PDA

View Full Version : New things thread.


Johnny "V"
05-06-2009, 06:50 AM
Just wanted to post that I have found something that has sparked my interest again. I post this to thank those that posted to my laksidasical post.

So I was playing Que Skills last night and had a very tough shot on the 2nd ball of the rotation part. I noticed that when I have tough shots that my pre-shot routine is different. I look at the shot, picture it going into the hole 3 times (a tip from Blackjack) sort of a minds eye type thing. I bend down and have one last minds eye shot again. Tip placement on the cue ball and take a couple of practice strokes. Pull back and pause. Now I get a sense of how it feels. If it doesn't feel right make a minor adjustment, a couple of practice strokes pull back pause. Fire when it feels like it is going to go into the pocket. If it still doesn't feel right start over.

I never do this on regular shots. I go up look at the shot, do a minds eye, bend down and go straight from practice strokes to firing it in the hole (or into the rail as has happened a lot lately). No pause. I have added the pause to all my shots and added 3.12 points to my Que Skills score per rack.

I tried both ways and found that if I am hitting with power without the pause I put an arm whip in my final stroke. When I pause at my back stroke it is like I am throwing a dart versus throwing a baseball. Everything is even and in line.

With this new found stroke I am looking forward to practice again.

What things have you found that is not normal that improved your game that I might also be able to try?

JV

3Bros Billiards
05-06-2009, 08:21 AM
I think I need to take your advise. Lately I think I've been pulling the trigger too early. Sometimes I get up to the table take a couple practice strokes and shoot.... and miss. When I think back on it, I knew the shot didn't feel quite right, but I shot it anyways. It sounds like such a stupid problem, but Its becoming hard for me to fix.

okinawa77
05-06-2009, 08:28 AM
On normal shots I have the standard forward lean with back leg almost straight, but on rail shots (CB on the rail) with top spin, I lean back with my forward leg straight. This helps me to sight the shot better.
Using a normal stance on this shot, I will miss the shot by a hair at a high percentage, but...using the lean-back stance, I pocket the OB at a high percentage.

Sweet Marissa
05-06-2009, 08:38 AM
When I feel lackadaisical over anything, I take a step back for a breather. Don't push yourself into enjoying it again or you'll just stress and frustrate yourself.

Johnny "V"
05-06-2009, 09:18 AM
When I feel lackadaisical over anything, I take a step back for a breather. Don't push yourself into enjoying it again or you'll just stress and frustrate yourself.
Oh noooooo. I never said that I didn't enjoy pool. I love banging the balls about playing the ghost (and now am enjoying Que Skills). I know these only help pattern play and have got to go back to standard position and potting drills soon. Just for right now they don't hold my attention for very long. I need to come up with a new aiming or position system or something similar to get me to go back to knocking 5 balls in the pocket over and Over and OVER again.

The day that I stop enjoying pool there is going to be one hell of a table for sale in the Wanted/For Sale section :)

JV

Ponytail
05-06-2009, 09:22 AM
I agree that on critical shots, (I.E. Hard shots, be it 3/4 or half a pocket, or critical shape, or shots you have to hit very firm to get the cue ball to where it needs to go etc.) you need to have a slightly different pre shot routine.
Seeing the shot happen in your mind is VERY important. Perception IS reality.
The next step in that process is when you see it happen, FEEL it happen.
While standing up, practice the smooth stroke you'll use. All the way through the entire shot.
Basically, you're shooting the shot in the air, while standing up. Combine this with the visualization of the shot, you've basically already shot the shot.
Now relax. See the shot doing exactly what you want to have happen. Combine that with shooting it in the air, while standing up.

Now get your base in positions (stance). Get comfortable. Slide into position. (I slide my bridge hand into position down the aim line) Eye pattern. Tip. Aim. Tip. Aim. In my head "Smooth backstroke, smooth finish. Split the pocket". Focus on aim spot. Smooth backstroke, relax, hit my finish.

It's amazing when I do it.

It is one thing I have to constantly be aware of, is the critical shot. My old habit was to sort of punch it, due to nervousness.. but since I started that routine. Very nice results.

Not to make this any longer, I basically agree that your pre shot routine will be different for critical shots. Slightly more detailed and broken down.

Keep it up and good playing.

Sweet Marissa
05-06-2009, 09:32 AM
Oh noooooo. I never said that I didn't enjoy pool. I love banging the balls about playing the ghost (and now am enjoying Que Skills). I know these only help pattern play and have got to go back to standard position and potting drills soon. Just for right now they don't hold my attention for very long. I need to come up with a new aiming or position system or something similar to get me to go back to knocking 5 balls in the pocket over and Over and OVER again.

The day that I stop enjoying pool there is going to be one hell of a table for sale in the Wanted/For Sale section :)

JV
Oh, you said you were feeling lackadaisical so thought I'd offer up my bit of advice. I'll take a pool table, though :D

Joe Pickens
05-07-2009, 07:27 AM
Since my pool leagues are over for the year I decided to try something new during my practice sessions. So, I tried the extended pause at the end of my backstroke, but when I would shoot it seems like I am punching the ball instead of a smooth stroke. After a miscue a couple of times I gave up shooting that way.

Is that how it is suppose to feel until you get the hang of it or am I doing something wrong?

CreeDo
05-07-2009, 10:36 AM
Joe, it's normal for the pause to feel uncomfortable for a bit. It almost feels like if you can't do a smooth back-to-forward motion, you aren't really stroking the ball. It may seem jerky and mechanical. It did to me when I first started. Sometimes I still feel like it's a little stiff. But the funny thing is that when I really really need to make a tough shot, like a thin cut from 7 feet, I need that pause now to stay on track and deliver the ball where I intend. I make the shot a lot more, and when I miss it, I know it's not because some funk in my stroke send the OB in the wrong direction. I sent the cue ball where I wanted at least.

When first learning it, learn it on shots that require only medium speed. Also stick to shots that use mostly center or follow. Power stroke shots are tough to do with an extended pause. If I have to do full table draw, I still can't pause before getting it. I need to do a regular back-to-forward swing without pausing.

I really rely on the pause in 3 common situations... long shots (thin or straight in, doesn't matter... I need accuracy)... rail cuts where you need just the right amount of low outside to get the correct angle on the next ball... and short precision draw shots where it's important I go only 3 inches and not 5 or something.

The pause is the nuts and I think it'll help anyone's game. It reveals bad habits that you either don't know about or won't admit or don't want to fix. You can see very clearly during that pause when you're about to steer the stick instead of delivering straight forward or back. And you pay more attention to your backswing too. Even if you have a very straight stroke, the pause makes you focus on shots like never before.

Other "new things" that improved me game:

-recently I tried aiming at the base of the first ball during my 8-ball break. I hit the head ball a lot more squarely and squat the cue ball more often.

-I tried a little trick for making long straight-in shots... you shoot in a way that you know will result in the cue ball stopping dead. You just focus on the stop and not the shot. If you can do that, the object ball has to go into the pocket.

Johnny "V"
05-07-2009, 11:51 AM
Joe, it's normal for the pause to feel uncomfortable for a bit. It almost feels like if you can't do a smooth back-to-forward motion, you aren't really stroking the ball. It may seem jerky and mechanical. It did to me when I first started. Sometimes I still feel like it's a little stiff. But the funny thing is that when I really really need to make a tough shot, like a thin cut from 7 feet, I need that pause now to stay on track and deliver the ball where I intend. I make the shot a lot more, and when I miss it, I know it's not because some funk in my stroke send the OB in the wrong direction. I sent the cue ball where I wanted at least.

When first learning it, learn it on shots that require only medium speed. Also stick to shots that use mostly center or follow. Power stroke shots are tough to do with an extended pause. If I have to do full table draw, I still can't pause before getting it. I need to do a regular back-to-forward swing without pausing.

I really rely on the pause in 3 common situations... long shots (thin or straight in, doesn't matter... I need accuracy)... rail cuts where you need just the right amount of low outside to get the correct angle on the next ball... and short precision draw shots where it's important I go only 3 inches and not 5 or something.

The pause is the nuts and I think it'll help anyone's game. It reveals bad habits that you either don't know about or won't admit or don't want to fix. You can see very clearly during that pause when you're about to steer the stick instead of delivering straight forward or back. And you pay more attention to your backswing too. Even if you have a very straight stroke, the pause makes you focus on shots like never before.

Other "new things" that improved me game:

-recently I tried aiming at the base of the first ball during my 8-ball break. I hit the head ball a lot more squarely and squat the cue ball more often.

-I tried a little trick for making long straight-in shots... you shoot in a way that you know will result in the cue ball stopping dead. You just focus on the stop and not the shot. If you can do that, the object ball has to go into the pocket.
Great response...

If you feel as though you are poking at the ball pull the back stroke as far back as you like (don't worry you won't pull the tip through your fingers because it is not like you are taking several practice strokes) and stroke through the CB with the same speed as the practice strokes you took. I have noticed that I am getting a bit more spin on the cue ball because I am concentrating on that final stroke more than I was by see-sawing and firing. Also any hitch in my stroke that I had before that might have been throwing tip placement on the CB is now gone.

When you "feel" the shot you really know that it is going into the hole. If it doesn't it is like seeing something that you cannot believe. You actually feel confusion. I am assuming that it is because in your head you have already shot the shot 4 times and it has already gone in 4 times and when it doesn't your minds eye saz.... "NO WAY!!!". It really is a strange feeling.

JV