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View Full Version : So... I had a lesson with Rafael Martinez


Guerra Cues
06-17-2010, 10:28 AM
Hey folks,
Yesterday, I had the pleasure to work with Rafael Martinez.
Not going into many details, but just wanted to say he noticed some flaws on my stroke that he corrected immediately as well we worked on some drills that will help me with what he found wrong with me.
It is incredible but I had lessons with a couple of Pro-Players and Rafael was the first person that I true feel that found what the hell was wrong with my game.
Now is up to me to practice and I was taught.
Rafael Martinez is not just an incredible player but an awesome person as well. And if you get his trust he will share a lot of cool stories with you.

http://www.fogcityjournal.com/images/photos/michael_moore_pool_tourney_061117/mw2w3012_std.jpg

TATE
06-17-2010, 10:37 AM
Hey folks,
Yesterday, I had the pleasure to work with Rafael Martinez.
Not going into many details, but just wanted to say he noticed some flaws on my stroke that he corrected immediately as well we worked on some drills that will help me with what he found wrong with me.
It is incredible but I had lessons with a couple of Pro-Players and Rafael was the first person that I true feel that found what the hell was wrong with my game.
Now is up to me to practice and I was taught.
Rafael Martinez is not just an incredible player but an awesome person as well. And if you get his trust he will share a lot of cool stories with you.

http://www.fogcityjournal.com/images/photos/michael_moore_pool_tourney_061117/mw2w3012_std.jpg

I saw him playing for the first time at the Mezz Tournament. I like watching him play because he's so positive in his cueing action.

He hit a couple of pure stroke shots that were breathtaking. He has one of the best strokes I've ever seen - no hesitation at all - and accurate too.

Chris

cigardave
06-17-2010, 11:46 AM
Here's a link to a trick shot that Rafael did on my new Diamond 9-footer just a couple of days after I bought it and RKC set it up inside my garage. At the time Raffy was staying with my buddy Jeff in Everett.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sj__WLDGL0g


Select 480p for the hi-resolution version.

12squared
06-17-2010, 11:52 AM
Here's a link to a trick shot that Rafael did on my new Diamond 9-footer just a couple of days after I bought it and RKC set it up inside my garage. At the time Raffy was staying with my buddy Jeff in Everett.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sj__WLDGL0g


Select 480p for the hi-resolution version.

That was awesome, thanks.

Tony_in_MD
06-17-2010, 12:34 PM
Watched him play deep into the us open nineball tourney last year. His wide open game and shotmaking was a thrill to watch.

pooljunkie4ever
06-17-2010, 01:16 PM
Really admire the way Rafael plays the game. If more people played the game like he does, it wouldn't be boring to watch. He is a true Brent Frave gunslinger, win or lose, shoot for the hole.:thumbup:.

Maybe, we will cross paths and I will ask him to give me some lessons. :D

cleary
06-17-2010, 03:15 PM
He reminds me of a Hispanic Robert DeNiro. Straight up, 'dont mess with this guy' style.

TATE
06-17-2010, 03:46 PM
He reminds me of a Hispanic Robert DeNiro. Straight up, 'dont mess with this guy' style.

Cleary,

Off topic - but what I want to really know is - how much can you bench press? My guess is 300. And no, I don't want to bet against you doing pushup's.

Chris

Dead Money
06-17-2010, 09:25 PM
I like watching him play. He makes some amazing shots look easy and he plays very fast!

DogsPlayingPool
06-17-2010, 10:14 PM
I like watching him play. He makes some amazing shots look easy and he plays very fast!

Depends what you mean by fast. Raphael certainly doesn't waste any time but it usually takes about a minute for the cue ball to come to rest on most shots, and another 2 minutes before it stops spinning in place. :smile2:

I like watching him play too. He has an unreal stroke and he's a brawler. It doesn't matter who he's playing, he's not a afraid of anyone. Any match he's in, even against a world beater, is a knife fight.

cleary
06-17-2010, 10:20 PM
Cleary,

Off topic - but what I want to really know is - how much can you bench press? My guess is 300. And no, I don't want to bet against you doing pushup's.

Chris

HAHAHAHAHA To be honest, I haven't bench pressed since high school football practice over 10 years ago. I was around that number back then but I was about 50 lbs lighter and more in shape. Now, I honestly have no idea what I could do.

JB Cases
06-18-2010, 03:20 AM
Yes, but how many of you has he cooked for? :-)

Once upon a time in a land far far away we sponsored Rafael when he lived in Germany. We had him over for a weekend to give two clinics attended by 8 people per session and gave him all the money. (note: this is a really good way to put some cash in your favorite professional's pocket)

Rafael was a great great teacher and he not only handled all the technical questions but he also taught game strategy and the mental game.

One question that stands out is that he was asked how he deals with it when his opponent is running a lot of games. Rafael said that he sits there and just waits for his turn to run a lot of games back at the other guy. He said that he knows he is jsut as capable if he gets the chance so he focuses only on what he needs to do and not what they other guy is doing.

He also taught us a bunch of different "hits" this means different speeds and bridge distances for different needs. Very very good information. The videotapes we did of those sessions are long gone sadly.

If you look on YouTube you can find a tournament that we sponsored in Germany where Rafael demolishes Ralf Souquet and Bustamante. Busty asked me after losing 13:2 what he did wrong and I said "you lost the lag". :-) For two or three events there Rafael was unbeatable, his firepower was unreal.

If you watch the Ralf match, you will see a push to a kick that Ralf gives back and Rafael punishes Ralf by showing him a standard kick-safe that Ralf didn't know. Ralf told me later he learned something there.

I am sure you had a good lesson Tony.

poolplayer2093
06-18-2010, 03:42 AM
how much longer till i get the 8?

SCCues
06-18-2010, 02:04 PM
Here's a link to a trick shot that Rafael did on my new Diamond 9-footer just a couple of days after I bought it and RKC set it up inside my garage. At the time Raffy was staying with my buddy Jeff in Everett.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sj__WLDGL0g


Select 480p for the hi-resolution version.

That shot took one heck of a stroke which Rafael has for sure. I love to watch him play 9 ball especially some of the older matches when he played awesome (not saying that he doesn't play awesome now).

James

Str8PoolPlayer
06-18-2010, 08:46 PM
My Favorite Player, for certain ... and a good friend also.

I see him most everyday at The Jointed Cue in SacTown and
he regularly critiques my game and how to improve it.

He is a veritable Encyclopedia of Shots, Moves, & Strategies
in ALL of the Pool disciplines.

TATE
06-18-2010, 08:56 PM
My Favorite Player, for certain ... and a good friend also.

I see him most everyday at The Jointed Cue in SacTown and
he regularly critiques my game and how to improve it.

He is a veritable Encyclopedia of Shots, Moves, & Strategies
in ALL of the Pool disciplines.

So, the rooms to stop and visit in Sacramento are Hard Times and the Jointed Cue? I'm going to be headed up that way in December if any tournaments are going on.

Chris

cuesblues
06-18-2010, 08:59 PM
Here's a link to a trick shot that Rafael did on my new Diamond 9-footer just a couple of days after I bought it and RKC set it up inside my garage. At the time Raffy was staying with my buddy Jeff in Everett.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sj__WLDGL0g


Select 480p for the hi-resolution version.


Thanks for the video.
I fully expect to see a video of Tony making that shot while on his IPhone in a week or so.

12squared
06-18-2010, 09:33 PM
Thanks for the video.
I fully expect to see a video of Tony making that shot while on his IPhone in a week or so.

:thumbup: Very funny Ted.

Bigtruck
06-18-2010, 09:51 PM
:thumbup: Very funny Ted.

Hello Dave!

Rafael is also one of the best at the curve shot and full masse. Some of the shots he comes with are A-mazing. Always look forward to covering events that he is at.

Ray

sascha
06-18-2010, 10:43 PM
Rafael is a great guy to be around with and a phenomenal player as well. i am glad that he is a friend of mine. you really should check out those videos against Ralf and Francisco that were mentioned before. Rafael was deadly there, i have never seen someone destroy Bustamante that way !

Str8PoolPlayer
06-19-2010, 12:30 AM
So, the rooms to stop and visit in Sacramento are Hard Times and the Jointed Cue? I'm going to be headed up that way in December if any tournaments are going on.

Chris

The Jointed Cue has weekly tournaments (Sept. - June) as follows:

Monday Night - "B" 9-Ball
Tuesday Night - Open 9-Ball


Hard Times Monthly Tournaments ( 1 Pocket & 9-Ball ) will be held on December 5th & 6th, with at least $300.00 Added to each tournament.

There are weekly tournaments at Hard Times:

Tuesday Night - Line 8-Ball
Weds. Night - "B" Tournament 9-Ball
Thursday Night - 10-Ball w/Break Pot
Sundays - Open 9-Ball

Come on up and see us whenever possible.

Regards, Howard

jay helfert
06-19-2010, 05:55 AM
Rafael - Only one of the greatest shot makers of all time. I can't think of anyone who can come with bigger shots in pressure situations. Rafael can flat bring it! I've seen Rafael put some dipsy-do on the cue ball that even the top players just shake their head at. He has been wowing us for years with his amazing abilities.

JoeyA
06-19-2010, 07:29 AM
Rafael - Only one of the greatest shot makers of all time. I can't think of anyone who can come with bigger shots in pressure situations. Rafael can flat bring it! I've seen Rafael put some dipsy-do on the cue ball that even the top players just shake their head at. He has been wowing us for years with his amazing abilities.

All right now. You're the second pool person I have heard using the term, "Dipsy-Do" referring to pool. I assume that Dipsy Do means to move the cue ball in a zig-zag manner, like when you are between Tipsy and Drunk. Since the other person was Keith McCready, I guess it's a California thing.

Do you know what "Float the Gypsy means"?

Please correct my definition of Dipsy Do if it is different than yours.

jay helfert
06-19-2010, 09:49 AM
All right now. You're the second pool person I have heard using the term, "Dipsy-Do" referring to pool. I assume that Dipsy Do means to move the cue ball in a zig-zag manner, like when you are between Tipsy and Drunk. Since the other person was Keith McCready, I guess it's a California thing.

Do you know what "Float the Gypsy means"?

Please correct my definition of Dipsy Do if it is different than yours.

I don't know what "float the gypsy" means, and I'm not sure I care either.

Yes, Keith could put the old 'dipsy-do' on the cue ball too. I mean these two guys could make the cue ball do some unnatural things. Both Rafael and Keith could come with shots that most other players wouldn't even attempt. If you ever saw them do it, you wouldn't have to ask.

Guerra Cues
06-19-2010, 10:50 AM
I haven't had a chance to respond to this thread but thanks for all the cool comments guys.
There is always room for improvement and all Rafael showed me was a couple of things that I was doing wron and I seriuslly need to change those things... Now is just a matter of practice :)

OklaPony
06-19-2010, 02:02 PM
He came to what I think was the first Southwest 9-Ball Tour tourney that John held in the OKC metro area back in about 92 or 93. (Not the first SWNBT ever, just the first in this area) It attracted some pretty smooth players and I honestly can't remember who won but I distinctly remember marvelling at the way Martinez played. At the time he was playing with one of Wes Hunter's cues.

TATE
06-19-2010, 02:15 PM
The Jointed Cue has weekly tournaments (Sept. - June) as follows:

Monday Night - "B" 9-Ball
Tuesday Night - Open 9-Ball


Hard Times Monthly Tournaments ( 1 Pocket & 9-Ball ) will be held on December 5th & 6th, with at least $300.00 Added to each tournament.

There are weekly tournaments at Hard Times:

Tuesday Night - Line 8-Ball
Weds. Night - "B" Tournament 9-Ball
Thursday Night - 10-Ball w/Break Pot
Sundays - Open 9-Ball

Come on up and see us whenever possible.

Regards, Howard

Thanks, Howard

Chris

(workin' on my "float the gypsy, dipsy-do shot" as we speak)

Str8PoolPlayer
06-19-2010, 05:49 PM
Thanks, Howard

Chris

(workin' on my "float the gypsy, dipsy-do shot" as we speak)

Tony & I will be working on those also this coming week
with Rafael (assuming he opts to share such knowledge with
two unworthy "grasshoppers".)

jay helfert
06-19-2010, 08:48 PM
Tony & I will be working on those also this coming week
with Rafael (assuming he opts to share such knowledge with
two unworthy "grasshoppers".)

Please remind Rafael about the One Pocket tourney at Hard Times (LA) July 3-4. $2,000 added, $75 entry fee. I'd love to see him come play since he's in the neighborhood.

Bigtruck
06-19-2010, 09:53 PM
Please remind Rafael about the One Pocket tourney at Hard Times (LA) July 3-4. $2,000 added, $75 entry fee. I'd love to see him come play since he's in the neighborhood.

Scott Frost and I were doing commentary in Tulsa at the T-Town Classic when Rafael was playing. We were in awe at some of the shots he attempted and made!!

Good Stuff!

Rafael ended up runner up to young gun Sylver Ochoa. The finals was one race to 5 and Rafael jumped out of the gate 3-0 on Sylver! Awesome match!

Ray

CJ Wiley
06-20-2010, 12:13 AM
Rafael showed me a special little thing that he does with his wrist that helped me years ago....I always like to hear good things about Rafael, he was one of the MOST underrated players in the world...C J




Hey folks,
Yesterday, I had the pleasure to work with Rafael Martinez.
Not going into many details, but just wanted to say he noticed some flaws on my stroke that he corrected immediately as well we worked on some drills that will help me with what he found wrong with me.
It is incredible but I had lessons with a couple of Pro-Players and Rafael was the first person that I true feel that found what the hell was wrong with my game.
Now is up to me to practice and I was taught.
Rafael Martinez is not just an incredible player but an awesome person as well. And if you get his trust he will share a lot of cool stories with you.

http://www.fogcityjournal.com/images/photos/michael_moore_pool_tourney_061117/mw2w3012_std.jpg

JAM
06-20-2010, 02:20 AM
All right now. You're the second pool person I have heard using the term, "Dipsy-Do" referring to pool. I assume that Dipsy Do means to move the cue ball in a zig-zag manner, like when you are between Tipsy and Drunk. Since the other person was Keith McCready, I guess it's a California thing.

In the early ‘80s, I was traveling down South, and word came to me about an upcoming big-paying 9-ball tournament in Columbia, South Carolina, and so off I went, full of hope and wondering what players would show up.

When I arrived at the poolroom, I surveyed the scene, and all the world-beaters were there. I survived the first four days of a really tough field and had a good chance to finally win one. On the final day, though, I woke up a little late and called the poolroom, letting them know I was on my way. I was hoping for an easy draw, but when the voice on the other end of the phone told me who my opponent was, it was the same old song: Jimmy Mataya, the guy who beat me 11 to nothing the last time we played.

I grabbed my cue and rushed over to the tournament site. It was one of those smoky poolrooms with very dim lighting. The only illumination came from the table lamps. After my eyes adjusted, in the distance I noticed this bright red-and-white blinking light, and I knew it could only be one person: Jimmy Mataya.

He was practicing, hitting balls with authority, feeling confident, making real manly shots, and he was wearing this blinding crimson-and-white flickering hat that looked like something out of a carnival. I barely had enough time to hit a few balls, which didn't boost my confidence much, but I really wanted to win this match.

When they announced our names, I grabbed my stick and moseyed on over to our designated table, and here was Jimmy chirping like a canary with those dazzling lights on his hat blinking red and white, red and white, red and white. I didn't want him to think I was sharked, so I let it go.

We lagged for the first break, and we were off and running racing to 11. Jimmy shot through me like Swiss cheese, and before I knew it, he was on the hill with a score of 10-zip. He broke the balls on the case game, and that hat was getting on my nerves as he was running out. I was benched and not liking it. Jimmy ran out to the 7 ball, got out of line, and missed the 8 ball, but he didn't look too worried because it was darn near impossible to pocket the ball at that angle in the corner pocket and get position on the 9 rock. I said, “Jimmy, I'm going to make a dipsy-do shot, and if I do, the hat is mine.”

This shot was in my bag of tricks. I practiced it consistently back home. It was my dipsy-do, also known as the inside kill shot. You must aim downward on the cue ball with follow-through and slide the cue ball over to the back rail with inside english, just shaving the object ball ever so crisply, so the cue ball will deaden off that back rail.

Learn the “feels” for this shot. If you hit the ball too full, it might be because your hand is too tight on the back end of the stick. Stroke downward using less pressure, with a longer stroke. If you over-cut it, it is because your grip is too loose on the butt end of the cue. You need to over-compensate for hitting the ball too full or over-cutting it. Try to lengthen your hand on the cue stick, making sure you don't pull or jerk it too much. I like to twirl my fingers around the butt to get a better “feel” for that longer stroke. This is an advanced shot, and most pros have difficulty in executing this shot. Practice with shorter distances, and make adjustments until you have mastered the “feels.”

Jimmy hadn't even sat down yet, and I was already addressing the ball. I took a very deep breath and made the dipsy-do successfully. The whole crowd became unglued, but I still had 10 more games to go. I assured myself that I wasn't out of it, and making this difficult inside kill shot gave me momentum. I ran four racks, played a safety, ran three more racks, played a safety, and I was steamrolling. The spectators were now on my side, applauding and cheering after every shot, and before I knew it, the score was 10-10. I made a good out in the eleventh game for the win. I could see that Jimmy didn't want to relinquish my prize, but, after a few chuckles and laughs, he presented this hideous hat to me, autographing it “Pretty Boy,” as he was wont to be called, and placed it on my head.

Competing in tournaments for any pool player is an uphill battle. If you practice difficult shots and conquer them, like the inside kill, with a lot of dedication and patience, you may find yourself in the winner’s circle more times than not, if you have your own bag of tricks.

If you wish to read the entire article from InsidePool Magazine, click here: November 19, 2003, The Dipsy-Do by Keith McCready (http://www.insidepool.com/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=index&catid=3&allstories=1)

Getnbzy
06-20-2010, 02:29 AM
In the early ‘80s, I was traveling down South, and word came to me about an upcoming big-paying 9-ball tournament in Columbia, South Carolina, and so off I went, full of hope and wondering what players would show up.

When I arrived at the poolroom, I surveyed the scene, and all the world-beaters were there. I survived the first four days of a really tough field and had a good chance to finally win one. On the final day, though, I woke up a little late and called the poolroom, letting them know I was on my way. I was hoping for an easy draw, but when the voice on the other end of the phone told me who my opponent was, it was the same old song: Jimmy Mataya, the guy who beat me 11 to nothing the last time we played.

I grabbed my cue and rushed over to the tournament site. It was one of those smoky poolrooms with very dim lighting. The only illumination came from the table lamps. After my eyes adjusted, in the distance I noticed this bright red-and-white blinking light, and I knew it could only be one person: Jimmy Mataya.

He was practicing, hitting balls with authority, feeling confident, making real manly shots, and he was wearing this blinding crimson-and-white flickering hat that looked like something out of a carnival. I barely had enough time to hit a few balls, which didn't boost my confidence much, but I really wanted to win this match.

When they announced our names, I grabbed my stick and moseyed on over to our designated table, and here was Jimmy chirping like a canary with those dazzling lights on his hat blinking red and white, red and white, red and white. I didn't want him to think I was sharked, so I let it go.

We lagged for the first break, and we were off and running racing to 11. Jimmy shot through me like Swiss cheese, and before I knew it, he was on the hill with a score of 10-zip. He broke the balls on the case game, and that hat was getting on my nerves as he was running out. I was benched and not liking it. Jimmy ran out to the 7 ball, got out of line, and missed the 8 ball, but he didn't look too worried because it was darn near impossible to pocket the ball at that angle in the corner pocket and get position on the 9 rock. I said, “Jimmy, I'm going to make a dipsy-do shot, and if I do, the hat is mine.”

This shot was in my bag of tricks. I practiced it consistently back home. It was my dipsy-do, also known as the inside kill shot. You must aim downward on the cue ball with follow-through and slide the cue ball over to the back rail with inside english, just shaving the object ball ever so crisply, so the cue ball will deaden off that back rail.

Learn the “feels” for this shot. If you hit the ball too full, it might be because your hand is too tight on the back end of the stick. Stroke downward using less pressure, with a longer stroke. If you over-cut it, it is because your grip is too loose on the butt end of the cue. You need to over-compensate for hitting the ball too full or over-cutting it. Try to lengthen your hand on the cue stick, making sure you don't pull or jerk it too much. I like to twirl my fingers around the butt to get a better “feel” for that longer stroke. This is an advanced shot, and most pros have difficulty in executing this shot. Practice with shorter distances, and make adjustments until you have mastered the “feels.”

Jimmy hadn't even sat down yet, and I was already addressing the ball. I took a very deep breath and made the dipsy-do successfully. The whole crowd became unglued, but I still had 10 more games to go. I assured myself that I wasn't out of it, and making this difficult inside kill shot gave me momentum. I ran four racks, played a safety, ran three more racks, played a safety, and I was steamrolling. The spectators were now on my side, applauding and cheering after every shot, and before I knew it, the score was 10-10. I made a good out in the eleventh game for the win. I could see that Jimmy didn't want to relinquish my prize, but, after a few chuckles and laughs, he presented this hideous hat to me, autographing it “Pretty Boy,” as he was wont to be called, and placed it on my head.

Competing in tournaments for any pool player is an uphill battle. If you practice difficult shots and conquer them, like the inside kill, with a lot of dedication and patience, you may find yourself in the winner’s circle more times than not, if you have your own bag of tricks.

If you wish to read the entire article from InsidePool Magazine, click here: November 19, 2003, The Dipsy-Do by Keith McCready (http://www.insidepool.com/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=index&catid=3&allstories=1)

Great post . Nice to see you in here jennie. Don't be a stranger.