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jay helfert
10-25-2010, 03:04 PM
Yes, I'm calling you out - to play pool for money! After a few down years in professional pool in America, things are starting to pick up again. New (and old) promoters, new events and more added money. This is all good for the pros who are trying to earn a living playing the game. Yes, it is true that most of the world's top players travel the globe pursuing fame and fortune at pool.

But we are finally beginning to see an upsurge in professional events here in the USA. so the best thing the players can do is support these events by playing in them. First of all I'm talking about the upcoming Steve Mizerak Championship put on by the Seminole Tribe in Hollywood, Florida on Nov. 4-7. This is a $50,000 Added tournament, which translates to big money for the high finishers. I'm guessing twenty five to thirty thousand on top! Not a bad payday for someone.

Barry Behrman (the U.S. Open promoter) is bringing back his Masters event on March 1-5, 2011. This will boast a $100,000 purse with 128 players. Additionally we already have the U.S. Open ($180,000), Derby City (nearly $200,000 total), the World Pool Masters (100K) and the U.S. Open Ten Ball (85K) both in May. That's six major pool tournaments on our shores, not to mention all the great regional tours with some serious added money, like the two Turning Stone events (25K added) and the Seminole Pro Tour (all stops soon to be at least 10K added).

To make these events work and continue to be held, it behooves the players to support them. I'd like to once again see the day when we have a major tournament in America every month for the pros to play in. Maybe Reno and the Peppermill will bring back that event, and maybe a few other events will be created.

There is renewed interest in professional pool in America and that's a good thing. But it is up to the players to support these good promoters and participate in their events. As much as some people would like to make me out to be a hater of last year's Galveston event, that is simply not the case. Over $100,000 in total added money was pumped into the various prize funds. Yes, it was short of the promised pay outs, but the players did get paid - in full! Several pros earned a healthy five figures that week, so it wasn't all bad. Who knows, maybe even that event can be resurrected.

JAM
10-25-2010, 03:13 PM
Good post! :)

center pocket
10-25-2010, 03:26 PM
I like the post, an optimistic outlook is always a good thing!

Road Warrior
10-25-2010, 03:39 PM
All those tournament sound great! But not just the players need to support them the fans need to show up at the events and suport them, next year I'll be planning some of my vacations to attend some of them and do my little bit to help ( and have a ton of fun in the process!) :)

poohatur
10-25-2010, 03:56 PM
I agree that money can really bring out the best out of pool players. This is a key ingredient motivating people to practice or just get out there and go for it. One day I would also like to host a pool tournament, getting sponsors from all over who share the same beliefs and love the game just as much.

justadub
10-25-2010, 04:00 PM
All those tournament sound great! But not just the players need to support them the fans need to show up at the events and suport them, next year I'll be planning some of my vacations to attend some of them and do my little bit to help ( and have a ton of fun in the process!) :)

I was thinking about trying to steal a few days away on one of my vacations next year as well. Here's hoping...

inside_english
10-25-2010, 04:04 PM
Great post Jay.
If I may, I would like to suggest to the promoters/coordinators of these big events to have more of them available via the Internet.

I know they want to fill the seats because attendance is always good for business, but there are more and more of us who cannot attend because of work/personal/financial reasons, and being able to enjoy some of these matches (for a nominal fee) would be great.

There will be those who complain that they should not have to pay to see matches online, but the game does not need them. This is about putting money back into the game we love so we can keep it going.

Tom In Cincy
10-25-2010, 04:26 PM
Yes sir, all that you say is true and it seems that there is an increase in the chances to make some money on these tournaments mentioned.

The promoters are finding more sponsors and are more finacially effective. Venues are getting better at negociating with the promoters to offer a better price.

Better costs for the players to enter the tournament the easier it is for them to make the decision to play.

Same goes for the fans wanting to see the pros play up close.

Just a reminder about those players that have never been to a professional tournament, when you watch the pros play you pick up some of the skill needed to perform better when you return to the table.

There is nothing like see how pool is played at its highest level of competition. Those players can play and when they make a shot that makes your jaw drop and leaves you speechless, you'll know what I mean. You have to see it in person to understand what I am saying.

The players are very approachable. Most of them enjoy the friendly chats that the fans can bring. Autographs are very common, just don't expect them to sign more than 1 or 2 items at once.

Always thank the Promoter and Tournament Director. Those two usually have to work the hardest and usually have the longest days during the tournament.

It can be a carnival atmosphere with rows and rows of vendors wanting to offer you their wares. Good buys are also available. Once again, there are plenty of vendors that like to chat to the fans. The more info the vendors can share with the fans, the more informed the market is. Those Cue makers are great for this.

Every tournament I've been to has always been extremely exciting. I've introduced some of my pool playing friends to these tournaments and they are fans and return every year that they can.

Tournaments I've not been to;
Super Billiards Expo. Mr. Hopkins already has all the money he will get from me. It was an incident in Memphis in the late 60s.

Turning Stone. I've heard nothing but great stories about Mike Zuglan's event and tour.

Gerry
10-25-2010, 04:39 PM
Way to keep us hungry Jay!! There was a time not too long ago that you had to pick what kick ass event you were going to go to any given weekend. Some of it was left over from the color of money days, but as a banger local I could pick tourneys in Delaware, Jersey, Pa, NY, MD and maybe cash......BUT we always could find action at any price level, and always come home with some great stories!.....not to mention all the rooms had weeknite $10 tourneys to make a few bucks and hone our skills.

What I miss most is sweating daily action for whatever money, but they always played HARD for the money AND for the pecking order at the pool room.

I practice mostly at home, and each time I play I stuff a little cash in the case to save up for the DCC. I have a good chunk ready, and no plans yet....which I like....I'll just get my buddy Jim to drive and we will set out west and see what happens.....

G.

measureman
10-25-2010, 05:23 PM
I try to support the local tournaments here in Denver by playing in as many as I can afford. I play good enough to beat the top players a set here and there but not good enough to work thru the field and win it. But my entry money helps to keep the events alive. Call me a "filler"player.

wutang
10-25-2010, 05:28 PM
yes, i'm calling you out - to play pool for money! After a few down years in professional pool in america, things are starting to pick up again. New (and old) promoters, new events and more added money. This is all good for the pros who are trying to earn a living playing the game. Yes, it is true that most of the world's top players travel the globe pursuing fame and fortune at pool.

But we are finally beginning to see an upsurge in professional events here in the usa. So the best thing the players can do is support these events by playing in them. First of all i'm talking about the upcoming steve mizerak championship put on by the seminole tribe in hollywood, florida. This is a $50,000 added tournament, which translates to big money for the high finishers. I'm guessing twenty five to thirty thousand on top! Not a bad payday for someone.

Barry behrman (the u.s. Open promoter) is bringing back his masters event on march 1-5, 2011. This will boast a $100,000 purse with 128 players. Additionally we already have the u.s. Open ($180,000), derby city (nearly $200,000 total), the world pool masters (100k) and the u.s. Open ten ball (85k) both in may. That's six major pool tournaments on our shores, not to mention all the great regional tours with some serious added money, like the two turning stone events (25k added) and the seminole pro tour (all stops soon to be at least 10k added).

To make these events work and continue to be held, it behooves the players to support them. I'd like to once again see the day when we have a major tournament in america every month for the pros to play in. Maybe reno and the peppermill will bring back that event, and maybe a few other events will be created.

There is renewed interest in professional pool in america and that's a good thing. But it is up to the players to support these good promoters and participate in their events. As much as some people would like to make me out to be a hater of last year's galveston event, that is simply not the case. Over $100,000 in total added money was pumped into the various prize funds. Yes, it was short of the promised pay outs, but the players did get paid - in full! Several pros earned a healthy five figures that week, so it wasn't all bad. Who knows, maybe even that event can be resurrected.

The one main thing that the promoters and event schedulers have to keep in mind is the seizing/strong arming of dates. It happened last year with Derby City and another event in Europe. And Galveston and another event I think also in Europe. Even though Europe is far away from here, the Europeans players seem to dedicate themselves to their home events b4 patronizing an American event. Not that there's anything wrong with that but the 'cream of the crop' of players seems to always get divided and both venues miss out on potentially a blockbuster field. I see it now, that the World Straight pool(East brunswick, NJ) more than likely is running their event concurrent with Turning Stone(Verona, NY) for next year in August. Hopefully I'm wrong. Hopefully the dates are at least a week apart so we can see/particpate both!!


Peace

Wutang

(checking for the dates now) :-p

jrt30004
10-25-2010, 05:30 PM
i donate whaen i can afford it. i have played in a few viking (when they were sponsored by viking) events and a gsbt event or two even though i have no shot at winning - those events are just no place for a good c player even if they are handi-capped. it's just not a good time for me to toss money in when i know i have no shot at winning. i do appreciate the experience i've gotten but i can only afford so much experience. i still continue to play in smaller local tournaments at least four times a month though. if i can ever get my table set up and play more i would definately play in more of the regional events. sadly at 39 and only a few years of playing - the pro events are seemingly forever out of my reach:(

david(tx)
10-25-2010, 06:42 PM
Yes, I'm calling you out - to play pool for money! After a few down years in professional pool in America, things are starting to pick up again. New (and old) promoters, new events and more added money. This is all good for the pros who are trying to earn a living playing the game. Yes, it is true that most of the world's top players travel the globe pursuing fame and fortune at pool.

But we are finally beginning to see an upsurge in professional events here in the USA. so the best thing the players can do is support these events by playing in them. First of all I'm talking about the upcoming Steve Mizerak Championship put on by the Seminole Tribe in Hollywood, Florida on Nov. 4-7. This is a $50,000 Added tournament, which translates to big money for the high finishers. I'm guessing twenty five to thirty thousand on top! Not a bad payday for someone.

Barry Behrman (the U.S. Open promoter) is bringing back his Masters event on March 1-5, 2011. This will boast a $100,000 purse with 128 players. Additionally we already have the U.S. Open ($180,000), Derby City (nearly $200,000 total), the World Pool Masters (100K) and the U.S. Open Ten Ball (85K) both in May. That's six major pool tournaments on our shores, not to mention all the great regional tours with some serious added money, like the two Turning Stone events (25K added) and the Seminole Pro Tour (all stops soon to be at least 10K added).

To make these events work and continue to be held, it behooves the players to support them. I'd like to once again see the day when we have a major tournament in America every month for the pros to play in. Maybe Reno and the Peppermill will bring back that event, and maybe a few other events will be created.

There is renewed interest in professional pool in America and that's a good thing. But it is up to the players to support these good promoters and participate in their events. As much as some people would like to make me out to be a hater of last year's Galveston event, that is simply not the case. Over $100,000 in total added money was pumped into the various prize funds. Yes, it was short of the promised pay outs, but the players did get paid - in full! Several pros earned a healthy five figures that week, so it wasn't all bad. Who knows, maybe even that event can be resurrected.



Isn't the Mizerak event limited to 64 ?

Williebetmore
10-25-2010, 06:50 PM
Yes, I'm calling you out -.

JH,
Well, since you ask so nicely...

I hadn't planned on playing any big events next year, but I hear you, and am convinced that a spirit of participation is important if big table events have a future.

I'll commit to play in at least 2 big events next year. I was always donating in the past, but hope to do better this year. You are welcome.

jfais1717
10-25-2010, 07:18 PM
ty jay. i am always amazed at the amount of money that is starting to be added to tournaments. its good to see pool starting to get back in the good graces of peoples hearts. if any of the people who run the tournaments want them streamed they can have my services! http://www.breaknrunz.com
not the best of commentary but at least it looks great! lol

jfais1717@breaknrunz.com

The Renfro
10-25-2010, 07:39 PM
Great post Jay.
If I may, I would like to suggest to the promoters/coordinators of these big events to have more of them available via the Internet.

I know they want to fill the seats because attendance is always good for business, but there are more and more of us who cannot attend because of work/personal/financial reasons, and being able to enjoy some of these matches (for a nominal fee) would be great.

There will be those who complain that they should not have to pay to see matches online, but the game does not need them. This is about putting money back into the game we love so we can keep it going.

One way to insure great coverage is to put Accu-Stats tapes on your xmas list or to buy them as gifts for your friends that share your interest. Pat has always done his best to make sure the players get a cut of sales of the tapes they are on and the 3 camera format is the best way to create a professional product that can be both streamed and produced for DVD.

Currently DCC, The World Straight pool and The US Open are the only 3 events accu-stats produces. It would be nice to have more tournaments recorded and available in their library so we can follow our favorite players in other venues.

lfigueroa
10-26-2010, 07:17 AM
Yes, I'm calling you out - to play pool for money! After a few down years in professional pool in America, things are starting to pick up again. New (and old) promoters, new events and more added money. This is all good for the pros who are trying to earn a living playing the game. Yes, it is true that most of the world's top players travel the globe pursuing fame and fortune at pool.

But we are finally beginning to see an upsurge in professional events here in the USA. so the best thing the players can do is support these events by playing in them. First of all I'm talking about the upcoming Steve Mizerak Championship put on by the Seminole Tribe in Hollywood, Florida on Nov. 4-7. This is a $50,000 Added tournament, which translates to big money for the high finishers. I'm guessing twenty five to thirty thousand on top! Not a bad payday for someone.

Barry Behrman (the U.S. Open promoter) is bringing back his Masters event on March 1-5, 2011. This will boast a $100,000 purse with 128 players. Additionally we already have the U.S. Open ($180,000), Derby City (nearly $200,000 total), the World Pool Masters (100K) and the U.S. Open Ten Ball (85K) both in May. That's six major pool tournaments on our shores, not to mention all the great regional tours with some serious added money, like the two Turning Stone events (25K added) and the Seminole Pro Tour (all stops soon to be at least 10K added).

To make these events work and continue to be held, it behooves the players to support them. I'd like to once again see the day when we have a major tournament in America every month for the pros to play in. Maybe Reno and the Peppermill will bring back that event, and maybe a few other events will be created.

There is renewed interest in professional pool in America and that's a good thing. But it is up to the players to support these good promoters and participate in their events. As much as some people would like to make me out to be a hater of last year's Galveston event, that is simply not the case. Over $100,000 in total added money was pumped into the various prize funds. Yes, it was short of the promised pay outs, but the players did get paid - in full! Several pros earned a healthy five figures that week, so it wasn't all bad. Who knows, maybe even that event can be resurrected.


With my tournament entry fees, I've been donating to The Professional Pool Player's Retirement Fund for a long time now :-) I usually try and go and play in two events a year and maybe go watch a third, like the Mosconi Cup. But... there is nothing like sending in your monies, practicing up, and stepping into the arena.

Playing pool in a tournament is a unique experience, in someways unlike playing it at any other time. The conditions are different, your competitors are unknown, as are their skill levels and strategies. There are distractions, there's pressure, and you must adjust to all of this immediately. It's an interesting test of what you think you know.

Ferinstance, you may think you know how to kick three rails. But under tournament conditions, it really is the acid test. Do you really know how to instantly calculate the path the cue ball must take, the right amount of spin, the right speed, and compensate for the new cushions, cloth, and balls? You either know how to do it, or you don't. Whether you do or not is out there for the whole world to see and there's no hiding what you can and can't do. At an even more basic level are the simple shots you think you should be able to make. During a tournament, you can learn that there are a whole slew of shots you thought you knew, but can't execute consistently when the heat is on. I'm not talking about really tough shots, I'm talking about shots that you think you can make 10 out of 10. Maybe going to play in a tournament is like getting dressed in the dark and then you go out into the bright sunlight and discover that you've got socks on that don't match. Playing in a tournament will alert you to things you should work on to reach the next level.

A tournament, because of the severity of the test, also let's you see what works and what does not -- tournaments provide you with the ultimate "where the rubber meets the road" venue. Kinda like taking your little hot rod that you've been lovingly tinkering with, out for a spin on the Mercedes-Benz test track in Stuttgart.

A tournament also gives you the opportunity to see a wide variety of approaches to the game. You get to see shots that you might not regularly play. But if you see how they're executed and whether they're effective, you can practice them and make them part of your personal arsenal. That's another great learning opportunity.

Lastly, I think playing in a tournament, imbues you with a sense of confidence you can't get any other way. Stepping into "the arena" and taking on all comers on a level playing field, so to speak, gives you a very accurate sense of where your game -- and you yourself as a competitor -- stand in the universe of pool players.

Soooooooo, I guess what I'm trying to say is that Jay's suggestion is a good one worth taking to heart. Hopefully, some of you, in the very near future, or at least the next time you have the opportunity, will jump in the deep end. It won't be easy, it might not be cheap, and it will take time, effort, and courage on your part. No, I'm not saying everyone should sign up for the next Open, (though there are some of you that should). I'm saying there are tournaments all over the place that, at some level or another, will let you experience the thrill of victory and the agony of defeat. More significantly, it will give you a great way to learn so many different but related things. If you don't compete in a tournament now and again, and test yourself and your game, you're cheating yourself.

Well, that's it. Now get out there and be safe.

Lou Figueroa

mosconiac
10-26-2010, 08:37 AM
Has anyone else noticed the cyclical nature of pool? It's on a roughly 20-25 year cycle.

Boom in the mid 60's (lasting for 10 or so years).

Boom in the late 80's (lasting 10 or so years).

Boom in the...early 10's? Maybe just maybe its about to happen. It sure feels like our 10 year drought is about over.

Unfortunately, so many rooms have succumbed to the latest recession that it might impede the next boom...maybe not??!?!?

tom mcgonagle
10-26-2010, 09:15 AM
Jay,

I couldn't agree with you more. If we can't support the game we love, no one else is going to do it for us.

I believe the interest is back but we have to keep the momentum going.

If you look at the events leading up to the U. S. Open a lot of the interest may have been generated from these events.

The Shane and Mika matchup drew great interest.

I also believe, letting women into the Open , for the first time, helped fiil the field and created more spectator interest. It's a shame the likes of Karen and Allison weren't there.

I'm doing my best to help support the game, but I'm only one person. I'm playing in Providence next month in the Ocean State Classic. It's a Joss event with $5,000 added. The following month I'll be playing at Turning Stone.

The people from the Northeast should flock to both of these events. If not to play, they should at least come to watch. I've looked into the stands many a time, at Turning Stone, and shook my head as to why there aren't thousands of people coming to watch this event. IT"S FREE. It's also the best place I've ever been to watch an event. You can easily sit in the stands and watch four tables. There has to be at least one interesting match being played at all times.

I'd like to see a few more senior events. Of course being a senior is one of my motives. I'd also like to know where I stand as far as the rest of the seniors out there. I didn't get to compete against the people my age as much as I would have liked to when I was younger. Work and family made it difficult. Now that I'm retired, I'd like a chance to compete against the legends of my generation. I think it would be fun and draw good sized fields.

Let's get busy. There's a lot of pool to be played. Don't get left behind.

_______________________________

http://tommcgonaglerightoncue.com

Big Perm
10-26-2010, 09:25 AM
Jay, I like your spirit, nice post....

Unfortunately, I suck at pool so cannot help personally :D

Signed,

The Big Perm with the small game....

:D

Holly
10-26-2010, 09:35 AM
Thanks Jay for this thread and giving a plug to all the major U.S. events, including our U.S. Open 10-Ball tourney. All those involved in these events do so because they love the sport and want to see it succeed, I been to each of these event other than the Miz event produced by the exceptional team with the Seminole Tribe. It is important that the players support these events, it allows us to continue the cycle of also supporting you.


I"M ABOUT TO GIVE A PLUG HERE... :) BUT IT IS VERY RELEVANT
THE CONNECTION BETWEEN THE USA POOL LEAGUE AND PROFESSIONAL POOL IN THE U.S.

One of CSI's goals with the USA Pool League (www.playusapool.com) is to take the following amount from CSI to a pro fund: $.50 (cents) per USAPL league player per week of league play. From day one, we've been putting this money aside as intended.

We soft launched the USAPL, as they say, in 2009 and have been more assertive this year. The league has been growing. Here are some hard numbers to put this in perspective:

for example:

USAPL 10,000 members (we are not here yet, but are growing)
Average of two 12 week sessions (24 weeks of play annually - which may be conservative, but a decent average)
= $120,000 annually for the pro fund

CSI will be using this money to fund pro level events in addition to pro to amatuer outreach and training events. It is vital for the sport in the U.S. to develope a real relationship between the various segments of the sport.

Thanks again and hope to see you soon Jay...prolly at The Swanee at Hard Times in Belflower :) in Feb.

Holly
10-26-2010, 09:39 AM
All those tournament sound great! But not just the players need to support them the fans need to show up at the events and suport them, next year I'll be planning some of my vacations to attend some of them and do my little bit to help ( and have a ton of fun in the process!) :)

Agree. This past May we were very appreciative and thrilled with the support by the players at our BCAPL National of the U.S. Open 10-Ball. We work continously to bring the two together. The large monitors and feed into the Riviera Guest rooms of the tourney were also a hit.

Thanks for your support and if you are at the Riv. next May would love to meet and say thanks in person too.

Koop
10-26-2010, 09:50 AM
With my tournament entry fees, I've been donating to The Professional Pool Player's Retirement Fund for a long time now :-) I usually try and go and play in two events a year and maybe go watch a third, like the Mosconi Cup. But... there is nothing like sending in your monies, practicing up, and stepping into the arena.

Playing pool in a tournament is a unique experience, in someways unlike playing it at any other time. The conditions are different, your competitors are unknown, as are their skill levels and strategies. There are distractions, there's pressure, and you must adjust to all of this immediately. It's an interesting test of what you think you know.

Ferinstance, you may think you know how to kick three rails. But under tournament conditions, it really is the acid test. Do you really know how to instantly calculate the path the cue ball must take, the right amount of spin, the right speed, and compensate for the new cushions, cloth, and balls? You either know how to do it, or you don't. Whether you do or not is out there for the whole world to see and there's no hiding what you can and can't do. At an even more basic level are the simple shots you think you should be able to make. During a tournament, you can learn that there are a whole slew of shots you thought you knew, but can't execute consistently when the heat is on. I'm not talking about really tough shots, I'm talking about shots that you think you can make 10 out of 10. Maybe going to play in a tournament is like getting dressed in the dark and then you go out into the bright sunlight and discover that you've got socks on that don't match. Playing in a tournament will alert you to things you should work on to reach the next level.

A tournament, because of the severity of the test, also let's you see what works and what does not -- tournaments provide you with the ultimate "where the rubber meets the road" venue. Kinda like taking your little hot rod that you've been lovingly tinkering with, out for a spin on the Mercedes-Benz test track in Stuttgart.

A tournament also gives you the opportunity to see a wide variety of approaches to the game. You get to see shots that you might not regularly play. But if you see how they're executed and whether they're effective, you can practice them and make them part of your personal arsenal. That's another great learning opportunity.

Lastly, I think playing in a tournament, imbues you with a sense of confidence you can't get any other way. Stepping into "the arena" and taking on all comers on a level playing field, so to speak, gives you a very accurate sense of where your game -- and you yourself as a competitor -- stand in the universe of pool players.

Soooooooo, I guess what I'm trying to say is that Jay's suggestion is a good one worth taking to heart. Hopefully, some of you, in the very near future, or at least the next time you have the opportunity, will jump in the deep end. It won't be easy, it might not be cheap, and it will take time, effort, and courage on your part. No, I'm not saying everyone should sign up for the next Open, (though there are some of you that should). I'm saying there are tournaments all over the place that, at some level or another, will let you experience the thrill of victory and the agony of defeat. More significantly, it will give you a great way to learn so many different but related things. If you don't compete in a tournament now and again, and test yourself and your game, you're cheating yourself.

Well, that's it. Now get out there and be safe.

Lou Figueroa

What a great post and perfectly stated, IMO.

Holly
10-26-2010, 09:51 AM
Great post Jay.
If I may, I would like to suggest to the promoters/coordinators of these big events to have more of them available via the Internet.

I know they want to fill the seats because attendance is always good for business, but there are more and more of us who cannot attend because of work/personal/financial reasons, and being able to enjoy some of these matches (for a nominal fee) would be great.

There will be those who complain that they should not have to pay to see matches online, but the game does not need them. This is about putting money back into the game we love so we can keep it going.

Thanks and agree. There are excellent live streamers all over the country. Our TAR brother's have worked closely with CSI for a couple of years. The work Justin and his team produced at the NCS and U.S. Open 10-Ball were excellent. At the 10-Ball in particular it was a good sized team with 3 cameras (thanks to Nathan and Run Out Media guys too). We used large film style screens in the Riv. and had a direct feed to one of the channels in the Riv. guest rooms. There were issues here and there with the feed, but was excellent.

The pruduction by Dustin and Samm at this years US Open 9 Ball on AZB was the best I've every seen her do, was top notch all the way. And I could go on for hours how amazing Accu-Stats has been to this industry.

The issue is historically PPV has not covered barely, if at all even, the cost of production. So how do we change that...

What pool needs is more mainstream exposure. I personal include on all press releases I send from CSI to two Sr. writers at Sports Illustrated...and have yet to ever see any story about pool or billiards in the publication.

If anyone in the sport who reads this has any influence whether it's your local paper, a radio station, TV station...anything media related, the sport needs your nudge and support. If you know of any mainstream media group that would legitimately welcome releases about pool and billiard news, please let me know at holly@playcsipool.com.

Thanks :)

Jaden
10-26-2010, 10:33 AM
Jay, do you know if the Seminole tour is planning on coming back to socal?

Jaden

beetle
02-15-2011, 09:40 PM
Nice post and nice thread that died too young. <bump>

With my tournament entry fees, I've been donating to The Professional Pool Player's Retirement Fund for a long time now :-) I usually try and go and play in two events a year and maybe go watch a third, like the Mosconi Cup. But... there is nothing like sending in your monies, practicing up, and stepping into the arena.

Playing pool in a tournament is a unique experience, in someways unlike playing it at any other time. The conditions are different, your competitors are unknown, as are their skill levels and strategies. There are distractions, there's pressure, and you must adjust to all of this immediately. It's an interesting test of what you think you know.

Ferinstance, you may think you know how to kick three rails. But under tournament conditions, it really is the acid test. Do you really know how to instantly calculate the path the cue ball must take, the right amount of spin, the right speed, and compensate for the new cushions, cloth, and balls? You either know how to do it, or you don't. Whether you do or not is out there for the whole world to see and there's no hiding what you can and can't do. At an even more basic level are the simple shots you think you should be able to make. During a tournament, you can learn that there are a whole slew of shots you thought you knew, but can't execute consistently when the heat is on. I'm not talking about really tough shots, I'm talking about shots that you think you can make 10 out of 10. Maybe going to play in a tournament is like getting dressed in the dark and then you go out into the bright sunlight and discover that you've got socks on that don't match. Playing in a tournament will alert you to things you should work on to reach the next level.

A tournament, because of the severity of the test, also let's you see what works and what does not -- tournaments provide you with the ultimate "where the rubber meets the road" venue. Kinda like taking your little hot rod that you've been lovingly tinkering with, out for a spin on the Mercedes-Benz test track in Stuttgart.

A tournament also gives you the opportunity to see a wide variety of approaches to the game. You get to see shots that you might not regularly play. But if you see how they're executed and whether they're effective, you can practice them and make them part of your personal arsenal. That's another great learning opportunity.

Lastly, I think playing in a tournament, imbues you with a sense of confidence you can't get any other way. Stepping into "the arena" and taking on all comers on a level playing field, so to speak, gives you a very accurate sense of where your game -- and you yourself as a competitor -- stand in the universe of pool players.

Soooooooo, I guess what I'm trying to say is that Jay's suggestion is a good one worth taking to heart. Hopefully, some of you, in the very near future, or at least the next time you have the opportunity, will jump in the deep end. It won't be easy, it might not be cheap, and it will take time, effort, and courage on your part. No, I'm not saying everyone should sign up for the next Open, (though there are some of you that should). I'm saying there are tournaments all over the place that, at some level or another, will let you experience the thrill of victory and the agony of defeat. More significantly, it will give you a great way to learn so many different but related things. If you don't compete in a tournament now and again, and test yourself and your game, you're cheating yourself.

Well, that's it. Now get out there and be safe.

Lou Figueroa