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JDP12
05-08-2009, 03:12 PM
hey all- just thought I would say hello, first post and all.

I just started playing pool seriously about a month ago, and play as much as time allows with school. I've been playing with a cue that came with our pool table, a Brunswick.

I'm nowhere near good enough to be needing a dedicated cue, but I just thought I would pose this question because my birthday is coming up in a few months...

When would you consider oneself good enough to need to buy a cue?
Is a break/jump cue really needed in the beginning? I'm guessing not...but was just wondering.

So just wanted to pose those two, I consider the first more important of a question than the latter.

Thanks,

JDP

dajeff71
05-08-2009, 03:17 PM
JDP - I say that regardless of your skill level it can help to have a quality cue. The important thing is that you feel like you are good enough. The consistency of having the same cue every time that you play can increase your game in itself. That benefit is worth getting a cue at any point in your development as a player. I say go for it. I suggest first getting a playing cue that you like and can get used to, which may take a little while. Later think about getting a break/jump cue but in the meantime don't use your playing cue to break with because it can damage the tip and the shaft. The playing cue is much more important because you use it the majority of the time. Hope this helps!

SupaFoo
05-08-2009, 03:26 PM
Welcome JDP!

In a few months, if you feel like you've gotten realky into the game, the I would suggest buying your own playing cue to get used to. It's a bigtime buyer's market right now so it's as good a time as any to buy. I'd say go for a used custom sneaky pete right off the bat - it'll hold it's resale value a lot better than a production cue and you'll be getting a fine piece of craftsman ship for a decent price.

If you also want a J/B cue, I would suggest picking up a J&J break jump - great bang for the buck, only gonna run you around $60 shipped last time I checked.

Just keep playing for a few weeks and see if you start getting really hooked - if you start pocketing balls in your dreams (like I did) then you'll know - LOL

Hope this helps and welcome once again!

snipershot
05-08-2009, 03:26 PM
Any time is a good time to get your own personal cue. Even a cheap cue is fine to start with as long as you keep playing with the same cue. I use the same cue every time I play, even though I have several cues that will work, I know how my playing cue performs and feels. Keep playing with that cue you have been using, or buy a new one now, just make sure you play with the same cue all the time.


Joe

9BallPaul
05-08-2009, 03:27 PM
hey all- just thought I would say hello, first post and all.

I just started playing pool seriously about a month ago, and play as much as time allows with school. I've been playing with a cue that came with our pool table, a Brunswick.

I'm nowhere near good enough to be needing a dedicated cue, but I just thought I would pose this question because my birthday is coming up in a few months...

When would you consider oneself good enough to need to buy a cue?
Is a break/jump cue really needed in the beginning? I'm guessing not...but was just wondering.

So just wanted to pose those two, I consider the first more important of a question than the latter.

Thanks,

JDP

Now is the time to experiment with lots of different cues -- from 17 oz. to 21 oz. would be my suggestion. Also vary the shaft thickness, from narrow to thick. A stick is an instrument of personal preference. You'll shoot your best when you have confidence in your cue.

Once you've settled on a weight and shaft thickness -- around 19 oz. for most of us, and with a medium to skinny shaft -- you can then investigate the nice production cues that can be had in the $100 to $200 range. The other property you'll begin to notice is "hit" -- how the cue feels when it strikes the cue ball. Once again, "hit" is highly personal and the subject of many arguments on this board, most of them silly.

Anyway, if you're still in the game after owning a good production cue for a couple of years, and you're still intent on moving up the ladder, the sky is the limit in terms of what you can spend. A stick can't possibly make you a better player, but it can give you the confidence that a better player must have.

Have a blast, visit your local pool hall and ask around, and enjoy the game.

bfdlad
05-08-2009, 03:44 PM
hey all- just thought I would say hello, first post and all.

I just started playing pool seriously about a month ago, and play as much as time allows with school. I've been playing with a cue that came with our pool table, a Brunswick.

I'm nowhere near good enough to be needing a dedicated cue, but I just thought I would pose this question because my birthday is coming up in a few months...

When would you consider oneself good enough to need to buy a cue?
Is a break/jump cue really needed in the beginning? I'm guessing not...but was just wondering.

So just wanted to pose those two, I consider the first more important of a question than the latter.

Thanks,

JDP
Hey JDP, Welcome to the pool world I hope you have fun with it. I understand you are a begginner but I am sure that I can help you get a feel for the game and its ins and outs. The best way I think is if you and I get together and play a couple of $100 sets and when you start seeing improvement we can move up to maybe $500 sets. I have no problem spending the whole day or even weekend helping you work on your game like this. Unlike some of these other pool schools like the Legends and Champions Pool Tour I will not charge you an hourly rate or anything. Please let me know as I am eager to help,:)
Mark :D :D

grindz
05-08-2009, 03:53 PM
hey all- just thought I would say hello, first post and all.

I just started playing pool seriously about a month ago, and play as much as time allows with school. I've been playing with a cue that came with our pool table, a Brunswick.

I'm nowhere near good enough to be needing a dedicated cue, but I just thought I would pose this question because my birthday is coming up in a few months...

When would you consider oneself good enough to need to buy a cue?
Is a break/jump cue really needed in the beginning? I'm guessing not...but was just wondering.

So just wanted to pose those two, I consider the first more important of a question than the latter.

Thanks,

JDP

Welcome to the forum!

You don't need to be good to buy/own a cue. I would first get 3 other weights (18-21 oz.) of house cues for your home game room. Have a good cue mechanic install good tips on all (read threads to find which tip is good for you on AZB). Now you can experiment which feels the best for you. Use one of the others to break with, and use your favorite to practice with. Get used to it. Learning to play with a house cue is a good place to start.

I wouldn't buy a 2 piece until you really want to take a cue with you to play. It does limit you, having one in the car.... can't leave it in there, etc.

Good luck, and keep on posting. Lots of knowledge here!!

td

J.T.450r
05-08-2009, 03:53 PM
I agree with all the above posts.. This is a little off topic but anyways you might want to pick up a book on billiards basics or surround yourself with good players I say this because alot of us wish we could go back to the beginning and change our bad habits (stroke, stance, routine) now might be a good time to learn the proper bridge stance stroke ect. before it gets to hard to change bad habits without getting worse first.

TX Poolnut
05-08-2009, 03:57 PM
I think you should get a cue as soon as you can. It doesn't have to be the greatest cue in the world, but it'll give you something to put in your case and be proud of. Using the same cue and tip combination all the time may help with your consistency too.

I wouldn't woory too much about a jump cue until you are really ready to start practicing jumping.

JDP12
05-08-2009, 04:10 PM
wow thanks for all the replies....

Well we have a 18, 19, 20, 21... but either the 20 or 21 is slightly warped...

I've played enough in the past to know I don't like the heavier, and prefer the 18 or 19, the 18 preferably.

Would you recommend I just play for a few more weeks, then go to a billiards store and just start looking at cues to see what i like?

Are there any specific brands that I should be keeping my eye out for?

I'll look into the tips- even I can tell that the tips on these cues aren't the highest quality :wink:

TheNewSharkster
05-08-2009, 04:19 PM
My dad recently got a Brunswick table that came with a set of cues. I cant put my finger on it but they feel cheap. I have been shooting with a Joss for several years now so that might have something to do with it.

Head over to the buy/sell forum. You can find lots of cues for around $100 that will suit you well (i.e. Mcdermott, Viking, Lucasi or maybe even a custom cue).

JXMIKE
05-08-2009, 04:24 PM
wow thanks for all the replies....

Well we have a 18, 19, 20, 21... but either the 20 or 21 is slightly warped...

I've played enough in the past to know I don't like the heavier, and prefer the 18 or 19, the 18 preferably.

Would you recommend I just play for a few more weeks, then go to a billiards store and just start looking at cues to see what i like?

Are there any specific brands that I should be keeping my eye out for?

I'll look into the tips- even I can tell that the tips on these cues aren't the highest quality :wink:


Hey man welcome to the site.

The best way to go is go to a billiard supply store, they should have a large range of cues with different specs to try, find something you like i would reccommend brands like mcdermott,viking,players.

JDP12
05-08-2009, 04:25 PM
Yea... I dunno I like the table alot though.

Well do you think i should go and hit some cues before I purchase one? It seems important, but maybe not.. thoughts?


Also i have a question on the game FARGO. I get how you get points (1 point for random, 2 for rotation) but what happens if you miss a ball? Is that a penalty? Because otherwise you could score the same every time even if your ratio was three hits for every one ball. So is there a penalty or way to take care of that issue?

Just curious....

Thanks for the outstanding replies I've gotten, less than two hours after I posted.

JDP

tigerseye
05-08-2009, 06:54 PM
hey all- just thought I would say hello, first post and all.

I just started playing pool seriously about a month ago, and play as much as time allows with school. I've been playing with a cue that came with our pool table, a Brunswick.

I'm nowhere near good enough to be needing a dedicated cue, but I just thought I would pose this question because my birthday is coming up in a few months...

When would you consider oneself good enough to need to buy a cue?
Is a break/jump cue really needed in the beginning? I'm guessing not...but was just wondering.

So just wanted to pose those two, I consider the first more important of a question than the latter.

Thanks,

JDP



You are good enough now to buy a nice cue.... I would suggest not to throw out big bucks for a cue right away because dollar value does not determine the best cue for you....
I believe in a break cue because it will save the tip on your shooting cue...

Hope this helps and Welcome to the Forumn:welcome:

slide13
05-08-2009, 08:10 PM
I do not feel there is any certain level someone should attain before getting a cue. Frankly, I suck, but I like playing with a nice cue. If I'm going to spend hours at the table trying to better my game I might as well do it with a nice cue that I truly enjoy playing with.

Honestly, I do feel a little awkward showing up with my Whitten case, Olney cue, dedicated break and jump cue when I have very limited skills to back it up. But I'm also of the personality type that I like to have nice things, I acknowledge that they won't make me a better player, but I enjoy my experience more with them and I can rest assured knowing that no matter what my equipment isn't what is holding my game back.

Try a few out if you get a chance and pick up the cue that just feels right to you.

CreeDo
05-08-2009, 11:24 PM
This might seem a bit controversial, but the difference between a straight house cue with a good tip and a thousand dollar cue is surprisingly small. Good shooting comes from the player. I am using a brunswick cue and I like the hit. I've also spent about 10 years hitting with one or two favorite house cues and run several racks every night with them.

Don't get sucked into thinking you need to buy a cue, or need to get an expensive one. Spend your money on instructional books and DVDs and I promise you'll shoot 10x better than spending the same money on a nice cue.

grindz
05-09-2009, 09:09 AM
This might seem a bit controversial, but the difference between a straight house cue with a good tip and a thousand dollar cue is surprisingly small. Good shooting comes from the player. I am using a brunswick cue and I like the hit. I've also spent about 10 years hitting with one or two favorite house cues and run several racks every night with them.

Don't get sucked into thinking you need to buy a cue, or need to get an expensive one. Spend your money on instructional books and DVDs and I promise you'll shoot 10x better than spending the same money on a nice cue.

Well said................

Another .02 cents.......... Get yourself a cue when you have on 3-5 (you pick) different occassions, run a 2 pack.. break and run out, break and run out.. any game. By that time you will have confidence in using a house cue, and your game will be getting up to speed. It will also give you the drive to learn the game first ... with your eye on the prize.

The above advice is the best so far IMO. There are some FANTASTIC instructional videos and books out there!

td

Patrick Johnson
05-09-2009, 10:18 AM
Just keep playing for a few weeks and see if you start getting really hooked

This sounds right to me. It's never too early to get your own cue, but it's not worth it if you're not going to stick with the game.

It's also true that you don't need to spend a ton of money. Get a plain-looking stick ("sneaky petes" are good choices) at first. Go for the bling later if you want.

pj
chgo

deadwhak
05-09-2009, 10:28 AM
Hey JDP, Welcome to the pool world I hope you have fun with it. I understand you are a begginner but I am sure that I can help you get a feel for the game and its ins and outs. The best way I think is if you and I get together and play a couple of $100 sets and when you start seeing improvement we can move up to maybe $500 sets. I have no problem spending the whole day or even weekend helping you work on your game like this. Unlike some of these other pool schools like the Legends and Champions Pool Tour I will not charge you an hourly rate or anything. Please let me know as I am eager to help,:)
Mark :D :D

thats mighty nice of u bfdlad...i think u will need an assistant so i demand i get half of anything that u are lucky enuff to earn...

JDP12
05-09-2009, 12:23 PM
OK, so I've basically gathered here that a cue right now isn't an instant necessity, but one I should be looking at relatively soon.

What about the break? Should I just get a fairly cheap one- I think i recall someone posting about some that run around 60 bucks or so?

Also, can anyone answer the question I posted on the FARGO game??

DogsPlayingPool
05-09-2009, 12:55 PM
You don't need to reach a certain level to get your own cue. Get one now, it will help you. As long as you think you want to take the game seriously and improve, having your own stick will help you. It doesn't have to be a lot of money, even $100 for your first stick is OK. The benefit of having your own cue right away is that it allows you to play with the SAME stick every time, rather than having a strange and unfamiliar house cue in your hand every time you play. I think this is important for a beginner. In fact, I wouldn't advise spending much more than that on your first stick since you are likely to upgrade or change your preferences once you're in the game a little while-so why invest a lot of cash in your first stick?

There are plenty to choose from and you can find them on this board.

"rackem" sells import cues that are straight and actually pretty nice looking for $100. Look him up in the members list and shoot him a PM. Here's a link to one of of his offerings: http://forums.azbilliards.com/showthread.php?t=134142

There are other guys around here that can help you out as well.

Just play with enough house cues so that you have decided on what weight feels comfortable to you, then go out and get a cheap stick for yourself.

On break cues, don't worry about that now. Many guys who have been playing for years still just grab a house cue to break. I wouldn't even worry about a break cue until you have found a playing cue you plan on staying with for a while, and that probably won't be your first stick, so a break cue is a purchase you can easily put off for a while.

Hope this helps.

JDP12
05-09-2009, 01:11 PM
Ok thanks.. I'll look at those cues.

Do you know the answer to my FARGO question earlier on the first page of this thread??

I'm dying to know before I start counting scores of that

Patrick Johnson
05-09-2009, 09:58 PM
Also i have a question on the game FARGO. I get how you get points (1 point for random, 2 for rotation) but what happens if you miss a ball? Is that a penalty?

The "penalty" is that's the end of that rack.

pj
chgo

Cameron Smith
05-09-2009, 10:03 PM
hey all- just thought I would say hello, first post and all.

I just started playing pool seriously about a month ago, and play as much as time allows with school. I've been playing with a cue that came with our pool table, a Brunswick.

I'm nowhere near good enough to be needing a dedicated cue, but I just thought I would pose this question because my birthday is coming up in a few months...

When would you consider oneself good enough to need to buy a cue?
Is a break/jump cue really needed in the beginning? I'm guessing not...but was just wondering.

So just wanted to pose those two, I consider the first more important of a question than the latter.

Thanks,

JDP

There is no necessary skill level for owning a two piece cue. In fact a decent cue will actually have a positive impact on your game. A well balanced cue makes it significantly easier to develop a straight stroke.

Formula7
05-09-2009, 10:26 PM
I agree with all the above posts.. This is a little off topic but anyways you might want to pick up a book on billiards basics or surround yourself with good players I say this because alot of us wish we could go back to the beginning and change our bad habits (stroke, stance, routine) now might be a good time to learn the proper bridge stance stroke ect. before it gets to hard to change bad habits without getting worse first.

So... let's talk about the bold.

Be very careful when looking for these players. Pool does a strange thing to the ego if one is not careful. I've seen many a C proclaim A and get robbed blind due to their own confidence in the lies they've convinced themselves of. I also tell this because I'm shoot at a local bar every once in a while when I'm broke or I feel like I want to feel the forgiveness of a generous 8 ft with looser pockets, or because I enjoy playing for things like Irish Car Bombs. :thumbup: (Not to mention the fact that they recently got new cloth on the tables so it's no longer unbearable to play.

Anyhow. I spend a lot of time lurking on here and watching videos on Youtube. I've figured out the true definition of a good player (or at least something close). This made finding a good instructor a better experience. Unfortunately, for my poor pal, this was not the case. When you play in a little pond and only use the fish in that little pond as your standard, it can mess you up a bit. Sure those Koi can go on 3-4 ball runs and are pretty good matches, but they are nothing compared to the bass you can find in the whole lake (if that makes any sense :o). My friend is starting to pick up ideas from these guys such as, "Don't play so slow, the slower you play, the dumber you look." or "Saftey play is for *insert vulgarity here*." even things like "English is soooooo useless."

Just be very careful if you take the surround yourself with good shooters route. It can be harmful to your development.

And remember if they say things like,
"Straight pool and one pocket are pretty much the same game."
or they tell everyone that you are their prodigy after playing with you only once and other things along those lines, take extra caution.

Okay, maybe it's not THAT bad... then again... anything is possible, I've seen all these things. But, don't worry, as long as you keep up around here, and watch a lot of pros play, and also the great instructional videos out there (Monk, iPAT, etc.) you'll learn right from wrong in no time.

Good luck and can't wait to hear your triumphant stories of progress, especially your first break and run. I just got mine a week or so ago and it feel grrrrrrreat!

JDP12
05-10-2009, 08:01 AM
OK thanks for the advice.... Hopefully I'll run a rack soon :D

I was playing last night against some friends who had absolutely no idea how to play pool... Funny that the whole idea of who you surround yourself with was brought up....

They wouldn't let me play anymore after a couple games because then their "hit it as hard as you can strategy" wasn't working out for them...

But they let me back in and it was really interesting and challenging to play a game where the opponent just hit balls and didn't really care about making them, it really kept me on my toes and thinking about what to do next.

sde
05-10-2009, 08:29 AM
OK, so I've basically gathered here that a cue right now isn't an instant necessity, but one I should be looking at relatively soon.

What about the break? Should I just get a fairly cheap one- I think i recall someone posting about some that run around 60 bucks or so?

Also, can anyone answer the question I posted on the FARGO game??

Here are a couple of links for you that should answer all your questions about the game Fargo.

This is Mike Page,the inventor of Fargo, explaining and demonstrating the game.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CHj6KUw8xzE

and the rules
http://pro9.co.uk/html/RulesFargo.php


Steve

here you can find a score sheet with rules
http://forums.azbilliards.com/showthread.php?t=135294&highlight=fargo+rules

CreeDo
05-10-2009, 08:51 AM
Yeah, it's kind of a fun feeling when your skill level passes all the buddies you used to play with. I can't imagine playing with the guys who got me into pool originally. It'd be senseless slaughter. But there is a danger of having a hard time getting a game.

In terms of watching who you play with... I think the biggest danger you'll have (aside from gambling when you shouldn't be) is getting bad advice from wannabes. Like... I tend to think I'm full of good advice. But I'd spit on the advice I was giving to people 4 or 5 years ago =) I mean, some advice you get on how to shoot and what to do will be good, but a lot of it will be bad, and how will you be able to tell the difference? Basically, you should be wary of anyone who doesn't run at least one rack of 8 ball or 9 ball every session. Those are the guys who will tell you to snap your tip down and flick your wrist to get draw, or try full table banks instead of a long cut.

That's why I'm a big fan of books, because generally you're not going to find bad advice in the major pool books out there. There might be one or two minor things to quibble with but mostly it's gonna be solid gold.

Formula7
05-10-2009, 09:30 AM
Yeah, it's kind of a fun feeling when your skill level passes all the buddies you used to play with. I can't imagine playing with the guys who got me into pool originally. It'd be senseless slaughter. But there is a danger of having a hard time getting a game.

In terms of watching who you play with... I think the biggest danger you'll have (aside from gambling when you shouldn't be) is getting bad advice from wannabes. Like... I tend to think I'm full of good advice. But I'd spit on the advice I was giving to people 4 or 5 years ago =) I mean, some advice you get on how to shoot and what to do will be good, but a lot of it will be bad, and how will you be able to tell the difference? Basically, you should be wary of anyone who doesn't run at least one rack of 8 ball or 9 ball every session. Those are the guys who will tell you to snap your tip down and flick your wrist to get draw, or try full table banks instead of a long cut.

That's why I'm a big fan of books, because generally you're not going to find bad advice in the major pool books out there. There might be one or two minor things to quibble with but mostly it's gonna be solid gold.

SPeaking of books, every time I go into book stores I never find anything on pool. Or if I do it's far away from the sports section and in the games section. I'd like to think it's a sport. Football and basketball players may argue with me, but I'd like to say their jock straps are a little to tight.

Anyhow, I am guessing buying online would probably the best and almost the only route to take, no?

Pushout
05-10-2009, 11:01 AM
SPeaking of books, every time I go into book stores I never find anything on pool. Or if I do it's far away from the sports section and in the games section. I'd like to think it's a sport. Football and basketball players may argue with me, but I'd like to say their jock straps are a little to tight.

Anyhow, I am guessing buying online would probably the best and almost the only route to take, no?

Any Barnes and Noble I've been to in the last several years always has pool books. In the games section, yes. Also, as DoubleD said, used book stores can be a gold mine of stuff, if you look and/or ask for stuff you can't find. Unfortunately, they are few and far between in SC. I did find a book I read about in the early '80s at a yard sale yesterday:thumbup: "Billiards Accuracy" by Marvin Chin.
I've collected, bought, sold, traded, books for over thirty years. I found my current copy of McGoorty in a used books store. Found a book on Backgammon that I'd been looking for about twenty years.

JDP12
05-10-2009, 06:14 PM
LOL, yea my friends aren't very good.

Granted I'm by no means good at all yet. I can play pretty good, but I still miss my share of shots and haven't ran a rack yet.

Until I'm running racks I really won't consider myself to be good.

I miss easy shots that I should make and aren't too good at table long shots. My philosophy is basically going to be practice as much as i can. I haven't done FARGO yet... but my score would suck... maybe like 5-8 a rack.

Thanks for all the great support and tips I've gotten from all of you

CreeDo
05-10-2009, 06:21 PM
The pool book situation in most stores pisses me off. This is a sore spot for me. Borders puts pool books... not with sports... not with games... but in GAMBLING. Next to poker etc.

You can see their thinking, but for god's sake ...they just need to think like a normal human being. A customer is going to think game or sport long before gambling... if he EVER thinks to look there. DURRR. I move the entire set of pool books (all five of them, zzz) to the games and sports sections every time. I think at some point they finally got the hint.

Waldenbooks simply didn't have a single book, I guess I should be thankful.

Order online, start with the 99 critical shots in pool by ray martin. I've seen it as low as 11 bucks on amazon.

JDP12
05-10-2009, 06:38 PM
yea that is annoying... when I go to the library its the same thing- they are all next to poker books.


Also, I have a curiosity question for you... about English..and bridges..

How often do you use it? Do you use it to make shots at all? I try and avoid using it...but I find it a pretty helpful tool when having to make severe cut shots.

is this a bad thing to use english to make shots? Am I relying on it too much and not on aiming?

Also regarding bridges...I find myself using the open bridge more because I cannot really get a good solid bridge with a closed bridge. I've read alot about the closed bridge being the better bridge, but is there anything wrong with the open bridge if it works? Or should I learn to use a closed bridge early on
Just wondering...