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TATE
06-30-2010, 02:53 PM
Finally...


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nit

Chris

zy112
06-30-2010, 03:21 PM
If you watch The Office, I love Michael Scott's thoughts on Wiki... something like, "I love Wikipedia, anyone in the world can write about anything, so you know its true.:thumbup:

easy-e
06-30-2010, 03:49 PM
"So you know you're getting the best information possible." I love Michael Scott!

FreeShot
06-30-2010, 03:51 PM
I think you could expand it a bit. I've heard the term used to refer to tight bettors in general and not just in pool.

But now if anyone ever calls me a nit, I can reply with, "I'm a unit of luminance equivalent to one candela per square metre?" :)

Tramp Steamer
06-30-2010, 04:27 PM
Well, now I'm really confused. Am I a louse egg, or an Egyptian Goddess?
On the one hand I've always wanted to see the Great Pyramids, and on the other I could hang out with Heather Locklear, if you know what I mean. :)

greyghost
06-30-2010, 04:52 PM
lol thats funny

Drawman623
07-01-2010, 03:39 AM
I thought the T-shirt defined it best:
A nit is someone who will not let you win their money.

12310bch
07-01-2010, 04:32 AM
This is the TRUE and ONlY, FACTUAL, And AUTHENTIC definition of the
word ," NIT." :

Actually my sources say that ," Nit," is derived from the German word ," Niht." meaning ' empty,' or nothing. Thus arose the word ," Nitwit," meaning
, of course, empty headed.

From my post of 6/24/10.l

Ken_4fun
07-01-2010, 04:58 AM
For some reason I thought for sure it was going to have a clown with his thumb up....CocoboloCowboy

Ken

The Schwartz
07-01-2010, 07:04 AM
This is the TRUE and ONlY, FACTUAL, And AUTHENTIC definition of the
word ," NIT." :

Actually my sources say that ," Nit," is derived from the German word ," Niht." meaning ' empty,' or nothing. Thus arose the word ," Nitwit," meaning
, of course, empty headed.

From my post of 6/24/10.l

The German word for nothing is actually Nicht (nihkt). And the word for head is der Kopf, so I'm not sure about this origin, but I don't think it's from the German for empty-headed.

I just knew taking four years of German would do me some good! Ahh, sweet payoff...

12310bch
07-02-2010, 02:02 AM
The German word for nothing is actually Nicht (nihkt). And the word for head is der Kopf, so I'm not sure about this origin, but I don't think it's from the German for empty-headed.

I just knew taking four years of German would do me some good! Ahh, sweet payoff...

you are absolutely right . I am the nitwit. I got confused between the Old English word NIHT for the Old High German word NAHT. Neither of which has anything to do with the topic.

But the word for louse egg , nit, has been morphed in english to mean
something of no worth. As the word ," Nitpick," demonstrates. To NITPICK is to argue over nothing or something that is of no importance. So it can be implied that a NIT is something not worth your time.

Kinda like this thread that I spent an hour and a half
researching. :rotflmao1:

The Schwartz
07-02-2010, 05:29 AM
But the word for louse egg , nit, has been morphed in english to mean
something of no worth. As the word ," Nitpick," demonstrates. To NITPICK is to argue over nothing or something that is of no importance. So it can be implied that a NIT is something not worth your time.

Makes good sense to me. :thumbup:

Measle Ball
07-03-2010, 03:20 PM
...it is NOT an inadvertent typo when saying "'Nite ______" to folk(s) in a pool chat room. But said typo can be most embarrassing... don't ask me how I know...