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sugeknight
03-11-2010, 11:55 PM
Born and raised, I've lived the past 26 years of my life in California, until recently.
Last September I got the chance to move to Bangkok, Thailand for a 1 year teaching contract. I happily accepted, but it came at a time when my game was really starting to improve.
I was taking lessons, and I was able to practice at least 5 times a week. I was really worried that I wouldn't be able to practice and play as much as I had been at home in California.
Well, its been about 6 months and truth be told, I haven't been able to play nearly as much as I was at home since my pool hall here is about a 45 minute commute and I have to take 2 different modes of public transportation to get there. But despite the inconveniences of travel and expenses, I still try to make the journey downtown 2-3 times a week.
On to the point of this post.
Since moving to Bangkok, my appreciation of our game has grown to a whole new level. I always knew that pool was played in every country around the world, but there is a difference between thinking that you know something and then experiencing it first hand.
Yesterday I went to play and had sets with gentlemen from Japan and Bangladesh. English wasn't spoken at the table. It wasn't possible. But we were able to communicate perfectly and even share a few laughs.
In just 6 short months I've meet and played with people from India, Austrailia, England, France, China, Dubai, Japan, of course Thailand and even AZ forumland. It's been a real pleasure and has given me a lot of hope for the future of our sport.
Regards,
suge

mike8or9
03-12-2010, 01:35 AM
I hope your contract is not for teaching English!

sugeknight
03-12-2010, 04:13 AM
I hope your contract is not for teaching English!

why is that mike8or9?

hivoltg
03-12-2010, 04:19 AM
why is that mike8or9?

I think Mike is a spelling/grammar Nazi:thumbup:

Tramp Steamer
03-12-2010, 06:50 AM
And what would that hope be, Mr. Knight? That one day we'll all be playing in the burned out rubble of a pool hall, amid the burned out rubble of a city that was laid to waste by those who failed to heed the lessons of the past? Where the promise of change brought only heartache and despair? I say pish, posh Mr. Knight.
Now, if you'll excuse me, I have to go to the bathroom. :grin:

sugeknight
03-12-2010, 07:03 AM
And what would that hope be, Mr. Knight? That one day we'll all be playing in the burned out rubble of a pool hall, amid the burned out rubble of a city that was laid to waste by those who failed to heed the lessons of the past? Where the promise of change brought only heartache and despair? I say pish, posh Mr. Knight.
Now, if you'll excuse me, I have to go to the bathroom. :grin:

WOW Mr. Tramp, you hit the nail right on its head :clapping:

tell me something, when you go to the bathroom.... whats it like to pee sitting down?

Tramp Steamer
03-12-2010, 07:06 AM
WOW Mr. Tramp, you hit the nail right on its head :clapping:

tell me something, when you go to the bathroom.... whats it like to pee sitting down?


The waters cold. :p

sugeknight
03-12-2010, 07:11 AM
The waters cold. :p

hahah. keep you head up Mr. Tramp and have a good day.

Tramp Steamer
03-12-2010, 07:42 AM
Don't get in a huff, Mr. Knight. I was only implying, through an admittedly brilliant bit of satirical humor, that the 'we are the world' crap is a facade. Just remember that two of those countries you mentioned own almost all of our debt, and one of them would just as soon turn our country in to a parking lot than argue over a barrel of oil, which is probably what's going to happen one of these days.

JoeyA
03-12-2010, 08:34 AM
Suge,

What a fantastic opportunity you have had! I am very happy for you. It is almost euphoric to be able to enjoy another person's company who shares the commonality of pool that you both have in common.

To share it with someone who doesn't speak your language has to be a most enjoyable experience.

How do the players from each country show their appreciation?
(Tap their cue, snap their fingers, simple nod of the head, tap their drink glass, tap their chalk or shout their appreciation for a good shot, etc.)

I would be most interested to know if there are any other forms of appreciation that you noticed. These are the types of things that are of most interest to me. Several years ago, once when Wei Chao came to New Orleans (the inventor of www.cuetable.com) I was making some good shots that day and I kept hearing this clicking noise everytime I made a really good shot while playing one pocket and finally I realized that it was Wei showing his appreciation by snapping his fingers sharply and it was my first time ever seeing or hearing it in person. It made me smile to learn something new and that shows the good side of our humanity all without speaking a word. Wei speaks English just fine but he brought that custom to New Orleans and it was fun for me to see and hear it firsthand.

Thanks,
JoeyA

PaulieB
03-12-2010, 08:37 AM
The waters cold. :p

And deep! :)

Tramp Steamer
03-12-2010, 09:09 AM
And deep! :)

And how! :D

sugeknight
03-12-2010, 09:20 AM
Don't get in a huff, Mr. Knight. I was only implying, through an admittedly brilliant bit of satirical humor, that the 'we are the world' crap is a facade. Just remember that two of those countries you mentioned own almost all of our debt, and one of them would just as soon turn our country in to a parking lot than argue over a barrel of oil, which is probably what's going to happen one of these days.

I was upset at first, but everyone is entitled to their own opinion and I can see where you're coming from.

Although the things you say may have some truth, and I can't say I disagree, the efforts of my post were to emphasise that on a pool table none of that political shit really seems to matter. At least not to the people Ive played. ethnicity doesnt matter. languages dont matter. religion doesnt matter. and I just wanted to write about how much I appreciate that aspect of our game.

Scott Lee
03-12-2010, 09:22 AM
Holy cow JoeyA! Snapping fingers to acknowledge a good shot is as old as the hills. It's hard to believe that as much as you get around, and as long as you've been around pool, you've never heard of that. The players were doing that 50 years ago in Johnston City (among every other place). IMO, it's always been extremely commonplace. Well...at least NOW you know about it.:grin:

Scott Lee
www.poolknowledge.com

Several years ago, once when Wei Chao came to New Orleans (the inventor of www.cuetable.com) I was making some good shots that day and I kept hearing this clicking noise everytime I made a really good shot while playing one pocket and finally I realized that it was Wei showing his appreciation by snapping his fingers sharply and it was my first time ever seeing or hearing it in person. It made me smile to learn something new and that shows the good side of our humanity all without speaking a word. Wei speaks English just fine but he brought that custom to New Orleans and it was fun for me to see and hear it firsthand.

Thanks,
JoeyA

Cuaba
03-12-2010, 09:36 AM
Suge,
Hopefully I'll see you again next month. I arrive right after Songkran.

Bangkok is a great town for pool. I agree with your post.

You need to get into one of our late-night ring games at Players. That will improve your game.

Tramp Steamer
03-12-2010, 09:41 AM
I was upset at first, but everyone is entitled to their own opinion and I can see where you're coming from.

Although the things you say may have some truth, and I can't say I disagree, the efforts of my post were to emphasise that on a pool table none of that political shit really seems to matter. At least not to the people Ive played. ethnicity doesnt matter. languages dont matter. religion doesnt matter. and I just wanted to write about how much I appreciate that aspect of our game.


Well said Suge, but I think it does matter. I cite the recent Olympics as an example. Sure, the athletes may have hung out with each other and drank Molson until the cows came home, but in the end it was all about who kicked whose ass on the ski slopes.
Enjoy your stay, then come back home where at least you'll know what it means when one of your buds call you a name.
And to JoeyA. How do you know Mr. Wei wasn't trying to get the barmaids attention? :smile:

sugeknight
03-12-2010, 09:42 AM
Suge,

What a fantastic opportunity you have had! I am very happy for you. It is almost euphoric to be able to enjoy another person's company who shares the commonality of pool that you both have in common.

To share it with someone who doesn't speak your language has to be a most enjoyable experience.

How do the players from each country show their appreciation?
(Tap their cue, snap their fingers, simple nod of the head, tap their drink glass, tap their chalk or shout their appreciation for a good shot, etc.)

I would be most interested to know if there are any other forms of appreciation that you noticed. These are the types of things that are of most interest to me. Several years ago, once when Wei Chao came to New Orleans (the inventor of www.cuetable.com) I was making some good shots that day and I kept hearing this clicking noise everytime I made a really good shot while playing one pocket and finally I realized that it was Wei showing his appreciation by snapping his fingers sharply and it was my first time ever seeing or hearing it in person. It made me smile to learn something new and that shows the good side of our humanity all without speaking a word. Wei speaks English just fine but he brought that custom to New Orleans and it was fun for me to see and hear it firsthand.

Thanks,
JoeyA


Hey Joey,
Its cool you bring that up. Maybe I havent noticed but it seems most guys Ive played will just remain silent or tap their cue just like back home, but I have seen a few give head nods.
Also there was one time I gave this Japanese guy the 9 ball because it was a straight in hanger. I didnt even think about what I was doing because at home its so common to just give that to your opponent, but maybe not in Japan? Im not really sure, I didnt ask. but he didnt look to thrilled after I said "thats good".

KoolKat9Lives
03-12-2010, 09:53 AM
And what would that hope be, Mr. Knight? That one day we'll all be playing in the burned out rubble of a pool hall, amid the burned out rubble of a city that was laid to waste by those who failed to heed the lessons of the past? Where the promise of change brought only heartache and despair? I say pish, posh Mr. Knight.
Now, if you'll excuse me, I have to go to the bathroom. :grin:

It's a cruel world, ain't it Tramp?

129367


BTW, I find your tale heartwarming SugeKnight. So there.

:D

sugeknight
03-12-2010, 10:00 AM
Well said Suge, but I think it does matter. I cite the recent Olympics as an example. Sure, the athletes may have hung out with each other and drank Molson until the cows came home, but in the end it was all about who kicked whose ass on the ski slopes.
Enjoy your stay, then come back home where at least you'll know what it means when one of your buds call you a name.
And to JoeyA. How do you know Mr. Wei wasn't trying to get the barmaids attention? :smile:

A more relevant example may have been the mosconi cup, since everyone knows that the real trophy is the bragging rights for the winning country.

but in the Olympics I cant imagine after years of training and dedication to a sport you love that in the end it all comes down to what country you beat.
You would think its about the individual or team athelete reaching their full potential and becoming the best in the world. Especially considering the fact that many Olympic sports have no higher reward than becoming a medalist or even an olympic representative for their small country.

sugeknight
03-12-2010, 10:02 AM
It's a cruel world, ain't it Tramp?

129367


BTW, I find your tale heartwarming SugeKnight. So there.

:D

you're a funny guy. thanks kool kat

Taco
03-12-2010, 10:48 AM
Don't get in a huff, Mr. Knight. I was only implying, through an admittedly brilliant bit of satirical humor, that the 'we are the world' crap is a facade. Just remember that two of those countries you mentioned own almost all of our debt, and one of them would just as soon turn our country in to a parking lot than argue over a barrel of oil, which is probably what's going to happen one of these days.

Confusing countries with their governments is the reason the USA was the most despised country in the world between 2000 and 2008, and probably still is, residually.

JoeyA
03-12-2010, 10:57 AM
Holy cow JoeyA! Snapping fingers to acknowledge a good shot is as old as the hills. It's hard to believe that as much as you get around, and as long as you've been around pool, you've never heard of that. The players were doing that 50 years ago in Johnston City (among every other place). IMO, it's always been extremely commonplace. Well...at least NOW you know about it.:grin:

Scott Lee
www.poolknowledge.com

I realize you travel far more than I do and since you are much older, you have vast experience to draw on. If only you could play pool. :D:D

JoeyA

Woof Biscuit
03-12-2010, 10:59 AM
I like beer.

JoeyA
03-12-2010, 11:01 AM
I really don't get some of you guys. Suge starts a nice pleasant thread about how pool makes a connection across ethnic lines, and even across nations and some of you have to find a way to piss in his cheerios.

Don't you have anything better to do with your time?
JoeyA

Taco
03-12-2010, 11:07 AM
I realize you travel far more than I do and since you are much older, you have vast experience to draw on. If only you could play pool. :D:D

JoeyA

A nice pleasant thread?

CreeDo
03-12-2010, 11:07 AM
I really don't get some of you guys. Suge starts a nice pleasant thread about how pool makes a connection across ethnic lines, and even across nations and some of you have to find a way to piss in his cheerios.

Don't you have anything better to do with your time?
JoeyA

Yeah, I was thinking the same thing. I hope suge doesn't get turned off of posting his experiences, I like to hear about overseas pool. I can see spelling nitpickery and political garbage anytime, there are a thousand guys on here who can 'contribute' that. Not so many can tell us about the pool scene in Thailand.

Tramp Steamer
03-12-2010, 11:09 AM
Confusing countries with their governments is the reason the USA was the most despised country in the world between 2000 and 2008, and probably still is, residually.

If we are so despised, why does eveyone in the world want to live here? Go to school here? Work here?
Why do Canadians come down for Medical care? Who was the first in to help out the Haitians.
Shame on you! I just hope John Wayne and Ronald Reagan isn't watching this. :p

Taco
03-12-2010, 11:11 AM
Yeah, I was thinking the same thing. I hope suge doesn't get turned off of posting his experiences, I like to hear about overseas pool. I can see spelling nitpickery and political garbage anytime, there are a thousand guys on here who can 'contribute' that. Not so many can tell us about the pool scene in Thailand.

Thailand, especially Bangkok, is a great pool scene.

poolhustler
03-12-2010, 11:38 AM
the world hates us... think I'll go kill myself now.....:(

Marie's husband
03-12-2010, 11:48 AM
sugeknight,

I understand what you are saying about a pool table and how it has a common language. I have traveled around the world at least three times since I have been in the Navy and at every port I seek out a pool table. Some really good times, in Korea where nobody could speak english and I found a billiards hall. I walked into this 16 table hall and the owner looked at me funny as I walked around to see if there was any Pool tables. Since there where no pool tables and I really didnt understand Billiards I was going to leave but the owner stopped me. He gestured to play billiards so I figured, why not, so me and the owner played Billiards and he had to show me the rules by pointing and grunting. I would also keep wanting to shoot the wrong ball and he would hit me with his cue when I tried to shoot, and just snicker at me while I laughed because Im not exactly a small guy. It was fun and it drew a pretty big crowd because an American was playing the owner and I actually beat him two games after I got the hang of it.

Singapore is a great place for pool also, Me and a buddy jumped into a cab and told the cab to take us to a pool hall. Well a block later, he dropped us off, boy did we feel dumb. Anyways, the pool hall was cool, 10-12 snooker tables upstairs and 6 9' pool tables downstairs with two more snooker tables. Well my buddy does play pool, but he likes drinking a little bit more so I told him I would buy his beer for the day if we just hang out at the pool hall. He jumped all over my offer and ordered two corona's and a shot. Oh, and by the way, I dont drink. So the owner sees him just chilling out drinking and asks if I want to play and of course I said yes. Well we played for a few hours and I ended up on top, but I figured I lost because there was no way it would cover my bar tab. So I go to pay for everything and the owner doesnt take my money and tell me to come back tomorrow and he will have some friends for me to play. I was thinking that he was going to get the local "top gun" to come down and whoop up on me.

So the next night my buddy and I show up and there are 6 guys waiting for us. Got me a little bit nervouse, but like I said before, I'm not exactly a small guy and neither is my buddy. So we are all standing there looking at one another without saying a word and I finally break the ice and say "so who am I playing first" and they all declined to play and then the owner spoke up. "hey, were not going to play, were going to take you two out on the town". Wow, what a different place singapore is when the locals are showing you around and paying for everything. fun fun fun.

I know it was long, but thanks for reading.

Taco
03-12-2010, 11:58 AM
sugeknight,

I understand what you are saying about a pool table and how it has a common language. I have traveled around the world at least three times since I have been in the Navy and at every port I seek out a pool table. Some really good times, in Korea where nobody could speak english and I found a billiards hall. I walked into this 16 table hall and the owner looked at me funny as I walked around to see if there was any Pool tables. Since there where no pool tables and I really didnt understand Billiards I was going to leave but the owner stopped me. He gestured to play billiards so I figured, why not, so me and the owner played Billiards and he had to show me the rules by pointing and grunting. I would also keep wanting to shoot the wrong ball and he would hit me with his cue when I tried to shoot, and just snicker at me while I laughed because Im not exactly a small guy. It was fun and it drew a pretty big crowd because an American was playing the owner and I actually beat him two games after I got the hang of it.

Singapore is a great place for pool also, Me and a buddy jumped into a cab and told the cab to take us to a pool hall. Well a block later, he dropped us off, boy did we feel dumb. Anyways, the pool hall was cool, 10-12 snooker tables upstairs and 6 9' pool tables downstairs with two more snooker tables. Well my buddy does play pool, but he likes drinking a little bit more so I told him I would buy his beer for the day if we just hang out at the pool hall. He jumped all over my offer and ordered two corona's and a shot. Oh, and by the way, I dont drink. So the owner sees him just chilling out drinking and asks if I want to play and of course I said yes. Well we played for a few hours and I ended up on top, but I figured I lost because there was no way it would cover my bar tab. So I go to pay for everything and the owner doesnt take my money and tell me to come back tomorrow and he will have some friends for me to play. I was thinking that he was going to get the local "top gun" to come down and whoop up on me.

So the next night my buddy and I show up and there are 6 guys waiting for us. Got me a little bit nervouse, but like I said before, I'm not exactly a small guy and neither is my buddy. So we are all standing there looking at one another without saying a word and I finally break the ice and say "so who am I playing first" and they all declined to play and then the owner spoke up. "hey, were not going to play, were going to take you two out on the town". Wow, what a different place singapore is when the locals are showing you around and paying for everything. fun fun fun.

I know it was long, but thanks for reading.

Awesome story. Travel is the tits.

Cuaba
03-12-2010, 02:54 PM
Not so many can tell us about the pool scene in Thailand.

Actually there are a few of us in Thailand (I'll be back next month.) Monto P2, thaitom, SugeKnight, GoBrian77, and myself. Also FourKingsCues is there fairly often. Bangkok is a great town for pool.

Hope to play you again at T.J.'s one of these days. My consulting out there has slowed down in this economy and I haven't been back for over a year.

HomeBrewer
03-12-2010, 04:08 PM
it was Wei showing his appreciation by snapping his fingers sharply and it was my first time ever seeing or hearing it in person.

You know, I never saw that either before living in south Florida for three years, where all my friends there from NJ and NYC did it.

My last couple of years playing snooker in New Zealand and Australia I saw guys tap the wood rail of the table upon approaching it after you played them a good safe. If you made a good 'pot' they would usually just utter the word 'shot' under their breath. Being a native of New Orleans I found myself far and away the loudest person I met in 23 months overseas in any snooker or billiard room.

Scott Lee
03-12-2010, 07:16 PM
JoeyA...You WISH old man! You're right, I do get around. However, I wasn't trying to be sarcastic, just commenting on how unusual it is that you would not know that custom, since it's been around for many decades. Guess you thought it was a poke at your ego...:rolleyes:

Scott Lee
www.poolknowledge.com

since you are much older

JoeyA

sugeknight
03-12-2010, 07:18 PM
I really don't get some of you guys. Suge starts a nice pleasant thread about how pool makes a connection across ethnic lines, and even across nations and some of you have to find a way to piss in his cheerios.

Don't you have anything better to do with your time?
JoeyA

Thank you Joey

sugeknight
03-12-2010, 07:24 PM
sugeknight,

I understand what you are saying about a pool table and how it has a common language. I have traveled around the world at least three times since I have been in the Navy and at every port I seek out a pool table. Some really good times, in Korea where nobody could speak english and I found a billiards hall. I walked into this 16 table hall and the owner looked at me funny as I walked around to see if there was any Pool tables. Since there where no pool tables and I really didnt understand Billiards I was going to leave but the owner stopped me. He gestured to play billiards so I figured, why not, so me and the owner played Billiards and he had to show me the rules by pointing and grunting. I would also keep wanting to shoot the wrong ball and he would hit me with his cue when I tried to shoot, and just snicker at me while I laughed because Im not exactly a small guy. It was fun and it drew a pretty big crowd because an American was playing the owner and I actually beat him two games after I got the hang of it.

Singapore is a great place for pool also, Me and a buddy jumped into a cab and told the cab to take us to a pool hall. Well a block later, he dropped us off, boy did we feel dumb. Anyways, the pool hall was cool, 10-12 snooker tables upstairs and 6 9' pool tables downstairs with two more snooker tables. Well my buddy does play pool, but he likes drinking a little bit more so I told him I would buy his beer for the day if we just hang out at the pool hall. He jumped all over my offer and ordered two corona's and a shot. Oh, and by the way, I dont drink. So the owner sees him just chilling out drinking and asks if I want to play and of course I said yes. Well we played for a few hours and I ended up on top, but I figured I lost because there was no way it would cover my bar tab. So I go to pay for everything and the owner doesnt take my money and tell me to come back tomorrow and he will have some friends for me to play. I was thinking that he was going to get the local "top gun" to come down and whoop up on me.

So the next night my buddy and I show up and there are 6 guys waiting for us. Got me a little bit nervouse, but like I said before, I'm not exactly a small guy and neither is my buddy. So we are all standing there looking at one another without saying a word and I finally break the ice and say "so who am I playing first" and they all declined to play and then the owner spoke up. "hey, were not going to play, were going to take you two out on the town". Wow, what a different place singapore is when the locals are showing you around and paying for everything. fun fun fun.

I know it was long, but thanks for reading.

I like those stories a lot. Thanks for posting!
and you're from Whidbey Island? I hear thats a beautiful place!

sugeknight
03-12-2010, 07:34 PM
Suge,
Hopefully I'll see you again next month. I arrive right after Songkran.

Bangkok is a great town for pool. I agree with your post.

You need to get into one of our late-night ring games at Players. That will improve your game.

Hey Brad, its been a while man. Im going to check out Singapore and KL over Songkhran but when I get back lets shoot some. Im down for a ring game, and a few buckets of beer :grin:

JoeyA
03-12-2010, 09:00 PM
Holy cow JoeyA! Snapping fingers to acknowledge a good shot is as old as the hills. It's hard to believe that as much as you get around, and as long as you've been around pool, you've never heard of that. The players were doing that 50 years ago in Johnston City (among every other place). IMO, it's always been extremely commonplace. Well...at least NOW you know about it.:grin:

Scott Lee
www.poolknowledge.com

JoeyA...You WISH old man! You're right, I do get around. However, I wasn't trying to be sarcastic, just commenting on how unusual it is that you would not know that custom, since it's been around for many decades. Guess you thought it was a poke at your ego...:rolleyes:

Scott Lee
www.poolknowledge.com

I was too young to be hanging out at Johnston City 50 years ago. If you saw people snapping their fingers at Johnston City 50 years ago, you are FAR OLDER than I thought. :p

JoeyA

mullyman
03-12-2010, 09:43 PM
Don't get in a huff, Mr. Knight. I was only implying, through an admittedly brilliant bit of satirical humor, that the 'we are the world' crap is a facade. Just remember that two of those countries you mentioned own almost all of our debt, and one of them would just as soon turn our country in to a parking lot than argue over a barrel of oil, which is probably what's going to happen one of these days.

Sow what are you saying? That we shouldn't associate with people from those countries? It's their government, not them. How jaded are you?
MULLY

mullyman
03-12-2010, 09:46 PM
Holy cow JoeyA! Snapping fingers to acknowledge a good shot is as old as the hills. It's hard to believe that as much as you get around, and as long as you've been around pool, you've never heard of that. The players were doing that 50 years ago in Johnston City (among every other place). IMO, it's always been extremely commonplace. Well...at least NOW you know about it.:grin:

Scott Lee
www.poolknowledge.com

Holy Christ, Scott, are you smoking sterno? I've been playing this game for damn near 25 years and I never saw anyone snapping their fingers until about 10 years ago, if that far back. Now, if you were talking about tapping the cue on the floor, yeah, but I think you're wrong on this one. No real way to prove it though.
MULLY
I hate it when people snap their fingers to recognize a good shot

pooladdiction
03-12-2010, 10:58 PM
Sugeknight I loved your story. I just love pool stories in general. I think I kind of know what you're saying though. Similar to the way a construction worker and a lawyer could be sitting next to eachother at a Cubs game and when a homer is hit they could high five and talk baseball as friends whereas normally their social paths nights never cross. That was a long winded version of what you've already so eloquently wrote "the language we all speak." Nice post

9bizzle
03-12-2010, 11:27 PM
I really don't get some of you guys. Suge starts a nice pleasant thread about how pool makes a connection across ethnic lines, and even across nations and some of you have to find a way to piss in his cheerios.

Don't you have anything better to do with your time?
JoeyA

Word!!! That's why I was so hesitant to sign up on this forum, it seems things can get ugly quick for no apparent reason. Suge, I appreciate your post and get the point of it. I was in Bangkok back in 94' but I was touring with a band and wasn't into pool then, so I never got to check out that part of the worlds love for pool. The traffic there was :eek:

CreeDo
03-12-2010, 11:48 PM
Actually there are a few of us in Thailand (I'll be back next month.) Monto P2, thaitom, SugeKnight, GoBrian77, and myself. Also FourKingsCues is there fairly often. Bangkok is a great town for pool.

Hope to play you again at T.J.'s one of these days. My consulting out there has slowed down in this economy and I haven't been back for over a year.

I did think of you when I wrote that line Cuaba! It was fun last time and it's too bad there's no excuse to come back. The place now has a diamond and a streaming setup. Though if I had my choice, I'd rather visit you in Thailand than you come back here. True story: This town has three thai restaurants. But I go to one near my regular pool hall almost every week, and the best thai in the state is less than 15 minutes from another popular room.

Marie's husband
03-13-2010, 02:32 AM
Sugeknight,

Yes, Whidbey Island is a beautiful place and have been stationed here for going on 20 years, Navy. The only draw back to living here is there are no pool halls so its just bar boxes, tough to improve your game playing on them. Also its tough to keep somewhat of a game when you dont see a pool table 6 months out of the year, but once retirement hits, its time to get in stroke and try and see if I can improve a little bit.

Another story for you though, We pulled into Sasebo(sp) Japan for a few days back in 2007 and me and five friends were walking down a back street. Low and behold, we walked up on a small 6 table pool hall. Well my friends didn' want to play pool because there was drinking to be had so I told them to come back and get me in a couple of hours. So I walk into the pool hall and the only people there was a gentleman that look like he was in his forties working the counter and myself. I asked him if he wanted to play some and he just gave me a blank stare. Yep, he couldn't speak a lick of English so the next thing I know, he hands me his phone after he dialed some phone number. A lady answered in Japanese and as soon as I said Hello she hung up. Well he called back and said something to her and then handed me the phone and she translated for me that all I wanted to do is play some pool with him so he grabbed his sticks and some balls and we went to one of the nice gold crowns. Well I went to grab a house stick and he stopped me and let me play with one of his,,,don't know what type of cue it was but it did have a tiger shaft. Anyways, for the next two hours it seemed like that damn rack was attached to my hand. I remember him putting a 6 and a 7 pack on me like it was nothing. Oh, when I say pack, I'm meaning never getting off of my seat except to rack. It was a humbling experience, but an experience I really enjoyed as I sat there and tried to pick up on anything that could help my game out. I don't think either one of us made a noise the entire time, just tapping the butt of the cue on the hardwood floor in acknowledging of nice outs and nice shots. A real enjoyable time for me and I think he enjoyed it also because when my friends came back to get me I tried to pay and he just wouldn't accept any money, all he would accept is a handshake and a gesture from me saying thank you. Man I wish I had his name just to see if he was one of the top players or if he fit into the the old saying "there's always someone better out there".

I think you run into a lot of pool players that have forgotten the basic etiquette when it come to how you act while playing pool or while in a pool hall. It is always a true joy when you come across another pool player that give the game and there competitor the respect they deserve.

Just my 2 cents...

afss
03-13-2010, 06:26 AM
If we are so despised, why does eveyone in the world want to live here? Go to school here? Work here?
Why do Canadians come down for Medical care? Who was the first in to help out the Haitians.
Shame on you! I just hope John Wayne and Ronald Reagan isn't watching this. :p
First of all great story. I have also played pool with many people from around the globe, its a starting point to start a conversation if a common language is shared, or just share the game if not.

Tramp, this is part of the problem. The states is a great country with lots to offer but just because people come there you assume everyone in the world wants to be there. Everyone doesn't want to live there, work there or go to school there, for that matter want to go there for medical care. They go there because its not available to them where they live and it is available there. I am sure they would much rather it be available in their home country. Its not because they want to be there but they want what is available to better themselves. I worked in the States for a few years, I enjoyed my time there, but i wasn't there because i wanted to be. I was there because at that time its where the work was and the states had a shortage of skilled people in my trade.

Its not what your county has to offer that is despised, its the attitude arrogance and bravado of some, notice i say some, not all. Frequently this is probably just a difference in culture. Most Americans i have met are great folks, but as with any country some are not. In this situation unfortunately Americans tend to be the "loudest" so they tend stand out. There is nothing wrong with this necessarily, but in my current job i can often tell that a person is from the states before they tell me just by their attitude towards how they deal with people, conflict and situations. To me its not wrong its just different. Unfortunately to many cultures it could be and is often considered rude and this is likely where a lot of the despise comes from.

This is not meant as an attack, though i am sure some will take it that way, its just my observations from living there as an outsider.
As i said the states is a great country.
Take it or leave it, its only my opinion.

JoeyA
03-13-2010, 08:45 AM
Sugeknight,

Yes, Whidbey Island is a beautiful place and have been stationed here for going on 20 years, Navy. The only draw back to living here is there are no pool halls so its just bar boxes, tough to improve your game playing on them. Also its tough to keep somewhat of a game when you dont see a pool table 6 months out of the year, but once retirement hits, its time to get in stroke and try and see if I can improve a little bit.

Another story for you though, We pulled into Sasebo(sp) Japan for a few days back in 2007 and me and five friends were walking down a back street. Low and behold, we walked up on a small 6 table pool hall. Well my friends didn' want to play pool because there was drinking to be had so I told them to come back and get me in a couple of hours. So I walk into the pool hall and the only people there was a gentleman that look like he was in his forties working the counter and myself. I asked him if he wanted to play some and he just gave me a blank stare. Yep, he couldn't speak a lick of English so the next thing I know, he hands me his phone after he dialed some phone number. A lady answered in Japanese and as soon as I said Hello she hung up. Well he called back and said something to her and then handed me the phone and she translated for me that all I wanted to do is play some pool with him so he grabbed his sticks and some balls and we went to one of the nice gold crowns. Well I went to grab a house stick and he stopped me and let me play with one of his,,,don't know what type of cue it was but it did have a tiger shaft. Anyways, for the next two hours it seemed like that damn rack was attached to my hand. I remember him putting a 6 and a 7 pack on me like it was nothing. Oh, when I say pack, I'm meaning never getting off of my seat except to rack. It was a humbling experience, but an experience I really enjoyed as I sat there and tried to pick up on anything that could help my game out. I don't think either one of us made a noise the entire time, just tapping the butt of the cue on the hardwood floor in acknowledging of nice outs and nice shots. A real enjoyable time for me and I think he enjoyed it also because when my friends came back to get me I tried to pay and he just wouldn't accept any money, all he would accept is a handshake and a gesture from me saying thank you. Man I wish I had his name just to see if he was one of the top players or if he fit into the the old saying "there's always someone better out there".

I think you run into a lot of pool players that have forgotten the basic etiquette when it come to how you act while playing pool or while in a pool hall. It is always a true joy when you come across another pool player that give the game and there competitor the respect they deserve.

Just my 2 cents...

Tap, tap, tap!
JoeyA

JoeyA
03-13-2010, 08:49 AM
First of all great story. I have also played pool with many people from around the globe, its a starting point to start a conversation if a common language is shared, or just share the game if not.

Tramp, this is part of the problem. The states is a great country with lots to offer but just because people come there you assume everyone in the world wants to be there. Everyone doesn't want to live there, work there or go to school there, for that matter want to go there for medical care. They go there because its not available to them where they live and it is available there. I am sure they would much rather it be available in their home country. Its not because they want to be there but they want what is available to better themselves. I worked in the States for a few years, I enjoyed my time there, but i wasn't there because i wanted to be. I was there because at that time its where the work was and the states had a shortage of skilled people in my trade.

Its not what your county has to offer that is despised, its the attitude arrogance and bravado of some, notice i say some, not all. Frequently this is probably just a difference in culture. Most Americans i have met are great folks, but as with any country some are not. In this situation unfortunately Americans tend to be the "loudest" so they tend stand out. There is nothing wrong with this necessarily, but in my current job i can often tell that a person is from the states before they tell me just by their attitude towards how they deal with people, conflict and situations. To me its not wrong its just different. Unfortunately to many cultures it could be and is often considered rude and this is likely where a lot of the despise comes from.

This is not meant as an attack, though i am sure some will take it that way, its just my observations from living there as an outsider.
As i said the states is a great country.
Take it or leave it, its only my opinion.

I really love your candor and heads-up. Thanks for giving us states people a fair look at ourselves through your eyes.

What country are you from? (Private Message is OK).

Thanks,
JoeyA

accustatsfan
03-13-2010, 11:34 AM
Playing in Thailand is a great experience. I was in Pattaya beach (90's) and you walk in and its filled with 12 foot snooker tables. I play pool so this was a new experience for me. I'm an American, but I learned snooker overseas so I'm more familiar with the way they play snooker than we do.

The only bad part is I'm hooked on snooker with nowhere to play.

Walk in the door and there's a person getting you a table, drink, find you somebody to play and whatever. They have rack girls who replace the colors and rack every game.

The rest of you who make anti-American comments "get out" (crowded here anyway) and practice your "free speech" overseas see how far that gets you.

Countries build fences to keep their people in we need one to keep people out.

afss
03-13-2010, 12:57 PM
I live in Canada in Nova Scotia

poolplayer2093
03-13-2010, 01:09 PM
Born and raised, I've lived the past 26 years of my life in California, until recently.
Last September I got the chance to move to Bangkok, Thailand for a 1 year teaching contract. I happily accepted, but it came at a time when my game was really starting to improve.
I was taking lessons, and I was able to practice at least 5 times a week. I was really worried that I wouldn't be able to practice and play as much as I had been at home in California.
Well, its been about 6 months and truth be told, I haven't been able to play nearly as much as I was at home since my pool hall here is about a 45 minute commute and I have to take 2 different modes of public transportation to get there. But despite the inconveniences of travel and expenses, I still try to make the journey downtown 2-3 times a week.
On to the point of this post.
Since moving to Bangkok, my appreciation of our game has grown to a whole new level. I always knew that pool was played in every country around the world, but there is a difference between thinking that you know something and then experiencing it first hand.
Yesterday I went to play and had sets with gentlemen from Japan and Bangladesh. English wasn't spoken at the table. It wasn't possible. But we were able to communicate perfectly and even share a few laughs.
In just 6 short months I've meet and played with people from India, Austrailia, England, France, China, Dubai, Japan, of course Thailand and even AZ forumland. It's been a real pleasure and has given me a lot of hope for the future of our sport.
Regards,
suge

Hay Suge when're you coming back to the states to visit? let me know when you do man.

you give me the 8 and you got action

Taco
03-13-2010, 07:27 PM
Playing in Thailand is a great experience. I was in Pattaya beach (90's) and you walk in and its filled with 12 foot snooker tables. I play pool so this was a new experience for me. I'm an American, but I learned snooker overseas so I'm more familiar with the way they play snooker than we do.

The only bad part is I'm hooked on snooker with nowhere to play.

Walk in the door and there's a person getting you a table, drink, find you somebody to play and whatever. They have rack girls who replace the colors and rack every game.

The rest of you who make anti-American comments "get out" (crowded here anyway) and practice your "free speech" overseas see how far that gets you.

Countries build fences to keep their people in we need one to keep people out.

I don't think the Founding Fathers meant the words free speech to appear in ironic quotation marks.

And if they'd built a fence we would have a population of zero. We're a nation of immigrants.

Cuaba
03-13-2010, 09:00 PM
Hey Brad, its been a while man. Im going to check out Singapore and KL over Songkhran but when I get back lets shoot some. Im down for a ring game, and a few buckets of beer :grin:

Sounds great to me. You got my number.

gobrian77
03-14-2010, 03:34 AM
Sounds great to me. You got my number.

I'm gonna come up to Bangkok for a few days after Songkran as well (I'll try to make Brad's b-day- I may miss it by a day or two though- depends on some stuff I have scheduled in Samui that I'm trying to get out of).

crawfish
03-14-2010, 07:21 AM
Does everyone ***** about the rack and humidity, or is it just us?

sugeknight
03-14-2010, 09:49 AM
Sugeknight I loved your story. I just love pool stories in general. I think I kind of know what you're saying though. Similar to the way a construction worker and a lawyer could be sitting next to eachother at a Cubs game and when a homer is hit they could high five and talk baseball as friends whereas normally their social paths nights never cross. That was a long winded version of what you've already so eloquently wrote "the language we all speak." Nice post

thanks pooladdiction. you give a very good example as well!

sugeknight
03-14-2010, 09:58 AM
Word!!! That's why I was so hesitant to sign up on this forum, it seems things can get ugly quick for no apparent reason. Suge, I appreciate your post and get the point of it. I was in Bangkok back in 94' but I was touring with a band and wasn't into pool then, so I never got to check out that part of the worlds love for pool. The traffic there was :eek:

true brett. as soon as I read the first response I started to regret posting. I usually stick to the wanted/for sale forum for the same reasons you stated. But this has actually been cool and Im glad it seems a lot of people can relate.

You should make another trip out! the traffic is still insane, but the pool is great.

sugeknight
03-14-2010, 10:11 AM
First of all great story. I have also played pool with many people from around the globe, its a starting point to start a conversation if a common language is shared, or just share the game if not.

Tramp, this is part of the problem. The states is a great country with lots to offer but just because people come there you assume everyone in the world wants to be there. Everyone doesn't want to live there, work there or go to school there, for that matter want to go there for medical care. They go there because its not available to them where they live and it is available there. I am sure they would much rather it be available in their home country. Its not because they want to be there but they want what is available to better themselves. I worked in the States for a few years, I enjoyed my time there, but i wasn't there because i wanted to be. I was there because at that time its where the work was and the states had a shortage of skilled people in my trade.

Its not what your county has to offer that is despised, its the attitude arrogance and bravado of some, notice i say some, not all. Frequently this is probably just a difference in culture. Most Americans i have met are great folks, but as with any country some are not. In this situation unfortunately Americans tend to be the "loudest" so they tend stand out. There is nothing wrong with this necessarily, but in my current job i can often tell that a person is from the states before they tell me just by their attitude towards how they deal with people, conflict and situations. To me its not wrong its just different. Unfortunately to many cultures it could be and is often considered rude and this is likely where a lot of the despise comes from.

This is not meant as an attack, though i am sure some will take it that way, its just my observations from living there as an outsider.
As i said the states is a great country.
Take it or leave it, its only my opinion.

hey man, nice post.
it's true, each country has its share of ethnocentric people.
and I think those people need to travel more!

Monto P2
03-14-2010, 10:13 AM
Hey Suge!!!!!Its been long we have met. Lets get togather again for some games:thumbup:

sugeknight
03-14-2010, 10:17 AM
Hay Suge when're you coming back to the states to visit? let me know when you do man.

you give me the 8 and you got action

maybe this summer for a few weeks. I'd be great to meet up at crown and play. Hows your game? Flip anything recently?

sugeknight
03-14-2010, 10:19 AM
Hey Suge!!!!!Its been long we have met. Lets get togather again for some games:thumbup:

Hey Monto, that sounds good man. I'll PM you my number and we can meet up.

Cuaba
03-14-2010, 03:00 PM
Hey Brad, its been a while man. Im going to check out Singapore and KL over Songkhran but when I get back lets shoot some. Im down for a ring game, and a few buckets of beer :grin:

I can't wait.

renard
03-14-2010, 03:31 PM
I will add my story. I retired from the Navy Reserve in 2003. In 2000 I was in Singapore at the Singaporean Navy Officers Mess. Sitting next to a buffet was a beautiful 12 snooker table with a u shaped set of bleachers around it.

I wolfed down the food and grabbed a wall cue that was in real good shape. Started hitting a few balls around and was challenged by an officer to play doubles. I agreed and found a fellow U.S. sailor to play that admittedly didn't know the rules.

The Officers had a conversation between less than a dozen of them on who would be the champs partner. The first game we lost by four points. I surprised myself with a diagonal corner to corner shot. They surprised me by all of them applauding! As everyone finished their lunch they filed into the stands to watch. Soon they were near full with everyone of them fully appreciating the game.

The champ challenged me but we never got to finish. He declared me the winner as I had a single point lead. Nearly all the Singaporeans came down and congratulated me. Patting me on the back and shaking my hand...good times!

sugeknight
03-15-2010, 02:16 AM
I will add my story. I retired from the Navy Reserve in 2003. In 2000 I was in Singapore at the Singaporean Navy Officers Mess. Sitting next to a buffet was a beautiful 12 snooker table with a u shaped set of bleachers around it.

I wolfed down the food and grabbed a wall cue that was in real good shape. Started hitting a few balls around and was challenged by an officer to play doubles. I agreed and found a fellow U.S. sailor to play that admittedly didn't know the rules.

The Officers had a conversation between less than a dozen of them on who would be the champs partner. The first game we lost by four points. I surprised myself with a diagonal corner to corner shot. They surprised me by all of them applauding! As everyone finished their lunch they filed into the stands to watch. Soon they were near full with everyone of them fully appreciating the game.

The champ challenged me but we never got to finish. He declared me the winner as I had a single point lead. Nearly all the Singaporeans came down and congratulated me. Patting me on the back and shaking my hand...good times!

Thats awesome man. Im going to Singapore in a few weeks for the first time. Hopefully I can check out a pool hall in between all the sight seeing.
thanks for sharing.