PDA

View Full Version : Osage Orange


ftgokie
06-22-2009, 11:31 AM
I have 4 Osage Orange (Bodark) or horseapple trees on my property. I was wondering if this wood is good for a cue? Anyone have any ideas/thoughts on this wood?

JoeW
06-22-2009, 11:47 AM
My son-in-law is a woodsman. We also have Osage Orange trees. He cut a few and used them to make replicas of indian bows (as in bows and arrows).

Apparently some indian tribes preferred this wood for their bows. He also cut a few logs that were about six feet long and then split to 4-6 inch billits. After several trials he had 8-10 pieces that were used to make bows. He also sold some logs to a company in Oregon or Washington for about $90.00 each.

People who make bows find them quite valuable if they are straight grained. While $90.00 per log sounds impressive note that they are difficult to work with. If you search the net for hand made bows and then contact a few people you can probably sell the logs.

Apparently, the indians liked the spring in this type of wood so it probably does not make a good pool cue.

At one time Osage Orange was used by farmers to make hedgerow fences and there are many such fence rows around the country.

s'portplayer
06-22-2009, 11:56 AM
I Just saw a Jensen cue in the for sale section that was made out of Osage Orange and Bill Schick made an all Osage Orange cue.

Those are the only two that I know of.

eezbank
06-22-2009, 11:56 AM
I had a cue made for me by Wayne Holmes out of Osage Orange. I loved the way the cue looked under the light. It just had a bright glow about it. I'll include a pic of the butt.

ftgokie
06-22-2009, 12:06 PM
My son-in-law is a woodsman. We also have Osage Orange trees. He cut a few and used them to make replicas of indian bows (as in bows and arrows).

Apparently some indian tribes preferred this wood for their bows. He also cut a few logs that were about six feet long and then split to 4-6 inch billits. After several trials he had 8-10 pieces that were used to make bows. He also sold some logs to a company in Oregon or Washington for about $90.00 each.

People who make bows find them quite valuable if they are straight grained. While $90.00 per log sounds impressive note that they are difficult to work with. If you search the net for hand made bows and then contact a few people you can probably sell the logs.

Apparently, the indians liked the spring in this type of wood so it probably does not make a good pool cue.

At one time Osage Orange was used by farmers to make hedgerow fences and there are many such fence rows around the country.

Yea....my cousin makes homemade bows....he has taken a few limbs from one of my trees and made a bow with it....its a really nice bow....and you are correct....the indians did use Bodark to make bows.....I am 1/128th Cherokee indian :thumbup: so I pretty much know all about that stuff....:duck:

12squared
06-22-2009, 12:06 PM
I Just saw a Jensen cue in the for sale section that was made out of Osage Orange and Bill Schick made an all Osage Orange cue.

Those are the only two that I know of.

I have used an old Jensen Osage Orage cue (forearm & buttsleeve, never removed the wrap to see if it's one piece) for a couple years 10 or so yrs ago, traded it away for construction work that went over budget, and I just got it back in a trade. It hits really great. If I remember correctly, Mike of Jensen cues, really liked using this wood because of how well it hits and feels, but that was at least 10-12 years ago so my memory could be off a little, but not much. I would suggest contacting Mike and asking him why he likes using that wood.

It's purty too!

Dave

ftgokie
06-22-2009, 12:08 PM
And yes..I seen the cue made from Bodark in the for sale section...it has a very nice color to it....just wondering how it holds up...I know it will ruin your chainsaw blade if you cut much of a Bodark tree....its like cutting steel

s'portplayer
06-22-2009, 12:17 PM
Mr. Schick, told me it's the second toughest wood he's used in a cue.

ftgokie
06-22-2009, 12:31 PM
Mr. Schick, told me it's the second toughest wood he's used in a cue.

I have NO doubts about that one....I have had a dead bodark tree in my yard for 17yrs...with all the oklahoma storms, straight line winds, and close calls with tornados....there has not been 1 single twig fall off that tree.....I tried cutting a limb out of the tree that was hanging too close to the ground....I freaking ruined a brand new blade on my new Stihl chainsaw..Here is a picture of 1 Bodark tree in my yard....I also have 11 English Walnut, and 7 Black Walnut trees in my yard....I think it would be cool to make a cue out of some of the trees on my property....

Black-Balled
06-22-2009, 01:43 PM
iirc, THIS WOOD, LIKE MANY OTHERS IS HIGHLY TOXIC.

G-Dammm caps lock!

bob c
06-22-2009, 03:41 PM
Osage orange, bodark, bois d'arc also known as hedge or hedge apple is one tough wood. It is very close grained and generally unaffected by water which is one reason why it is a favorite wood for making duck and goose calls.

It is hard to work with and tough on tools but I would think its dimensional stability would make it an excellent wood for cue making. As it ages it develops a really nice but darker patina. I don't know to what extent this occurs when covered with modern finishes.

chevybob20
06-22-2009, 05:21 PM
A good amount of reliable info here, http://www.cuemaker.com/index.htm.

He even explains why.

manwon
06-22-2009, 06:01 PM
To use any of the wood from any of those tree's the entire tree would need to be taken down. The desired wood for cues is the Heart wood which is the center of the tree. Once the tree has been taken down the bark would bed to be removed, and I would also cut the Sap wood ( the wood directly under the bark that carrys water and Nutrients to the upper sections of the Tree as it grows) away. Once the heart wood is sectioned it can be taken to a processor and Kiln Dried or it can be waxed and stored for many years as it air dries.

This can be a very long drawn out process, and it will certainly be much much cheaper to buy some of this wood all ready dried and ready for use.

Just my thoughts:smile:

alstl
07-08-2009, 03:54 PM
Speaking of Osage Orange, I took this picture a few years ago. The tree is in front of the Daniel Bissel home in St Louis Country. The house was built around 1800 and people like Lewis & Clark and Daniel Boone were visitors.

When they cut this tree down and loaded it onto the bed of a flatbed truck it tipped the truck over. I had a chunk of wood from the tree but threw it away when I moved.

Big tree.

http://img13.imageshack.us/img13/9661/dsc00242d.th.jpg (http://img13.imageshack.us/i/dsc00242d.jpg/)

http://img38.imageshack.us/img38/4827/stump3.th.jpg (http://img38.imageshack.us/i/stump3.jpg/)

ftgokie
07-22-2009, 10:52 AM
Nice info there....yes, they are pretty big trees

hangemhigh
07-22-2009, 11:06 AM
If you never played with a cue made from Osage Orange, you would mistakenly assume it was not suitable for use is a cue. The opposite is true, the wood is a great candidate for a well playing cue. Finding a piece that is free of knots and twists in the grain is where the hard part comes into play. A piece that is tight and straight grained has excellent tonal qualities and makes a fine billiard instrument. The wood, when finished, has a iridescent glow in the sunlight. Here is a $CASH$ cue made with the highest quality Osage Orange. Enjoy:




http://i171.photobucket.com/albums/u313/hangem_high/002-12.jpg
http://i171.photobucket.com/albums/u313/hangem_high/004-12.jpg
http://i171.photobucket.com/albums/u313/hangem_high/001-13.jpg