend that aren't peppy and jovial, but they are great people, they just don't come off that way initially because they don't smile all the time. Just a little food for thought.

9balllvr

sunnyday
08-12-2008, 07:47 PM
Sunny,
As you noted I did make a crack about the legal speak, but I do not think the rules themselves are a joke in the least. As far as your question about when you should file a complaint, I suppose that would depend on the conduct at the time. Are you supposed to deal with someone nudging you or pushing you down during a match, NO. Are you to expect that some people are catty and obviously not the nicest of people, sure, why not? such is life not to mention many will use it to their advantage - it is a form of mental sharking. I think common sense would play a hand in how you would approach any given situation such as this. Generally, rules are provided as a basic code of conduct and then situations that are out of line are addressed accordingly. Do you think the WPBA wants its players to come off as asses in the arena, I doubt not. That is the whole intention (as I read it) that they have instituted these rules.

As far as someone (in this case Sarah Ellerby) glaring at someone, who cares really. This is a professional player attempting to maintain focus in a professional event - would you not be pissed yourself if someone in the audience was being rude (whether they knew it or not). I have been known to throw a glare here and there as well when playing. Since this is your example, quite frankly we have NO IDEA what Sarah was thinking at that moment NOR do we know if her gaze was directed at someone in particular versus looking to see where the noise was coming from. If Tiger Woods is in mid-swing and someone makes noise, don't you think he would turn and glare at them as well. Look, I don't know Sarah other than seeing her at regional events when she first started. She has never been a big smiley person to begin with from what I witnessed, but for all I know she is quite pleasant. I have many a friend that aren't peppy and jovial, but they are great people, they just don't come off that way initially because they don't smile all the time. Just a little food for thought.

9balllvr

You are right, some of the nicest and sweetest people can be less peppy. Even for myself, depending on when and where you meet me for the first time, I could be "Sunny Day" or "Clowdy Night":grin-square:

I am sure Sarah E's closest friends who know her on the personal level will vouch for how wonderful individual she is. I truly believe she probably has amazing qualities... She carries very impressive line of sponsors and is internationally involved in several projects. I don't know what it takes to pull off something of that caliber, but guessing a great personality could be a good start;)

I just think as a "Professional", she could had put on a little pleasant front to the fans...

Just my two cents...

S.

Edited for spelling :)

Melissa Herndon
08-12-2008, 08:50 PM
However, now according to the "new" WPBA Code of Conduct which (you joked about ) being written by someone who was very familiar with the Legal Talk... forbids WPBA member talking about anything negative and put everything in WRITING to the board.

Code of conduct is not new. It's been the same since I started playing in 2000. I can't vouch for before that....but I would bet that it's been the same for longer than that.

Sunny, I know you were referring to someone else calling it new....but I couldn't find that post. So I am just correcting that notion. This exact same Code of Conduct has been around for years.

Melissa

"T"
08-12-2008, 09:29 PM
Complaints
All questions or complaints must be directed privately, in writing, to the tournament director or to a WPBA board member. Any public criticism or complaints are not permitted and the person responsible will be fined ($100.00 up to $5000.00)

Code of Conduct
Players are under scrutiny at all times as a professional and, as such, must avoid behavior that would discredit their fellow professionals, the WPBA, or the sport of billiards.

All players will be responsible for following all rules and regulations as set forth by the WPBA by-laws, the policy handbook, and any other regulations mandated by the on-site tournament officials and hosts.

Members of the WPBA must not make or cause to be made any statements (whether verbal or in writing), or take or cause others to take action which may, in the opinion of the wpba board, bring that member, the wpba or its agents, or the sport of billiards into disrepute.

The wpba may take action against any player member convicted of a felony and restrict their participation in the wpba events.

Player members shall not address criticism of fellow players, tournament personnel, equipment, or facilities to fellow members, the press, or any others. All such complaints should be submitted in writing to the tournament director or to a wpba board member.

Tournament officials may penalize any player abusing rules or regulations of the tournament or code of conduct at their discretion, including calling fouls, awarding games to an opponent, or forfeiting the offending players match.

Code of conduct violations inside the arena- unsportsmanlike conduct, intentional sharking, abusive or profane language, public abuse of equipment-physical or verbal, drinking during a match, rudeness to officials/players/spectators/sponsors, etc.

1. Written warning (verbal inside the arena with a write-up to go in the file)
2. Fine (minimum $100) + possible penalty TBD by tournament official (fouls, loss of game, loss of match.)
3. Fine and suspension



Sarah E. has got to be laughing her a$$ off at this.

sunnyday
08-12-2008, 09:41 PM
Code of conduct is not new. It's been the same since I started playing in 2000. I can't vouch for before that....but I would bet that it's been the same for longer than that.

Sunny, I know you were referring to someone else calling it new....but I couldn't find that post. So I am just correcting that notion. This exact same Code of Conduct has been around for years.

Melissa

Melissa,

Thanks for clarifying that. Yeah, many people here, including myself thought it was newly written.

A solid standardization is good and is vital to maintain orders in any organization, I do not contest that. I was just picking on the fact it was a little confusing, especially to members who are not fluent in English. Or maybe just to me... lol.

S.

Johnnyt
08-12-2008, 10:02 PM
Melissa,

Thanks for clarifying that. Yeah, many people here, including myself thought it was newly written.

A solid standardization is good and is vital to maintain orders in any organization, I do not contest that. I was just picking on the fact it was a little confusing, especially to members who are not fluent in English. Or maybe just to me... lol.

S.
This is why we have 20-30 pages of lawyers in every local Yellow Pages. To decode the crap they write. Of course it doen't hurt that 95% of our lawmakers are lawyers either.
It's like the script the doctor gives you to take to the pharmacy...that YOU can't read. It's a note from your doctor to the the pharmacy saying, "I just got my $200 from him, now you get yours". Johnnyt

"T"
08-12-2008, 10:08 PM
Code of conduct is not new. It's been the same since I started playing in 2000. I can't vouch for before that....but I would bet that it's been the same for longer than that.

Sunny, I know you were referring to someone else calling it new....but I couldn't find that post. So I am just correcting that notion. This exact same Code of Conduct has been around for years.

Melissa


I didn't see your post before my earlier one and thanks for clarifying that this is not new.

I still don't see how this secrecy thing is healthy. I'm sure you would agree with everyone that we hope these kind of incidents never happen again, but these guidelines the way they are written, can inadvertently punish the victim more than offender.

Jennifer Chen's reaction to these incidents was complete and involuntary shock. Everyone who posted critically of Sarah E. just after the incident, including myself, was shocked as well! The reaction to these incidents by Jennifer, and others, was not a deliberate planned out smear campaign, it was complete horror and disgust.

You can't expect anyone to be silent when someone sticks them with a needle.

ridewiththewind
08-12-2008, 10:47 PM
I find it intensely interesting that the Code of Conduct is quite specific as to what will constitute a violation of disclosure of WPBA 'secrets', including how the discipline is to be handled...but quite unspecific as to what constitutes poor behavior...and any resultant discipline.

Anytime an organization goes to such lengths as to muzzle their members, and to protect their 'secrecy', I believe it makes them more suspect...and infinitely more corruption-prone.

Sorry...but a duck is a duck is a duck.

Lisa

PETARD
08-18-2008, 09:59 PM
Have you ever read a Code of Conduct for any other sport? Or the canons of ethics that lawyers are obligated to abide by (however unsuccessfully)?

Many such codes speak to behavior in private life. And lawyers are bound not only to avoid impropriety..but the APPEARANCE of inpropriety.

Say what you want about the women's tour organization but at least they HAVE one.

Regards,
Jim

WE FINALLY AGREE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Williebetmore
08-19-2008, 06:32 AM
Great post that shows you see the big picture. There are reasons the WPBA is the only American pro pool tour that has stood the test of time, and one of the biggest of them is administrative and operational superiority.

sjm,
Let me agree with you; with one caveat:

Such regulations are only valuable and appropriate if both the board and players adhere to them faithfully.

If the board is to ignore episodes of probable cheating (code of conduct violations); take no steps to discourage cheating; and if the players are going to play dishonorably because they can get away with it; then much of the code is valueless in the eyes of the fans.

In addition, a board that decides to not report the results of well known inquiries will always be viewed as attempting to avoid the issue by those fans that are aware of the issue. "Not reporting" and "not caring" are fairly close in many people's view.

Pjadedd
08-20-2008, 08:30 AM
I think the WPBA needs a code of conduct like they have. As posted by others, many organizations have clauses that prohibit members of that organization from publicly making derogatory remarks about the rules, other members, etc. There's something for presenting uniformed support, even if internal problems do exist.

Unlike other "regular" organizations, the WPBA is in the public eye because they are viewed on television. It can be very detrimental to the organization on the whole if you have different members spreading different pieces of information. I'm not implying that this currently happens, but it is a possibility with the internet, message boards, etc. When people reveal information over a place such as this one, we will never truly know if what is being said is the truth or that person's version of the truth. It makes it easier to flatly say that things should not be spoken about. It would appear to be too difficult to take it on a case by case basis.


PJ