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View Full Version : Question on shaft taper for a novice player


justin962
05-28-2011, 07:31 PM
Hello all and allow me to say I am looking forward to becoming a member of these forums. I intend on being a sponge these next few months and soak up as much valuable information as possible. I'm excited to increase my knowledge and skill level in the game of billiards.

Recently my friend and I have been going to our local pool halls 2-3x times per week. He's loaned me his Players cue each time but it has gotten to the point where I want to take my game to the next level. I consider myself in between beginner and novice. I can make most shots on a table, but am in the process of learning english and cue ball placement after shots.

With that said, I've ordered a custom cue and have the options of weight, tip size, and shaft taper. I use an open bridge (hands are too sweaty for closed bridge. will probably try out a glove soon) and am lost when it comes to shaft tapering.

For a player of my skill level (aka: my learning cue/ won't be my last cue to buy) should I go with a pro or a conical taper?

From what I've gathered, a conical/euro taper will create more ball energy, whereas a pro taper sends the energy down the cue? If it helps, the Players cue I use is 17oz and when I play with my friend's 18oz Star it feels much more solid when I strike, which I prefer. If I go with a pro taper, what length should I choose to ensure a solid strike feel?

Sorry for all the newbie questions, it's just that I've had a difficult time finding a layman's guide for shaft tapering.

Thank you very much in advance.

johnqbs
05-28-2011, 08:39 PM
For sure welcome to AZ, good to have you. about shaft question the main
thing is what feels and works best for you. most playes prefer the pro taper. A 13mm dia. 12 inch pro taper is about standard and the most popular. What I like for me is a 13mm with a 14 or 15 taper. Before you
decide try out a few different cues. Hope this is some help to you.
Take care, johnqbs

PistolPat
05-28-2011, 09:13 PM
as far as your skill level and what taper...it's really a personal preference type of thing. if you play with an open bridge then it really shouldnt matter. BUT if you play with any type of a closed bridge thats where you want to start figuring out what fits you best. Also be aware that the conical taper aka euro taper adverse to the pro taper plays differently. The pro shaft's taper isnt as stiff as the conical taper for the obvious shape of the taper. either or you can play with a conical or pro taper with a 10mm shaft to a 15mm shaft tip if you play with an open bridge, thats just my opinion from my experience in this when starting out years ago...

justin962
05-28-2011, 09:47 PM
Thanks a lot for your replies. Since this is my first real cue, I'll stick to the standard sizes of 13mm, 12" pro. Over time I imagine I'll get a better feel (and use other people's) for what I like, especially as I develop a closed bridge game.

Thanks again John and Pat.

OneIron
05-29-2011, 07:15 AM
Wouldn't use a 17oz for sure. I personally like a 19oz cue.

onepocketron
05-29-2011, 04:53 PM
I agree with what has been posted. I would hit a few balls with the cue you decide to buy, new or used. I personally use a 13 mm pro taper myself and really like it. Thicker will tend to be stiffer, and thinner will tend to be whippy. Welcome to the site and good luck of finding a cue you really love.

Bamacues
05-29-2011, 05:12 PM
IMO, start out with a 12" pro taper, 12.75mm to 13mm. There is a reason that the majority of high quality cuemakers build their cues with a pro taper.

A conical taper will have a tendency to be stiffer, and you won't get the movement that you need...you see those shafts more in 3-cushion, etc.

Many newer players also like the long, relaxed taper similar to Meucci, but those shafts have a tendency to be a lot more "whippy".

If you start with a basic shaft taper which is proven, you can adjust it over time, as your game improves. Don't mess with a lot of different tapers, that will just screw you up. You will find that you will become comfortable with a good quality shaft, then really work on finding which tip you like best. Once you have a quality cue with adecent shaft, the tip choice is the most important item.

Don't listen to those guys who try to tout "special" tapers and how great they are. If they were that great, doo-doo brain would not be the only guy in the pool room with one of them.

Joe

ChicagoRJ
05-29-2011, 06:02 PM
Wouldn't use a 17oz for sure. I personally like a 19oz cue.

. I consider myself in between beginner and novice. I can make most shots on a table, but am in the process of learning english and cue ball placement after shots.

.


First thing you should do as a beginner/novice is not even use the word "English".... That's like learning to how land a plane but not how to take off yet. You need to keep around the horizontal axis... follow, stop, and draw. That and good angles will get you where you need to go at your level, and will allow you the ability to really get use to cut shots, and see how the cueball reacts off the ob as well as the cushion before you ever begin the "english" phase..... JMHO

td873
05-29-2011, 07:40 PM
From what I've gathered, a conical/euro taper will create more ball energy, whereas a pro taper sends the energy down the cue? If it helps, the Players cue I use is 17oz and when I play with my friend's 18oz Star it feels much more solid when I strike, which I prefer. If I go with a pro taper, what length should I choose to ensure a solid strike feel?
Because of the length of time the tip is in contact with the cue ball, there will little (if any) different in the amount of energy imparted to the cue ball because of the tip. Put another way, energy imparted to the cue ball will not be affected by taper.

As for feel in your hand, there may be a different propogation of energy based on taper, but this is also highly unlikely. Feedback is most often a direct function of the grip on the cue (light vs death grip), type of wood and joint type. Probably in that order as well.

I would put taper WAY down the list of things to worry about at the novice level. Start with stance, stroke, vision, pocketing, etc. etc. Then start worrying about equipment. Differences are virtually undetectable for most until they have a solid baseline that they can compare differences to.

Lastly, when I was coming up in pool, to break from beginner/novice to intermediate, I was at the pool hall for 2-3 hours per day. ;)

-td