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Heckler
04-09-2005, 10:17 AM
How do you know when your a good player?????

How do you know level you can REALLY compete at???

How do you know when your good enough to enter tour events???

What are the tell tale signs of not been good enough to compete???

Any thoughts would be appreciated......

scottycoyote
04-09-2005, 10:24 AM
if you do a search on player rankings there are some threads where people talk about what makes an a, b, c, d player.....you might want to start there.

what ur asking is pretty subjective.....id prob start by matching up with the better players in my pool room and see how i did. Of course this still might not answer it for you, if youre gambling and below their level you might not get their full speed.

Ive heard of some tests before.....like you rack a game of 9ball 10 times, each time u break and then take ball in hand and record how many balls you run.....then how many total for the session and that gives you a score, and you compare it to some list, prob someone here has heard more about it. Or how many you can run in straight pool.

recoveryjones
04-09-2005, 10:28 AM
How do you know when your a good player?????

How do you know level you can REALLY compete at???

How do you know when your good enough to enter tour events???

What are the tell tale signs of not been good enough to compete???

Any thoughts would be appreciated......

Where I'm from we have a rating system used for our handicap 9 ball tournaments. Players are rated Pro+,Pro, A+, A, B+, B etc etc.Go in the small weekly local tourneys and everyone will quickly (and for the most part accuratley) let you know where you stand on the rankings totem pole.

With the handicap, EVERYONE is good enough to enter these smaller local tournaments.When you start winning these smaller tourneys and start moving up in rankings to A level or above you are ready to start moving up to some bigger tournaments and some of the smaller regional tours.Start winning there and it's on to even bigger tours.

I think everyone is good enough to compete and your game will improve as you challenge yourself in competitive pressure situations against the best players possible.

I suggest for you to get started in those local weekly smaller tourneys and the rest will take care of itself. RJ

chalkisfree
04-09-2005, 08:09 PM
Where I'm from we have a rating system used for our handicap 9 ball tournaments. Players are rated Pro+,Pro, A+, A, B+, B etc etc.Go in the small weekly local tourneys and everyone will quickly (and for the most part accuratley) let you know where you stand on the rankings totem pole.

With the handicap, EVERYONE is good enough to enter these smaller local tournaments.When you start winning these smaller tourneys and start moving up in rankings to A level or above you are ready to start moving up to some bigger tournaments and some of the smaller regional tours.Start winning there and it's on to even bigger tours.

I think everyone is good enough to compete and your game will improve as you challenge yourself in competitive pressure situations against the best players possible.

I suggest for you to get started in those local weekly smaller tourneys and the rest will take care of itself. RJ
I second that. Jump right into the smaller handicap tourneys and you will get a better idea of where you stand. From there you may be able to negotiate gambling situations a little more accurately too.

I think Scottycoyote was describing the game "99". :)

32-n-d
04-09-2005, 09:53 PM
I use scotty's method to judge. What is it...if you only need the initial ball in hand after the break to run out, you're about an "A"-two a "B"...

I saw a really good post about this on the forum...I'm sure if you search it it'll pop up somewhere.

The method that jones mentioned is a good way also...but then again, it also depends on how strong the players in your area play too.

Gabber
04-09-2005, 10:06 PM
How do you know when your a good player?????

How do you know level you can REALLY compete at???

How do you know when your good enough to enter tour events???

What are the tell tale signs of not been good enough to compete???

Any thoughts would be appreciated......

My advice is to take advice.
Find a certified instructor and he/she will give you an honest opinion. Being a successful pool player has as much to do with attitude, as technical skill.


G

JDB
04-09-2005, 11:44 PM
My advice is to take advice.
Find a certified instructor and he/she will give you an honest opinion. Being a successful pool player has as much to do with attitude, as technical skill.


G
Although I understand what you are saying, I don't necessarily agree. An instructor will give you solid advice; however, they might not even really know how you play.

For example, I went to a well known instructor several months ago and he gave me some good advice, which I have incorporated in my game. However, the manner in which he gave instruction, there was no way he could know whether I was a beginner player or advanced. He watched me shoot several shots and then gave me some "mechanics" advice. There are too many people that play pro level with unorthodox mechanics.

I agree with another poster about matching up or playing in tournaments. That should tell you very quickly where you are at. If you are not doing well in those types of situations, then instruction is the way to go.

FWIW - the instruction helped me, but then again I knew I was nowhere close to A level, much less Pro.

StormHotRod300
04-09-2005, 11:49 PM
Ok the only problem with going into the Smaller Handicap Tournaments is you run into the people who just Bang balls around. And try to shyt the 9ball in.

At the pool hall i frequent, the owner runs Free tournaments for all the lil pansy's on Sun,Mon,Tues. Its a race to 4, loser breaks, and there are some kids who just break, make a ball and try to cheese on the full rack.

And theres maybe 4 or 5 people in the tournament who actually try to play safties or some kinda strategy. Most of the kids just make a couple balls and if they get stuck to where the shot isnt straight in, they just do the HHH, hit hard and hope.

Now the problem in my area, is that nobody wants to play in the open tournaments or ones that limit the rating to A players, because they dont want to hafta play against all the big shooters. unless the tournament is Handicapped.

JDB
04-10-2005, 12:00 AM
Ok the only problem with going into the Smaller Handicap Tournaments is you run into the people who just Bang balls around. And try to shyt the 9ball in.

At the pool hall i frequent, the owner runs Free tournaments for all the lil pansy's on Sun,Mon,Tues. Its a race to 4, loser breaks, and there are some kids who just break, make a ball and try to cheese on the full rack.

And theres maybe 4 or 5 people in the tournament who actually try to play safties or some kinda strategy. Most of the kids just make a couple balls and if they get stuck to where the shot isnt straight in, they just do the HHH, hit hard and hope.

Now the problem in my area, is that nobody wants to play in the open tournaments or ones that limit the rating to A players, because they dont want to hafta play against all the big shooters. unless the tournament is Handicapped.

I don't understand the problem. I will win 90 - 95% of the time when I am playing someone who constantly goes for the 9 with combinations. I would prefer to play against runout players for the experience; however, if I want the cash I would prefer the cheesers.

recoveryjones
04-10-2005, 12:11 AM
Ok the only problem with going into the Smaller Handicap Tournaments is you run into the people who just Bang balls around. And try to shyt the 9ball in.

At the pool hall i frequent, the owner runs Free tournaments for all the lil pansy's on Sun,Mon,Tues. Its a race to 4, loser breaks, and there are some kids who just break, make a ball and try to cheese on the full rack.

And theres maybe 4 or 5 people in the tournament who actually try to play safties or some kinda strategy. Most of the kids just make a couple balls and if they get stuck to where the shot isnt straight in, they just do the HHH, hit hard and hope.

Now the problem in my area, is that nobody wants to play in the open tournaments or ones that limit the rating to A players, because they dont want to hafta play against all the big shooters. unless the tournament is Handicapped.


Every dog can have his day, however, having said that, it's a rare occurance when B+'s or lower win our handicap tourneys. Despite the odd slasher, the cream usually rises to the top.RJ

chalkisfree
04-10-2005, 12:17 AM
Ok the only problem with going into the Smaller Handicap Tournaments is you run into the people who just Bang balls around. And try to shyt the 9ball in.

At the pool hall i frequent, the owner runs Free tournaments for all the lil pansy's on Sun,Mon,Tues. Its a race to 4, loser breaks, and there are some kids who just break, make a ball and try to cheese on the full rack.

And theres maybe 4 or 5 people in the tournament who actually try to play safties or some kinda strategy. Most of the kids just make a couple balls and if they get stuck to where the shot isnt straight in, they just do the HHH, hit hard and hope.

Now the problem in my area, is that nobody wants to play in the open tournaments or ones that limit the rating to A players, because they dont want to hafta play against all the big shooters. unless the tournament is Handicapped.
I've dealt with cheezers before, and although I don't like cheezin', the best time to do it is with a full rack on the table because of the odds on leaving the opponent an open shot. I think that in a race to 4 the cheezer will lose to a B or even a solid C more often than not. Getting matched up with a ballbanger is something I look forward to in a tournament.

Non-handicapped tournaments are great because the better players, the ones who put in more hours of practice time, drills, studying AZforums :) etc. are most likely to be rewarded for their hard work. Handicapped tournaments will always have a few bad apples who like to sandbag. Of course, the reason for the handicap is to get a better turnout by attempting to even up the playing field.

StormHotRod300
04-10-2005, 01:08 AM
I hate dealing with people who Cheese all the time, only because, i swear, i normally end up with crappy leaves, or they clump the balls together, or some other ACT OF GOD happens.

90% of the time i can beat these types of players hands down.

I myself would rather play against guys who are going to try running out, or atleast run the balls untill they come upon the easy cheese, with the 7 or 8 ball right infront of the 9ball.

I havent tried any Handicap tournaments yet, but tempting, only because it would give me a fair shot at beating the big shooters. And yes the handicap tournament at the other pool hall in town, normally someone who hasta goto 6 or 7 normally wins the tournament.

And the other problem is the Handicap tournament everyother sunday normally runs till 1 or 2 am, and i usually work 3rd shift on the weekend. so i wouldnt be able to stay till the end anyways.

Heckler
04-10-2005, 03:57 AM
Interesting......

I am not worried about players who just go for the 9 all the time as you say.....as the bad thing about luck is that it runs out....lol

However I would say that on a good day one chance and I can run a rack no problem however on a bad to average day I could need a couple of chances as my cue ball control tends to let me down.....

Oh well moving to Canada soon so will get shooting in those comps and see what happens

JAM
04-10-2005, 05:00 AM
Interesting......

I am not worried about players who just go for the 9 all the time as you say.....as the bad thing about luck is that it runs out....lol

However I would say that on a good day one chance and I can run a rack no problem however on a bad to average day I could need a couple of chances as my cue ball control tends to let me down.....

Oh well moving to Canada soon so will get shooting in those comps and see what happens

Heckler, when one is practicing and playing pool every single day, much like a 9-to-5 job, their game SHOULD be at their top speed after they devote some time into developing their skills set on the table. It is almost like learning how to play a musical instrument. Some folks are more gifted than others (in music and in pool), and for them, self-confidence comes quicker, but there are some techniques that can only be acquired through experience.

In the court reporting industry, as an example, students pay big bucks to attend schools to develop their stenographic skills, which, again, can only be acquired through many hours of practice each day. Some attain the necessary speed to graduate, but to date, there's about a 2-percent dropout rate because most give up. Then those who do graduate from court reporting schools come out into the "real" world almost kind of green (IMO). It is only through years of experience in the field, developing a knowledge base and being able to tackle every possible scenario that could come up in the pit, recognizing the difference between "uh-huh," "uh-uh," "its/it's," "discreet/discrete," and then produce a verbatim high-quality comprehensive transcript that makes a topnotch court reporter. The reporters who can go into cruise control are the pros.

When you're driving a car and you need to slow down, you're not thinking about the location of the brake pedal being on the floor and that, in fact, you must remove your right foot from the gas pedal to apply pressure to the brake pedal in order to slow down. I'd venture to guess that strong players who are on top of their game aren't thinking about "set, pause, and freeze" because they go into cruise control when they're in the pit.

I have read that Niels Feijen of The Netherlands practices 8 to 10 hours every single day. When you see him play on TV, he's definitely in the zone or "cruise control," if you will.

I don't think there is any easy way to become proficient in pool, without hours and hours of play (IMO), whether in competitive events or in action. The guys/gals I see usually winning the tournaments -- local, regional, national, international -- are the ones who play every single day.

Young or old, male or female, it don't come easy. One pool factoid I like to remember is that Mike Lebron won the U.S. Open when he was 54 years old. :p

JMHO, FWIW!

JAM

jjinfla
04-10-2005, 06:24 AM
Heckler, when one is practicing and playing pool every single day, much like a 9-to-5 job, JAM

Jam, Many people want to be pros but they do not treat it like a job. They will not go "to the office" and put in their eight hours a day. They figure the world owes them a living and they don't have to work for it.

I have heard where Tiger will go to the driving range for four hours after he plays in a tournament.

What kind of court do you work in?

Jake

drivermaker
04-10-2005, 06:36 AM
How do you know when your a good player?????

How do you know level you can REALLY compete at???

How do you know when your good enough to enter tour events???

What are the tell tale signs of not been good enough to compete???

Any thoughts would be appreciated......


Question #1: When you're kicking EVERYONE'S ass for the cash

Question #2: When you're kicking EVERYONE'S ass for the cash at that level

Question #3: When you're kicking EVERYONE'S ass for the cash

Question #4: When you're getting YOUR ASS kicked for the cash

Next question, please.......

JAM
04-10-2005, 06:56 AM
...What kind of court do you work in?...

I've reported in just about every kind of court out there (LOL). However, I enjoy some jobs better than others. I've always found congressional work to be interesting and perhaps enjoy it the most. My claim to court-reporting fame, if you could call it that, was being part of the team which produced the verbatim testimonies of Monica Lewinsky, Vernon Jordan, and Sidney Blumenthal for the Senate, same-day delivery, which was later aired on C-SPAN. In the office, we joked about this event being the Super Bowl of court reporting! :p

Reporting is multi-faceted, much like pool, and is not restricted to court venues. Just like professional pool players, the existing lot of competent court reporters is diminishing, due to the amount of time and money it takes to become proficient. One must be prepared to dedicate themselves and develop their skills accordingly. IT definitely doesn't come easy, but if one REALLY wants IT, IT can happen.

JAM

Heckler
04-10-2005, 07:18 AM
Nice reply Drivemaker.......

TATE
04-10-2005, 07:42 AM
How do you know when your a good player?????

How do you know level you can REALLY compete at???

How do you know when your good enough to enter tour events???

What are the tell tale signs of not been good enough to compete???

Any thoughts would be appreciated......

I will be blunt. If you fear other expert players, the answer is "no". If you have to ask these questions, the answer is "no".

However, any "A" player should enter all the events they can as part of the learning process regardless of if they feel they are competitive or not. You need to really believe you are as good as these other players are to be their equal.

Chris

TATE
04-10-2005, 07:45 AM
Question #1: When you're kicking EVERYONE'S ass for the cash

Question #2: When you're kicking EVERYONE'S ass for the cash at that level

Question #3: When you're kicking EVERYONE'S ass for the cash

Question #4: When you're getting YOUR ASS kicked for the cash

Next question, please.......

Drivermaker,

If you're kicking everyone's ass for the cash, you're either playing crappy opponents or you're Efren. All good players lose. The best ones are not afraid of losing.

Chris

chefjeff
04-10-2005, 07:48 AM
How do you know when your a good player?????

(snip)......

Whenever you delude yourself into thinking you're good, you're "good.". Then you can drink at the bar and brag about having made your way through college and bought a home simply by playing pool.

"Back in my day __________" is all you need to know. Then just fill in the blank and--presto!--you're "good."

No use wasting all that time and energy actually playing. Just make it up as you go.

Oh, if someone actually ask you to play? Say this: "Oh I would, but I've been there, done that. And besides, my back isn't what it used to be."

Now back to reality...There's only one way to know: compete with those who are good. You'll know soon enough without asking.

Jeff Livingston

ceebee
04-10-2005, 08:01 AM
10 Ball Practice Drill x Joe Tucker (as printed in The GREAT Break Shot book)

I use this drill myself in practice and I have used it successfully to rate players, for about fourteen years. There are variations to this drill, but this one is usually very accurate and in the long run, very reliable.

NOTE: If you Scratch on the Break, spot any balls you may have made and continue. Be sure to try the 10 Ball racks you have read about in this book, while you are doing this drill.

Rack all 10 Balls, break the rack, take “ball in hand” and pocket as many balls in numerical order, as you can. When you miss or scratch, start over. Record the number of pocketed balls in each attempt. Play 10 racks for a good comparison, add your score up and divide by 10, that number will be your rating. Repeat your drills with the emphasis on raising that number. (continued)
Example shown below

# 1 Rack 5
# 2 Rack 7
# 3 Rack 6
# 4 Rack 7
# 5 Rack 7
# 6 Rack 4
# 7 Rack 7
# 8 Rack 7
# 9 Rack 6
# 10 Rack 7
Score 63 or 6.3 Look at your rating below.

Pro 70 or above
AAA – 10 65 – 70
AA – 9 60 – 65
A – 8 55 – 60
BB – 7 50 – 55
B – 6 45 – 50
CC – 5 40 – 45
C – 4 35 – 40
DD – 3 30 – 35

This is a great drill to track your scores with. One score does not set a player’s rating in concrete.

You should have a good idea of your true rating, after completing this drill 10 times. Do yourself justice and do not fudge when recording your ball count. Do not start over.

This drill is also a good way to compete against another player. This activity will allow you to handicap your matches accurately, once you have completed several drills. This drill is so accurate, better players will not like it and I cannot blame them. If you record a bad score, that is okay. You can improve as you do these drills. If you only record your high scores, you will not be able to continually play to your rating.

Do not cheat yourself. Correctly record the ball count, see how you really play. 10 Ball is a much more difficult game than 9 Ball. Because fewer balls are made on the break, there are more balls left on the table. There are more clusters; this requires you to have better playing skills and more knowledge.

10 Ball is not just another ball on the pool table; it is another level of skill that requires, better position, better safety play and consistent pocketing of balls in order to maintain a high level of competition.

drivermaker
04-10-2005, 09:19 AM
Drivermaker,

If you're kicking everyone's ass for the cash, you're either playing crappy opponents or you're Efren. All good players lose. The best ones are not afraid of losing.

Chris


OK...then "Most of the time or a much higher % of the times than you're losing"

TATE
04-10-2005, 09:53 AM
OK...then "Most of the time or a much higher % of the times than you're losing"

But I agree otherwise. When you get to the point where you have to go out of your way looking for decent opponents because you've beat everyone else, that's progress.

Chris

Heckler
04-10-2005, 12:34 PM
Hey,

The reason I am askin is not lack of confidence just lack of experiance of american pool disciplines and the average standard of play in the US....

I am an english man soon to be moving to canada and competing at your great game...however I come from an english pool background which I can tell you is VERY different...although I am confident I will kick ass at 8 ball on your bar box tables...a good english pool player will eat that up....

So next question who wants to give me a chance to find out how good or bad I am????

vapoolplayer
04-10-2005, 01:04 PM
Hey,

The reason I am askin is not lack of confidence just lack of experiance of american pool disciplines and the average standard of play in the US....

I am an english man soon to be moving to canada and competing at your great game...however I come from an english pool background which I can tell you is VERY different...although I am confident I will kick ass at 8 ball on your bar box tables...a good english pool player will eat that up....

So next question who wants to give me a chance to find out how good or bad I am????


well, i say all or nothing...............the lion splits his time in canada.............you'll find out real quick what level you're playing at when you play him............... :D

VAP

Heckler
04-10-2005, 01:17 PM
lol

I am up for a game but I know not to go for the VERY best at my first go....lol

Alex is WAY outta my league........

AceHigh
04-10-2005, 01:43 PM
lol

I am up for a game but I know not to go for the VERY best at my first go....lol

Alex is WAY outta my league........


I'll give Alex the 7
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
if he plays blindfolded and with a toothpick.

PoolBum
04-10-2005, 02:02 PM
Although I understand what you are saying, I don't necessarily agree. An instructor will give you solid advice; however, they might not even really know how you play.

For example, I went to a well known instructor several months ago and he gave me some good advice, which I have incorporated in my game. However, the manner in which he gave instruction, there was no way he could know whether I was a beginner player or advanced. He watched me shoot several shots and then gave me some "mechanics" advice. There are too many people that play pro level with unorthodox mechanics.



Having an unorthodox playing style is not the same thing as having poor mechanics. Many great players have unorthodox styles; none of them have poor mechanics. You simply can't play well with poor mechanics.

DaveK
04-11-2005, 09:03 AM
...I am an english man soon to be moving to canada and competing at your great game...
So next question who wants to give me a chance to find out how good or bad I am????

Canada is a big place, but if you get to Saskatoon I can play and/or set you up with a game. There are other folks on the board from a few places across Canada, let us know where you end up ...

Dave

anonymouscoward
04-11-2005, 04:16 PM
"You go pro when you can dominate locally. When you are top dog at every tournament you go to in your area. Then you are ready to start traveling and hitting other tournaments.", replied Reed Pierce (95 US Open winner) when asked this question.

fxskater
04-11-2005, 04:27 PM
How do you know when your a good player?????
Depends what you think a good player is. When people ask Rick Marshall if he is a good player (2 time Alberta Champ) he says 'I'm pretty good i guess' Which is not all modesty, he Thinks World Beaters are good players. My Answer: You know you are a good player when you can beat other players that you consider GOOD PLAYERS. In sets not games.

How do you know level you can REALLY compete at???
Play 10 pros 10 races to 9. If you win 1 your likely an A+, if you come close your likely a B. Not an exact system, but you can generally measure yourself against what people tell you are A or B players by playing them. If you win more than 50% against a B you might be approaching a B+ level.
How do you know when your good enough to enter tour events???
Do you have to be good to enter events? Noone told me that. I went out 2 straight in 4 straight events that i was not good enough to play in, but guess what In my 5th event i won my first 2 matches, does that make me good enough?
What are the tell tale signs of not been good enough to compete???

Any thoughts would be appreciated......

When you KNOW you are going to win every match before it is played. I don't neccessarily win every match, but i go into every single one not THINKING i MIGHT win but KNOWING im GOING to win. I honestly feel confidence is your telltale sign.

fxskater
04-11-2005, 04:30 PM
If you don't like my previous post i have a second method. Go play the best player in your area 3 sets race to 9, then ask him those questions. If he is a GOOD GOOD players he will likely have some answers for you.

recoveryjones
04-11-2005, 05:48 PM
10 Ball Practice Drill x Joe Tucker (as printed in The GREAT Break Shot book)

I use this drill myself in practice and I have used it successfully to rate players, for about fourteen years. There are variations to this drill, but this one is usually very accurate and in the long run, very reliable.

NOTE: If you Scratch on the Break, spot any balls you may have made and continue. Be sure to try the 10 Ball racks you have read about in this book, while you are doing this drill.

Rack all 10 Balls, break the rack, take “ball in hand” and pocket as many balls in numerical order, as you can. When you miss or scratch, start over. Record the number of pocketed balls in each attempt. Play 10 racks for a good comparison, add your score up and divide by 10, that number will be your rating. Repeat your drills with the emphasis on raising that number. (continued)
Example shown below

# 1 Rack 5
# 2 Rack 7
# 3 Rack 6
# 4 Rack 7
# 5 Rack 7
# 6 Rack 4
# 7 Rack 7
# 8 Rack 7
# 9 Rack 6
# 10 Rack 7
Score 63 or 6.3 Look at your rating below.

Pro 70 or above
AAA – 10 65 – 70
AA – 9 60 – 65
A – 8 55 – 60
BB – 7 50 – 55
B – 6 45 – 50
CC – 5 40 – 45
C – 4 35 – 40
DD – 3 30 – 35

This is a great drill to track your scores with. One score does not set a player’s rating in concrete.

You should have a good idea of your true rating, after completing this drill 10 times. Do yourself justice and do not fudge when recording your ball count. Do not start over.

This drill is also a good way to compete against another player. This activity will allow you to handicap your matches accurately, once you have completed several drills. This drill is so accurate, better players will not like it and I cannot blame them. If you record a bad score, that is okay. You can improve as you do these drills. If you only record your high scores, you will not be able to continually play to your rating.

Do not cheat yourself. Correctly record the ball count, see how you really play. 10 Ball is a much more difficult game than 9 Ball. Because fewer balls are made on the break, there are more balls left on the table. There are more clusters; this requires you to have better playing skills and more knowledge.

10 Ball is not just another ball on the pool table; it is another level of skill that requires, better position, better safety play and consistent pocketing of balls in order to maintain a high level of competition.


Drills are a good measuring stick to let YOU know where YOU stand in terms of your own personal ability.I'm an expert at drills and God has seen me shoot some awesome pool....LOL.By doing drills, one can become a real expert at just that....doing drills.You pretty much learn what you are capable of in those intimate moments with just you and the pool table.

As a practice junkie I now realize that I have to take what I've learned in the drills and be able to perform it when the heat is on.For the most part I'm a 1/2 rank to a full rank below my standard (except for occasional sets) when the heat is on.

So when someone asks me,"How good are you?' Do I answer how good I am in practice or how good I am come match time?

I think the above drill you've listed is a good one,however, probably could tend to be more difficult (for some) with a practice partner. RJ

TATE
04-11-2005, 07:58 PM
I think the above drill you've listed is a good one,however, probably could tend to be more difficult (for some) with a practice partner. RJ

LOL. I can run 10 and out quite a bit. If I want to convert to 2's and 3's, I just ask my wife to stand there.

Chris

recoveryjones
04-11-2005, 08:34 PM
Hi Tate, Hope you're keeping well.

Anyways thanks for the support with regards to playing in a crowd.

I seem to win 75% of my matches for table against players of my rating.One A level player declared me as the best "for table" player in the house. Put $10 measley dollars on it and my pride,ego and fear factor kicks in and I can fold like a cheap Wallmart tent :mad:

Anyways enough of that negative self talk, next time I play for $$$, I'm going to kick $ome A$$ :D RJ