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measureman
05-30-2011, 08:22 AM
This came up in the Ask the cue maker forum.
I have an old Dufferin two piece cue with the pin in the shaft and an Aluminum joint and no wrap. Some have a green Maple leaf and some have a red Maple leaf on the butt. Mine has the red one. What does the different colors mean?

brokenarrowjbe
05-30-2011, 08:26 AM
That's what color dufferin used that day? Never heard there was any real difference, some say the green one's are more rare, but probably just marketing hype to make more money, John

Cuebuddy
05-30-2011, 09:06 AM
I have always wondered this myself. I have seen way more red then green and have about eight Dufferins at this time. But I would agree with
brokenarrowjbe that red or green did not denote anything special about the cues.

pt109
05-30-2011, 09:12 AM
This came up in the Ask the cue maker forum.
I have an old Dufferin two piece cue with the pin in the shaft and an Aluminum joint and no wrap. Some have a green Maple leaf and some have a red Maple leaf on the butt. Mine has the red one. What does the different colors mean?

Had a lot of Dufferins pass through my hands.
My experience tells me that the red maple leaf could be old or new....
...all my old ones have them.
The green leafs were produced later....but lots of reds were also.

(ASIDE)..I used to brag that my Schon had an 'umlaut' over the 'o'
but I was in the shop and Evan Clarke told me he put it on some cues
randomly...didn't really denote anything..:(

Jim Baxter
05-30-2011, 09:17 AM
Acording to Duffern , when I was ordering them , they told me no difference in cue . Not nearly as many green . Jim

phread59
05-30-2011, 09:46 AM
PT the Umlaut does mean something. When you put an umlaut over a vowel it would change the pronunciation of said vowel. I believe in the case of an "O" it would change the sound of the "O" to more of an "ER sound. It has meaning in German grammer but I forget the derivation. German was over 35 years ago.

Basicly it would make Schon into "Schern". Which is German for beutiful as I recall.

Mark Shuman

greyghost
05-30-2011, 11:15 AM
PT the Umlaut does mean something. When you put an umlaut over a vowel it would change the pronunciation of said vowel. I believe in the case of an "O" it would change the sound of the "O" to more of an "ER sound. It has meaning in German grammer but I forget the derivation. German was over 35 years ago.

Basicly it would make Schon into "Schern". Which is German for beutiful as I recall.

Mark Shuman

yes it is does mean beautiful in german..........but the umlat a long O.....the ending is pronounced the same as OWN...........basically the same phonetic as the english word SHOWN:thumbup:

pt109
05-30-2011, 11:20 AM
PT the Umlaut does mean something. When you put an umlaut over a vowel it would change the pronunciation of said vowel. I believe in the case of an "O" it would change the sound of the "O" to more of an "ER sound. It has meaning in German grammer but I forget the derivation. German was over 35 years ago.

Basicly it would make Schon into "Schern". Which is German for beutiful as I recall.

Mark Shuman

Good info...Terry Romine explained the 'beautiful' and I hepped him up to
the 'umlaut' pronunciation because of the German author Goethe....
..many are surprised to find it is pronounced - Gu[r]tuh-

What has this got to do with Dufferin cues, you say?
The man who made Dufferin an internationally known company had a
very German name...Al Selinger...and one of the finest people I've known.