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View Full Version : How to keep my shaft perfect?


jk36287
06-23-2009, 09:59 PM
My "new to me" predator shaft is without a doubt, the smoothest, and silkiest feeling shaft I've ever handled. Now my question is,
what can I do to make sure it stays that way for its whole life. Before I play, and before I even take it out of the case,
I wash my hands thoroughly, and after playing, I use my little brownish tweed looking sponge thing that you slide the shaft
through (it looks like you are pleasuring the shaft when you do it). So other than that, are there any methods or products that
will ensure it stays the way it is? I have a lathe that I do tip-work on so would that be of benefit for any methods?

thanks,
JK

poolplayer2093
06-24-2009, 01:00 AM
just don't use it. that'll take care of your problem. that's how i keep my car brand new

JESToner
06-24-2009, 02:28 AM
first of all, THROW AWAY THAT TWEED SHAFT DESTROYER!!!!
you're shaving away wood every time you use it, unless you are on a lathe, you are not acurately sanding away wood in all directions, meaning by sanding away wood by hand with one of those things or with a "green pad" you are essentially changing/ruining the taper of the shaft. not to mention every time you do this you are making your shaft a tiny bit smaller. a few nights a week, 4 weeks a month, etc. it REALLY adds up!


okay now on to methods of taking care of your shaft.
for blueing, i sugguest mr. clean magic eraser, it will clean it up super good without damaging it in any way.

to smooth out your shaft, i sugguest the Q-wiz, look it up, its my favorite shaft product so far, it takes off more dirt than wood, very very very very tiny bit of wood. if youve ever used one you will know what i mean. it gets your shaft smooth and almost glass-like.

i also keep a microfiber towel with me when i play, it is always sitting on the table or bench next to my drink, cigarettes, and cue case. after every turn i go back to my seat and wipe down my shaft before going to shoot, or ill wipe right before i go to the table.

hope that helped

JimS
06-24-2009, 03:24 AM
first of all, THROW AWAY THAT TWEED SHAFT DESTROYER!!!!
you're shaving away wood every time you use it, unless you are on a lathe, you are not acurately sanding away wood in all directions, meaning by sanding away wood by hand with one of those things or with a "green pad" you are essentially changing/ruining the taper of the shaft. not to mention every time you do this you are making your shaft a tiny bit smaller. a few nights a week, 4 weeks a month, etc. it REALLY adds up!


okay now on to methods of taking care of your shaft.
for blueing, i sugguest mr. clean magic eraser, it will clean it up super good without damaging it in any way.

to smooth out your shaft, i sugguest the Q-wiz, look it up, its my favorite shaft product so far, it takes off more dirt than wood, very very very very tiny bit of wood. if youve ever used one you will know what i mean. it gets your shaft smooth and almost glass-like.

i also keep a microfiber towel with me when i play, it is always sitting on the table or bench next to my drink, cigarettes, and cue case. after every turn i go back to my seat and wipe down my shaft before going to shoot, or ill wipe right before i go to the table.

hope that helped

The Q Wiz is very abrasive. It removes quite a bit of wood. Notice how white the abrasive side gets. That's wood powder.

I recommend that after using the shaft clean it with denatured alcohol and a rag, and then burnish with a leather pad.

When the shaft starts to show some blue you can put it in the lathe and us the Mr. Clean Magic eraser followed by just a quick touch up with 4000 Micro Mesh cloth followed by 6000 grit micro mesh followed by leather burnishing.

The shaft will stay as smooth as it is now. This is the process I've used for several years and it works great. I should also say that I'm not an expert nor am I a cue maker... just a guy who has experimented and followed the recommendations of cue makers and would up with this process.

D_Lewis
06-24-2009, 03:25 AM
first of all, THROW AWAY THAT TWEED SHAFT DESTROYER!!!!
you're shaving away wood every time you use it, unless you are on a lathe, you are not acurately sanding away wood in all directions, meaning by sanding away wood by hand with one of those things or with a "green pad" you are essentially changing/ruining the taper of the shaft. not to mention every time you do this you are making your shaft a tiny bit smaller. a few nights a week, 4 weeks a month, etc. it REALLY adds up!


okay now on to methods of taking care of your shaft.
for blueing, i sugguest mr. clean magic eraser, it will clean it up super good without damaging it in any way.

to smooth out your shaft, i sugguest the Q-wiz, look it up, its my favorite shaft product so far, it takes off more dirt than wood, very very very very tiny bit of wood. if youve ever used one you will know what i mean. it gets your shaft smooth and almost glass-like.

i also keep a microfiber towel with me when i play, it is always sitting on the table or bench next to my drink, cigarettes, and cue case. after every turn i go back to my seat and wipe down my shaft before going to shoot, or ill wipe right before i go to the table.

hope that helped


For a person suggesting a magic eraser you're pretty hard on the guy for using one of those brown pads. The magic eraser is VERY abrasive also.

I have a guy who strips, burnishes and reseals my 314-2 about 6 times a year. For $10 a month it keeps me happy.

chevybob20
06-24-2009, 03:32 AM
I need to keep my shaft as clean and smooth as possible. I have sweaty hands and I hate the sticky feel when the cue gets dirty. I have tried everything from Cue Slick to Butchers Bowling Alley Wax. The best thing for your shaft is nothing.

Clean the shaft with a Majic Eraser. Burnish the shaft with a piece of leather immediatly after. I use Porpers leather burnishing leather.

If you absolutely have to sand the shaft, like just after you remove a ding, use very fine sand paper. I use Nick Varners Edge to fill this need.

Wash your hands regularly and keep a towel with you to wipe the shaft often.

sascha
06-24-2009, 04:07 AM
try a wet towel, not too wet just a little and then rub it dry...looks brand new, tip comes from mr souquet himself :-)

poolplayer2093
06-24-2009, 04:15 AM
try a wet towel, not too wet just a little and then rub it dry...looks brand new, tip comes from mr souquet himself :-)

i hear alcohol works

gulyassy
06-24-2009, 04:27 AM
My "new to me" predator shaft is without a doubt, the smoothest, and silkiest feeling shaft I've ever handled. Now my question is,
what can I do to make sure it stays that way for its whole life. Before I play, and before I even take it out of the case,
I wash my hands thoroughly, and after playing, I use my little brownish tweed looking sponge thing that you slide the shaft
through (it looks like you are pleasuring the shaft when you do it). So other than that, are there any methods or products that
will ensure it stays the way it is? I have a lathe that I do tip-work on so would that be of benefit for any methods?

thanks,
JK
Shaft Freeze will keep your shaft slick and keep it from turning blue, with no cleaning or sanding. mike@babysproshop.com 864-458-7662

Blackjack
06-24-2009, 04:45 AM
I use my little brownish tweed looking sponge thing that you slide the shaft
through

Throw that thing in the trash. Over time, it will turn your shaft into a toothpick. Listen to Mike - use Shaft Freeze.

JE54
06-24-2009, 04:59 AM
When using the Magic Eraser, do you use anything with it?

Donny
06-24-2009, 06:52 AM
My "new to me" predator shaft is without a doubt, the smoothest, and silkiest feeling shaft I've ever handled. Now my question is,
what can I do to make sure it stays that way for its whole life. Before I play, and before I even take it out of the case,
I wash my hands thoroughly, and after playing, I use my little brownish tweed looking sponge thing that you slide the shaft
through (it looks like you are pleasuring the shaft when you do it). So other than that, are there any methods or products that
will ensure it stays the way it is? I have a lathe that I do tip-work on so would that be of benefit for any methods?

thanks,
JK

I use the Q-Wiz cleaning pads and they work really well. I also recommend you give your shaft a more thorough cleaning about once every 2 - 4 weeks, using some Pumice Hand Cleaner. You can buy a small container for a few bucks at your local auto parts store. It's great for getting all of the chalk and grime and the other nasty stuff that accumulates thickly in your shaft over time. http://www.samsclub.com/shopping/navigate.do?dest=5&item=200723

mdavis228
06-24-2009, 07:05 AM
Mizerak wrote somewhere (I forget) a tip I've used for years. If your shaft feels a little funky when you're about to use it, rub it with some folded over crisp paper money. Very low abrasion, takes off a little of the gunk, and Steve claimed there was something about the ink - don't know about that... But it will leave your shaft feeling glass smooth. Higher denominations don't really do a better job, but you could try...

NewStroke
06-24-2009, 08:06 AM
My Grandfather showed me that using lighter fluid keeps the shaft super clean. Not enough to get the wood wet but it cleans well. Then I use about 1000 grit sandpaper and after that rub the shaft down with an index card.

ctyhntr
06-24-2009, 08:13 AM
This is my basic shaft cleaning check list.

1. magic eraser dampen with alcohol
2. shaft paper
3. burnish with leather or brown paper bag

If magic eraser isn't marketed in your country, go to any place that supply speaker supplies and look for melamine foam. Magic Eraser is melamine foam. Most shaft paper are repackaged 3M brand wet/dry sandpaper in 2000, 4000, 6000 or 8000 grit.

themack
06-24-2009, 10:27 AM
I don't mean to go off-topic on the original poster but, does that Shaft Freeze give the shaft that glossy coating? The kind like a cuetec comes with. I am interested in the coating, but if it gives the feel of a cuetec shaft then i am not interested, as that coating is the stickiest thing known to man.

Vinnie
06-24-2009, 10:43 AM
How to keep my shaft perfect?

Don't get married.





just kidding. What I find works for me is denatured alcohol and then barnish with a piece of non-died leather as some others have suggested.

Rich93
06-24-2009, 10:49 AM
First of all, Magic Eraser is not "very abrasive" like a previous poster said. The particles you feel after using it are tiny pieces of the eraser itself, not wood. Used as directed, it is not abrasive at all (people clean their painted walls with this stuff). In any event, it is not something that you should do too often - a couple of times a year, maybe, in order to remove the blue. I follow it up by using the two least abrasive Cue Smooth papers, and it's like you have a new shaft - almost.

To keep the shaft feeling smooth through your fingers, Ray Schuler recommended using a slightly damp rag, followed up by a vigorous rubbing with a dry towel. It does not remove much of the blue but it does make the shaft feel smooth. I never had a problem with a shaft warping with these treatments, but the problem is that it doesn't last all that long before you have to do it again. Most posters on this board will tell you never to use water. Well, what can I say? I never had a problem myself.

I liked the SlipStik product to give it a longer lasting smooth feel, but they're now out of business. However, I did manage to buy a lifetime supply (lifetime, considering that I'm 61) of their combo product and I use that every few weeks. If I didn't have that I would use the Schuler damp rag treatment.

Finally, if you're hands sweat in a game and you need something right away, there's always powder. My hands sometimes sweat, and when that happens I use a little rosin bag type powder dispenser sparingly - just where the cue slides.

crawfish
06-24-2009, 10:54 AM
My dear boy, the right woman will keep your shaft in tip-top shape. I've never thought of using sandpaper on my shaft. Is this a new trend? Doesn't it hurt? And then alcohol? Did I fu@# up and go on an S & M site? You people are sick.

samsarakid24
06-24-2009, 11:36 AM
I have used alot of things over the years like most of us and have always been curious myself as to what does actually work best ???
After a long trial and error process to find something that actually does what it claims I stumbled across this product last year at the 2008
Valley Forge Expo. This product is by far the best product I have ever used personally to keep your shafts feeling like new with that Ultra smooth surface that I have yet to obtain using anything else without any damage to the shaft. I still clean the shafts on a regular basis with a lathe and shaft cleaner but to keep the shafts conditioned and smooth as glass I only use these now. They are not expensive IMO, can be washed and reused and last a very long time. I highly recommend these to anybody wanting a great product to keep your shafts in Top Shape.

P.S. - I have no affiliation with this Company or product in any way.

http://www.poolndarts.com/p-7942-Magic-Mesh/

Thanks..............Paul

oneshotwiss
06-24-2009, 12:08 PM
Clean it with "Shark Oil" after about every other time you play then burnish with leather. I do and my Predator looks as good as the day I bought it...

D_Lewis
06-24-2009, 12:14 PM
First of all, Magic Eraser is not "very abrasive" like a previous poster said. The particles you feel after using it are tiny pieces of the eraser itself, not wood. Used as directed, it is not abrasive at all (people clean their painted walls with this stuff). In any event, it is not something that you should do too often - a couple of times a year, maybe, in order to remove the blue. I follow it up by using the two least abrasive Cue Smooth papers, and it's like you have a new shaft - almost.


That would be me.

Try using a magic eraser on something with a shine to it and tell me its not abrasive when the shine is gone.

:)

rayjay
06-24-2009, 12:16 PM
Here's the secret formula...

1. magic eraser to completely take off the blueing, then wipe down with clean paper towel to get rid of most of the magic eraser gunk.
2. Bono Organic Hardwood Floor Cleaner sprayed on a clean paper towel, wipe down the shaft, then wipe down with clean paper towel to get a perfectly clean shaft. Let sit for at least 15 minutes.
3. Then, on your lathe only, use MicroMesh...quick, smooth passes with 4000, 6000, 8000, then polish with 12000. Use Slipstik if you want, but at this point it's not necessary.

Like others have said, throw away the scotch plaid polisher thingy. This may be overkill, but that's how I like it and I've never seen better.
:p

nksmfamjp
06-24-2009, 12:27 PM
IMO. . .
Qclean to clean it.
Qsmooth to sand it slightly.
then Qwax to seal it all in. To me Qwax is proabably the most important part of this process.

Rich93
06-24-2009, 12:45 PM
That would be me.

Try using a magic eraser on something with a shine to it and tell me its not abrasive when the shine is gone.

:)

Well, when you're right, you're right.

The manufacturer of the substance from which Magic Eraser is made says "Only surfaces liable to scratching and varnished surfaces should not be cleaned with the “magician”.

It does remove the shine from the bottom few inches of a pool shaft if you use it down there (where the shaft maker applies a butt-like finish). I have experienced this myself. So it is abrasive to this degree.

But what I would say is this. To remove the blue with normal abrasives (sandpaper, steel wool, etc.), you are taking off a lot more wood than removing the blue with ME. It seems a lot more efficient in getting to the blue and taking it out without losing wood than any other product I've found.

D_Lewis
06-24-2009, 12:55 PM
Well, when you're right, you're right.

The manufacturer of the substance from which Magic Eraser is made says "Only surfaces liable to scratching and varnished surfaces should not be cleaned with the “magician”.

It does remove the shine from the bottom few inches of a pool shaft if you use it down there (where the shaft maker applies a butt-like finish). I have experienced this myself. So it is abrasive to this degree.

But what I would say is this. To remove the blue with normal abrasives (sandpaper, steel wool, etc.), you are taking off a lot more wood than removing the blue with ME. It seems a lot more efficient in getting to the blue and taking it out without losing wood than any other product I've found.

I was unfortunate enough to use a magic eraser on a pair of shoes and learned the hard way.

My cue guy uses it on my ferrule and it makes it look great!

jk36287
06-24-2009, 02:11 PM
so on the shaft alone (predator z2) , is the non-glossy portion just bare wood or is it the same finish as the glossy bottom of the shaft, but just sanded/burnished to give a smooth feel? I would think that the shaft being bare wood vs finished wood will be two completley different situations you know?

KillerCane
06-24-2009, 02:20 PM
beltsander?

jensen_lover
06-24-2009, 02:51 PM
Go to autozone and pick up the highest grit sandpaper you can find. It is used for buffing paint on cars or something. Watch the heat around the ferrule though because it get ruined. For your ferrule you can put whitening toothpaste on it to make it look as white as Ivory.

SCCues
06-24-2009, 03:17 PM
I have used alot of things over the years like most of us and have always been curious myself as to what does actually work best ???
After a long trial and error process to find something that actually does what it claims I stumbled across this product last year at the 2008
Valley Forge Expo. This product is by far the best product I have ever used personally to keep your shafts feeling like new with that Ultra smooth surface that I have yet to obtain using anything else without any damage to the shaft. I still clean the shafts on a regular basis with a lathe and shaft cleaner but to keep the shafts conditioned and smooth as glass I only use these now. They are not expensive IMO, can be washed and reused and last a very long time. I highly recommend these to anybody wanting a great product to keep your shafts in Top Shape.

P.S. - I have no affiliation with this Company or product in any way.

http://www.poolndarts.com/p-7942-Magic-Mesh/

Thanks..............Paul

How are you doing Paul?

Thanks for the link to the Magic Mesh shaft conditioning pads. I've been using these for years. I keep one (the finest grit pad) in my pocket when i'm playing and I can rub my shaft lightly if it feels sticky from hand moisture or chalk build up. You can wash the pad and continue to use it over and over.

I agree with Paul these pads are some of the best shaft products i've used and i've tried many different products. I have a cue lathe at my home, but you don't have to have a lathe to get the benefit of these fine pads.

James

Tbeaux
06-24-2009, 04:11 PM
Cloth dampened with denature alcohol works good.

Another method for cleaning is to use a barely damp cloth with toothpaste. Once the toothpaste is removed use newspaper or a dollar bill to polish. Newspaper and dollar bills are approximately as abrasive as fine micromesh (old aviation trick used for polishing scratched wind screens).

Shaft
06-24-2009, 06:31 PM
Your shaft will need cleaning less often if you
1. chalk carefully and
2. use a glove.

MitchAlsup
06-25-2009, 11:10 AM
I happen to have a 314 shaft 2 years old that you would be hard pressed to find any chalk residue (blueing).

I prepaired the shaft by giving it 6 coats of carnuba car wax (Mothers), working the wax down into the wood grain. This makes the shaft sliky smooth, and you can decrease the friction by giving the shaft a couple of strokes on the talc cube. {Note: the talc goes on the shaft not on your hand} Wash you hands evey 3 games, and this single talcing of the cue will last for 4-5 hours.

As others have said, chalk carefuly, brushing the chalk onto the tip with the cue positioned towards the horizontal, so the chalk dust settles away from the shaft.

Then every 4-6 weeks (or as needed) wet a cleaning cloth with one of the orange cleaners, stroke the shaft a few times, then hit the shaft with a (not dripping but) wet cloth to remove the detergent, and dry immediately with a dry towel, burnishing the wood grains as you dry {work some heat into the shaft as you burnish}. Another coat of wax and you are back in business.

My 314 shaft remains perfectly straight after 2 years of this treatment. I would not recommend this for shafts that are not composed of multiple sections of wood laminated together. Use at your own risk.

chin0
06-25-2009, 01:12 PM
just don't use it. that'll take care of your problem. that's how i keep my car brand new

I 2nd that, maybe someone 2nd it before me lol. Only way to keep a shaft perfect is to not play with it. Even being very carful while playing can still cause the ferrule, shaft to get blued, dings and scratches. I spend good money on an OB2 so I know how you feel, but enjoy the damn thing and go play with it. Just an honest opinion. Have fun!

Chino

rayjay
06-25-2009, 01:38 PM
Lathe isn't necessary. Just turn the cue a bit by hand in between strokes of the abrasive.

Sure, you can do it by hand, but eventually your shaft will look like an hourglass. If you use an abrasive, use a lathe for smooth, even results.
:p

9 on the snap
06-25-2009, 02:02 PM
My girlfriend takes care of my shaft, and she does a GREAT job, but I always tell her NO ABRASIVES!!!!:D

chin0
06-25-2009, 11:12 PM
I would suggest keeping a microfiber towel on you and wipe the shaft down after each time you play with it. Keep your hands clean, learn how to chalk right, and use the magic eraser for deep cleaning when needed. I also applu cue wax on my shafts and to me, this also helps a lot of the dirt off of it. But this is JMHO, many dislike wax, it is a love it or hate it thing. Butcher's bowling alley wax is good. Chem Pak wax is good as well. Stay away from anything like cue silk, I hate those products. To me, it makes the cue feel really sticky compare to it being smooth. lol

Good luck

Chino

rementis
06-25-2009, 11:19 PM
Take 1/2 cup of vinegar, 1/4 cup of lemon juice, 1 cup of water, a pinch of salt, mix. Now dump it all down the drain, throw your pool cue in the back of your closet and go bowling. After two weeks, take out the pool cue, and hit yourself in the face with it. LOL

rayjay
06-26-2009, 04:57 PM
yeah, check back with me in 78years or so and see if this comes true--I'll be the dead guy with a smooth shaft.

Seriously, tho, people put too much stock in needing equipment. Wash your hands, keep clean and when your shaft feels gross, wipe it down with high grit sandpaper. This final step should take 48sec.

There's a real fast easy way to find out...lay something flat and hard, like a ruler, on your shaft where you use the abrasive and look at it with a light behind it. You will see light in the low space where you sanded by hand. You won't even have to wait 78 days (or so), and you may even still be alive! The only way to avoid this is to not use an abrasive, just burnish with leather or something nonabrasive, or use a lathe.
:p

TX Poolnut
06-26-2009, 05:06 PM
Let's face it. Wood doesn't last forever. Wood just isn't a good fighter of time.

General wear and tear of wood is normal and should be expected. We should do all that we can to protect our wooden things, but the fact remains that wood will chip, ding, break, rot, bow, crack, etc.

The best thing to do is to enjoy your shafts and try to make them last. When you feel like it's time to get a new shaft, get one.

Dawgneck
06-27-2009, 08:09 AM
I've found the Magic Eraser was the safest and fastest "home" technique for cleaning the blue from my shaft.

I still have not found a faster or better solution.

If someone found a safer and faster "home" technique to clean deep embedded blue gunk from shafts, please share.

fastford
06-29-2009, 09:26 AM
what kind of leather do you use and where do you get it?