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DWoods6354
09-22-2010, 02:43 PM
In another recent thread - I submitted my version of the history of chalk. I was then challenged by another AZ member to expand my feigned knowledge to the history of Aiming Systems. The intent of this instructional essay is to provide a basic outline on the recent history of aiming systems, as related to my practical application, in response to the challenge.

Hit It Here
In the beginning, as taught by old Uncle Fred (and similarly enlightened Geezers usually playing golf in musty and darkened rooms), was the “Hit It Here” system.

The ritual was simple. The advanced instructor would point his stick at the Object Ball (OB), roughly in the general direction of the pocket. The tip of his cue, quivering from palsy induced shakes, and not close to the OB for fear of actually touching it, would indicate the exact point of aim. The simple perfection of the system was evident. If the ball did not go – you did not “Hit It Here”.

Ghost Ball
The younger and more advanced instructors of the day offered an improved method. Although they would not actually gamble with the Geezers or Uncle Fred for that matter, their system excelled by placing a cue ball from an adjoining table in “exactly” the exit point of the tangent line to the intended pocket. This method provided a revelation to the novice. The cue ball was round, so aiming the middle of the cue at the “Hit It Here” point only worked well on straight in shots. You had to aim at a ball that you could not see – hence the term “ghost ball”.

Fractional Aiming
Then fractional aiming systems climbed from the primordial ooze. A small group of Physics majors (who were required to play at B level or above to be admitted to the secret society) decided to quantify the physics of aiming using fractional methods. Boolean notation (being relatively unknown to the average pool player) was dismissed as an appropriate instructional tool and since everyone knew how much a half or a third of a pie was (and pies being relatively round) – fractions were introduced.

Geometric Aiming
Fractions were fine for a time however Geometry with a full three-hundred-sixty degrees worth of choices (not counting exponential possibilities of minutes) offered a new mantra to the learned novice. The drawback to this method became evident when protractors were laughed at when revealed in the bona-fide pool room. Novice players employing their use were often teased or invited to play for large sums of money by less refined individuals who had skipped Geometry entirely.

Edge Aiming
This system relied upon a new concept entirely. The novice had to “unlearn” the Hit it Here and Ghost Ball systems – and learn to aim at the edge of the OB using varying degrees of left or right tip offset on the CB. Then the novice must employ a pirouette or pivot toward the center of the ball – and Walla – you were aligned perfectly. Excellemont, Perfectemente!!! A major stumbling block to learning this system was there was little one could do when you actually need right or left English. The pivot did not seem to help achieve a proper aim using English unless our novice student reverted back to formulating speed, spin, and squirt using either Geometric or Fractional logic.


Stick Alignment and Zen
A small group of enlightened players (most likely out of Sedona) soon quantified the proper aiming method by likening a billiard shot to the ancient art of archery. Aim with the stick as you would an arrow – free your mind – use the force – and universal aspheric harmony can be achieved. Angles and Geometry exist only to define the universal strength of your mind. Allow yourself to aim, will yourself to aim well, and so it will be.

My Conclusions
While attempting to perform a survey on the actual use of these systems, I soon learned that the question “which aiming system do you use” draws hustlers the way a can opener entices the hound. The non-predatory players approached with the question would look at me with crossed eyes, and a resounding…. What???

These days on the rare occasion when a young player actually catches me making a fine shot (usually playing golf on the back table with the other Geezers) and wants to know my aiming method - - - I kindly set up the shot again – point my shaking cue at the OB in the general direction of the pocket – and simply say “Hit it Here”.

LAMas
09-22-2010, 03:06 PM
Thanks,
Not as entertaining as your disclosure of the secrets in the chalk, chalk,chalk thread reply. :)

Be prepared to be asked for more details on one or more the methods you mentioned.

Could be fun.:thumbup:

JStarkweather
09-22-2010, 03:13 PM
Cheers!

Sent from my HERO200 using Tapatalk

randyg
09-22-2010, 03:47 PM
In another recent thread - I submitted my version of the history of chalk. I was then challenged by another AZ member to expand my feigned knowledge to the history of Aiming Systems. The intent of this instructional essay is to provide a basic outline on the recent history of aiming systems, as related to my practical application, in response to the challenge.

Hit It Here
In the beginning, as taught by old Uncle Fred (and similarly enlightened Geezers usually playing golf in musty and darkened rooms), was the “Hit It Here” system.

The ritual was simple. The advanced instructor would point his stick at the Object Ball (OB), roughly in the general direction of the pocket. The tip of his cue, quivering from palsy induced shakes, and not close to the OB for fear of actually touching it, would indicate the exact point of aim. The simple perfection of the system was evident. If the ball did not go – you did not “Hit It Here”.

Ghost Ball
The younger and more advanced instructors of the day offered an improved method. Although they would not actually gamble with the Geezers or Uncle Fred for that matter, their system excelled by placing a cue ball from an adjoining table in “exactly” the exit point of the tangent line to the intended pocket. This method provided a revelation to the novice. The cue ball was round, so aiming the middle of the cue at the “Hit It Here” point only worked well on straight in shots. You had to aim at a ball that you could not see – hence the term “ghost ball”.

Fractional Aiming
Then fractional aiming systems climbed from the primordial ooze. A small group of Physics majors (who were required to play at B level or above to be admitted to the secret society) decided to quantify the physics of aiming using fractional methods. Boolean notation (being relatively unknown to the average pool player) was dismissed as an appropriate instructional tool and since everyone knew how much a half or a third of a pie was (and pies being relatively round) – fractions were introduced.

Geometric Aiming
Fractions were fine for a time however Geometry with a full three-hundred-sixty degrees worth of choices (not counting exponential possibilities of minutes) offered a new mantra to the learned novice. The drawback to this method became evident when protractors were laughed at when revealed in the bona-fide pool room. Novice players employing their use were often teased or invited to play for large sums of money by less refined individuals who had skipped Geometry entirely.

Edge Aiming
This system relied upon a new concept entirely. The novice had to “unlearn” the Hit it Here and Ghost Ball systems – and learn to aim at the edge of the OB using varying degrees of left or right tip offset on the CB. Then the novice must employ a pirouette or pivot toward the center of the ball – and Walla – you were aligned perfectly. Excellemont, Perfectemente!!! A major stumbling block to learning this system was there was little one could do when you actually need right or left English. The pivot did not seem to help achieve a proper aim using English unless our novice student reverted back to formulating speed, spin, and squirt using either Geometric or Fractional logic.


Stick Alignment and Zen
A small group of enlightened players (most likely out of Sedona) soon quantified the proper aiming method by likening a billiard shot to the ancient art of archery. Aim with the stick as you would an arrow – free your mind – use the force – and universal aspheric harmony can be achieved. Angles and Geometry exist only to define the universal strength of your mind. Allow yourself to aim, will yourself to aim well, and so it will be.

My Conclusions
While attempting to perform a survey on the actual use of these systems, I soon learned that the question “which aiming system do you use” draws hustlers the way a can opener entices the hound. The non-predatory players approached with the question would look at me with crossed eyes, and a resounding…. What???

These days on the rare occasion when a young player actually catches me making a fine shot (usually playing golf on the back table with the other Geezers) and wants to know my aiming method - - - I kindly set up the shot again – point my shaking cue at the OB in the general direction of the pocket – and simply say “Hit it Here”.



I'm guessing that you are "tongue in cheek". Your descriptions of each are at best a little shaky. You also missed a few of my favorite aiming systems....SPF=randyg

CocoboloCowboy
09-22-2010, 04:30 PM
You missed the BEST Aiming System I have EVER SEEN, CTE!

greyghost
09-22-2010, 04:45 PM
You also missed Patrick Johnsons latest headache......shadow aiming lmfao

BuddyWing
09-22-2010, 05:39 PM
I loved it !!!
Thanks for the laughs .....

pjwoolw
09-22-2010, 06:54 PM
Definitely got a good chuckle out of this one. :thumbup2:

LAMas
09-22-2010, 07:32 PM
You missed the BEST Aiming System I have EVER SEEN, CTE!


CTE is described by the author below:

"Edge Aiming
This system relied upon a new concept entirely. The novice had to “unlearn” the Hit it Here and Ghost Ball systems – and learn to aim at the edge of the OB using varying degrees of left or right tip offset on the CB. Then the novice must employ a pirouette or pivot toward the center of the ball – and Walla – you were aligned perfectly. Excellemont, Perfectemente!!! A major stumbling block to learning this system was there was little one could do when you actually need right or left English. The pivot did not seem to help achieve a proper aim using English unless our novice student reverted back to formulating speed, spin, and squirt using either Geometric or Fractional logic."

English and the other adjustments are added after the pivot to the center of the CB as you said. BHE or FHE may be imployed.

:)

DWoods6354
09-22-2010, 11:31 PM
I'm guessing that you are "tongue in cheek". Your descriptions of each are at best a little shaky. You also missed a few of my favorite aiming systems....SPF=randyg

Hello Randy,

Yes - the story was satirie - and should not be taken seriously by anyone....

Regards,

Dan

randyg
09-23-2010, 06:02 AM
Hello Randy,

Yes - the story was satirie - and should not be taken seriously by anyone....

Regards,

Dan

Hi Dan, miss you....SPF=randyg