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CarlB
07-02-2010, 08:36 AM
Anyone have any tips, other than a brush, for cleaning blue chalk off of maroon/red felt?

Mike in MN
07-02-2010, 08:39 AM
Vacuum with an upholstery attachment, and wipe gently with a slightly damp cloth. Should take everything right up.

Cdryden
07-02-2010, 08:51 AM
I do the same as stated above and after cleaning it with a damp cloth I iron the felt on a low setting. It makes the table play allot faster. (Iron in one direction only going with the grain.)

CarlB
07-02-2010, 08:58 AM
Thanks. Ill give it a shot...although I am not sure how long its been on the table or how "worn in" it is.

evanandpeaches
07-02-2010, 09:11 AM
I use denatured alcohol to clean all the tables. Vacuum then lightly spray small squares 2x2 diamonds then wipe with clean towel. The alcohol dries much faster than water and doesnt harm the simonis cloth.
Evan

pt109
07-02-2010, 09:50 AM
I use denatured alcohol to clean all the tables. Vacuum then lightly spray small squares 2x2 diamonds then wipe with clean towel. The alcohol dries much faster than water and doesnt harm the simonis cloth.
Evan

Ah,never thought of that.I hate putting anything but a vacuum on
cloth.But i'm going to try this....thanx

sfleinen
07-02-2010, 10:35 AM
I do the same as stated above and after cleaning it with a damp cloth I iron the felt on a low setting. It makes the table play allot faster. (Iron in one direction only going with the grain.)

Be careful when doing this with the iron! A couple reasons why:

1. Remember what a clothes iron's purpose is -- to flatten out wrinkles in clothes. A clothes iron does this by "relaxing" the cloth with heat (and steam, if dialed). Remember that the cloth on a table is installed with a slight stretch to keep it taught. Ironing the cloth will cause the cloth to "relax" and may introduce loose spots, that ultimately will come away from the slate and causing "bubbling."

2. The poster above mentions "with the grain." This is only really important with nap cloth, which has a "nap" or grain. Worsted cloth like Simonis doesn't really have a grain, per se, but is usually installed in one direction to line up the Simonis logo at various places on the table. When brushing nap cloth specifically, you'll want to brush from the head end of the table, towards the foot end of the table, because the nap goes in that direction. (This is true in both snooker [which is always covered with nap cloth], and pool tables covered specifically with nap cloth.) The direction of brushing on worsted cloth (e.g. Simonis) doesn't really matter, because there is no nap to be concerned about. (That's why, by the way, you'll sometimes see some people recommending to vacuum the cloth in circular motions -- what they don't mention, is that they're doing this on worsted cloth [many folks are too young to remember when tables were covered primarily with nap cloth, or they just out-and-out prefer worsted cloth explicitly].)

3. If you're going to iron the cloth, be very, VERY careful to use very low heat (below the Permanent Press setting, even) and to move the iron backwards -- i.e. the pointed tip of the iron is facing the head rail, and use single strokes from the head end of the table, towards the foot end of the table. REASON: if you have the pointed tip of the iron facing towards the foot end of the table, and iron from the head end towards the foot end, the triangular shape of the iron will "part" the nap sideways (instead of "bowling it over straight down" as the rear flat side of the iron would do), and you'll have what looks like a "Christmas tree pattern raceways" in the nap of your cloth, and slow-rolling balls will do some strange things as they travel through these triangular patterns in the nap.

I hope this is helpful!
-Sean

P.S.: I'm a veteran myself -- ex-U.S. Navy, DS2 (E-5) 1983-1990 aboard the Spruance-class destroyer U.S.S. Briscoe (DD-977) based out of Norfolk, VA.

pocketpared
07-02-2010, 11:16 AM
Buy a chalk eraser at a Staples and wipe the felt down before vacuuming. At first you'll get some debris off the eraser then that will diminish. Don't use a rotating head vacuum brush. I bought a brush head about 10" wide for under 10 bucks. I do the cushion tops and the facings of the pockets with the eraser too. That's all I do.

If you use an iron and your slate seams are filled with wax you'll have a problem.

jay helfert
07-02-2010, 04:23 PM
Buy a chalk eraser at a Staples and wipe the felt down before vacuuming. At first you'll get some debris off the eraser then that will diminish. Don't use a rotating head vacuum brush. I bought a brush head about 10" wide for under 10 bucks. I do the cushion tops and the facings of the pockets with the eraser too. That's all I do.

If you use an iron and your slate seams are filled with wax you'll have a problem.


Yeah, just go to your neighborhood Staples in Kabul. :rolleyes:
A damp cloth is as good as anything else for cleaning your table top and rails. Dries in minutes and you have a clean table.

TATE
07-02-2010, 05:18 PM
Anyone have any tips, other than a brush, for cleaning blue chalk off of maroon/red felt?

For regular cleaning, I now use a large adhesive roller to clean my table. This one is sold by Petsmaert - Evercare - and it was designed for cat hair. It really picks up everything.

http://www.petsmart.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2752860

pocketpared
07-02-2010, 08:36 PM
Yeah, just go to your neighborhood Staples in Kabul. :rolleyes:
A damp cloth is as good as anything else for cleaning your table top and rails. Dries in minutes and you have a clean table.

They have schools in Afghanistan and get mail, don't they, clown?
And what I posted is what RKC told me to do to clean chalk off a table. It's 2010, do you realize?

Mike in MN
07-02-2010, 09:09 PM
They have schools in Afghanistan and get mail, don't they, clown?
And what I posted is what RKC told me to do to clean chalk off a table. It's 2010, do you realize?

Necessary? I vote no.

pocketpared
07-02-2010, 09:11 PM
Do you understand the post? If you do, explain what's happening.

Williebetmore
07-03-2010, 10:03 AM
What Jay said.

A damp cloth (well wrung out, preferably lint free or microfiber) is all you will need in Afghanistan. No need to make it more complicated.

pocketpared
07-03-2010, 11:13 AM
Wiping a table with an chalkboard eraser before vacuuming it to remove chalk is beyond you? LOL. A damp cloth won't get the colored chalk out and that's what the OP is interested in, isn't he? helfert not knowing what he's talking about never kept him from babbling on before, did it?

Mowem down
07-03-2010, 12:24 PM
Wiping a table with an chalkboard eraser before vacuuming it to remove chalk is beyond you? LOL. A damp cloth won't get the colored chalk out and that's what the OP is interested in, isn't he? helfert not knowing what he's talking about never kept him from babbling on before, did it?

I hold true to the first post i ever made "you want to know whats wrong with pool just come on here"...how the hell could a table (sh*t any thread, we are all here to better the game, RIGHT, or not) cleaning thread become a personal attack (trust I do know im just as guilty) holy crap i was rolling... Any way whats the chalkboard eraser for(do)...?

thehammer37
07-03-2010, 12:35 PM
http://www.simoniscloth.com/Simonis_cloth_care.htm



Cloth Care & Maintenance:

Did you know that proper installation of your cloth can prevent premature wear?

If cloth is installed too loosely, the cloth can "bunch up" in front of the ball, thus greatly increasing the appearance of ball burns or white marks on the cloth. Simonis is meant to be installed tightly over the surface of the slate. This not only provides the best playing conditions, but it will ultimately increase the usable life of your cloth. In addition, the fact that Simonis cloth does not stretch like lesser cloths, it stays tight on the table once properly installed.

Typically, white marks left on the surface of the cloth are referred to as ball burns. Simonis' high wool content helps to reduce the appearance of these marks. In addition, we recommend using phenolic balls to further reduce the appearance of these marks. Ball burns from polyester balls are actually marks left on the cloth from degradation of the surface of the ball itself. Phenolic balls are much harder and are much more resistant to heat than polyester balls.

As always, the cloth and the balls should be kept clean. Any residue that has built up on the ball or on the cloth will eventually leave marks. Simple maintenance will prolong the life of your cloth, the aesthetic appearance of your table, and your enjoyment of the game.

Typically, balls are cleaned with special polishes. It is not usually recommended to use water to clean billiard balls. Oils from your hands as well as other compounds can build up on the balls and should be removed regularly.

The cloth can be brushed, but to remove the chalk and talc powders, it can be cleaned with the new Simonis X-1 or it can be carefully vacuumed with a non-rotating brush-head attachment that does not allow for too much suction to be formed. Some small vacuums can pick up bowling balls, but this will only stretch the cloth on the table and possibly harm the grouting of the slates as well. You should test your vacuum and brush attachment off of the table first to make certain that it is not going to damage the play surface. Less is more in this department. After all, you are trying to remove a fine powder from a smooth cloth, so don't overdo it. The Simonis X-1, is a new device that will allow you to keep your cloth in great playing condition and extent the cloth's life.

The cloth can also be wiped with a damp (not wet) clean towel. This should only be done after the table has been vacuumed otherwise the dampness may cause the chalk dust to clump together (think of it as adding water to dry clay). Once the dampness has evaporated, a quick brushing is all you will need before playing as moisture will cause the fibers in the cloth to stand up and a quick brushing will smooth things out.

Stains on the cloth? Contact your local Dry Cleaners as they have some pretty interesting and effective techniques to resolve these incidents. Remember, Simonis is a worsted wool, so be sure to mention that fact.

petticasey
07-03-2010, 01:44 PM
What is the best temperature for ironing felt? I have a ski wax iron that sounds perfect for this. The temperature control on a good tuning iron is extremely precise and they are flat with a slight upward curve on all 4 sides(to avoid pushing wax around). However my iron's lowest temp setting is 100 C. Is this too high? Also how easy is it too tell what kind of felt you have (ie. nap or otherwise).

Thanks

sfleinen
07-03-2010, 01:53 PM
What is the best temperature for ironing felt? I have a ski wax iron that sounds perfect for this. The temperature control on good tuning irons is extremely precise and they are flat with a slight upward curve on all 4 sides(to avoid pushing wax around). However my iron's lowest temp setting is 100 C. Is this too high? Also how easy is it too tell what kind of felt you have (ie. nap or otherwise).

Thanks

petticasey:

You're kidding, right? 100 Celsius is 212 Fahrenheit, or the boiling point of water. Much too hot for this. This will melt the bees wax between the slates.

The best way to determine if you have nap or worsted cloth, is to get a magnifying glass and look closely at it. If you have nap cloth, you'll see the up-standing "nap" or bits of fibers. Worsted cloth, on the other hand, will look like very tight weaving of rods, like concrete rebars, throughout with no up-standing fibers whatsoever.

Hope that's helpful!
-Sean

pocketpared
07-03-2010, 06:03 PM
I hold true to the first post i ever made "you want to know whats wrong with pool just come on here"...how the hell could a table (sh*t any thread, we are all here to better the game, RIGHT, or not) cleaning thread become a personal attack (trust I do know im just as guilty) holy crap i was rolling... Any way whats the chalkboard eraser for(do)...?

It generates an electrostatic charge and draws the chalk dust out of the cloth. Their instructions on the website were for the average neophyte. Look at the device Simonis created and now sells for chalk dust.
ps...I don't start them..I just finish them.

terminal_288
07-04-2010, 02:11 AM
From my days of working in a poolhall, I would recomend a bucket of warm water and a damp cloth(something lint free, I always used just a standard kitchen j-cloth). I would go over it befor hand with the brush just to get any grit off, if there are any blue spots that are standing out a dabbing action before going over the table from one end to the other. Make sure the cloth you use is wrung out almost dry and rince it out one or 2 times and just let the table sit a bit before you start hitting balls.
peace vince

Big Dave
07-04-2010, 02:30 AM
http://www.pro9.co.uk/html/theproshop/images/products/X1Simonis457004.jpg

Has anyone tried these?