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View Full Version : Black marker on the tip sides?


cesarmorales
06-01-2011, 12:56 AM
Nowdays I take my cue to the cue shop and for a few bucks they clean the shaft and shape the tip.

Thirty years ago I did my own tips and worked on them every few days, cleaned the shaft with thousand grit sandpaper. Then I would shape the tip and run a black marker around the edge of the tip. I would use a match book or dollar bill to rub over the tip end of the cue to burnish it.

This was before the layered tips we have now and I tried this old trick on a layered tip the other day. The new morri tip was bulging out of the sides after a day or two of playing and I was getting bad hits about every twenty shots. I had the cue shop grind down the tip to about fifty percent and then I tried out the black marker trick on the edges of the tip.

Hey, it appeared to work. I am not getting those weird hits anymore.

Anyone else use a black marker on their tips anymore, it was what we all did back then.

pwd72s
06-01-2011, 01:01 AM
sounds like the aromic chemicals in the marker hurt the glue of the layers? Just a guess...

Nostroke
06-01-2011, 01:57 AM
Yeah everybody did it but i had always thought it was just to maintain a consistent look when down on the shot.

PaulieB
06-01-2011, 02:19 AM
I had the cue shop grind down the tip to about fifty percent and then I tried out the black marker trick on the edges of the tip.

Hey, it appeared to work.

Why would you think it's the magic marker on the side of your tip that is working and not the fact that you had your tip ground down to half its height?

Gotta think as far as mechanics are concerned, cutting your tip in half is gonna change things more than adding color to it.

Blue Hog ridr
06-01-2011, 05:16 AM
A couple of tips I use don't burnish up too good. I use a brown furniture spot fixer to color them and then they burnish better.
They come in the same form as a Magic Marker.

Altho I tape off the ferrule, it can still bleed thru but is much easier to remove from the ferrule than a black marker.

You can buy a package of 3 different shades at the Dollar Store usually.

Cue Guru
06-01-2011, 05:17 AM
I used to color them too- now-a-days I don't bother.

I just burnish on the lathe with a bit of spittle.

Blue Hog ridr
06-01-2011, 05:22 AM
Yes, good ole fashioned spittle.
Mine tends to have some Skoal mixed in with it most times.

whammo57
06-01-2011, 05:31 AM
Yes, good ole fashioned spittle.
Mine tends to have some Skoal mixed in with it most times.

yuck!!!

lol

Kim

Tramp Steamer
06-01-2011, 05:44 AM
Chris Hightower, always recommended spittle, but insisted upon "high quality spittle". I asked him once if he would sell me some, but he said that mine was probably good enough. Turns out he was right.
Marking pens are not a good idea, especially with layered tips. The esters in the dye will attack the glue that bonds the layers. Probably not all the way through any one layer, because of the rapid drying time of the marker, but at least enough to damage the tip as you have described.
I think Blue is on to something with the tobacco juice. :)

Winston846
06-01-2011, 08:04 AM
I just use a little spit myself to burnish and I mask off the ferrule and make a black line with a Sharpie. Never knew what this really did beyond aesthetics, but I also use it as an indicator that it's time to change the tip.

Black-Balled
06-01-2011, 08:11 AM
I had tips done by Charlie Fleming and he had a special polish for blackennind the sides. I don't recall the maker, but is was specifically marketed as a pool good and was in a little bottle with an applicator...He said it appeared to be basically shoe polish.

I have had it for a long time and it has not faded.

Cue Guru
06-01-2011, 10:57 AM
Seems like shoe polish (or dye) would work well for the purpose...

rrich1
06-01-2011, 11:47 AM
just had my tip put on a couple of weeks ago and he used a sharpie for the sides of the tip before he burnished it.

BluesTele
06-01-2011, 12:39 PM
i've used a sharpie/marker for years on the tip shoulder,

it looks nice and also helps against mushrooming.

Tommy-D
06-01-2011, 02:51 PM
> I've been doing this for 20 years on my Schon shafts,and for over a decade on tips for customers. Because of skills I built as a kid building models,I used to do it with just a plain wedge tipped marker well enough I never got any of it on my ivory ferrules that a piece of 600 turning the shaft BY HAND couldn't clean up.

I've seen this topic come up here several times over the years. Read where certain people complained about what it did to their cloth,or didn't like the fact that whoever put the last tip on it did it without asking.

I started doing it on my own to maintain the look my Schon shafts had out of the box,dead black,shiny and just PIMPIN :thumbup:.

I've tried it myself on layered tips,but sometimes it can have a negative effect on the glue bond,which was/is a known issue supposedly due to a chemical reaction with the ink. I had one of the old 25.00 Mooris fail on me a little at a time that way,and a few Talisman. That doesn't mean I won't do it,but since I just started installing layered tips for people in public,I intend to ask if they want it done,and inform them of the possibility.

My local customers like it to the point I don't even have to ask. With this being the case,every one piece tip I've done since upgrading to a lathe in '98 has been done with a Sharpie or something similar. You can even make an Elk Master look good with it. I also use this to track my own work visually. An added effect of this is that it fills the pores on the sides,and can help cut down mushrooming,and makes it easier to see if there is,and exposes problems that you might not see till the sides fluff out around 8 hours of play.

I agree with a previous poster,it helps give people a cleaner sight picture on the cue ball,least it does for me.

I have been using the Industrial Sharpie with the yellow rubber grip for a few years now. Tommy D.

danquixote
06-01-2011, 02:58 PM
I've used the Porper tip burnishing liquid for some time now on Mori med's.
seems to work pretty well with no detrimental effects on the layered tip.

whammo57
06-01-2011, 03:13 PM
I use a dark brown marker and then burnish it with a little cue wax and a paper towel until the paper towel stays clean. I don't want any marks on the balls or the cloth.

Kim

lukemindish
06-01-2011, 05:03 PM
I just tried it with a sharpie and dollar bill and it worked great...

Blue Hog ridr
06-01-2011, 11:31 PM
Do you have any brown or black shoe polish?
Tape your ferrule off and put a small dab on a soft paper towel.
I'm thinking that you could polish it up real shiny. Its not liquid so it won't bleed thru onto your ferrule and if by slight chance you do get some on the ferrule, you should be able to remove it quickly.

cesarmorales
06-02-2011, 02:18 AM
I am glad to see other people are still doing this because when I mentioned it to my mentor he asked me why I did such a stupid thing.

But from what I am getting in the responses, it MAY not be a good thing for layered tips.

Morgantownfats
06-02-2011, 02:59 AM
If you look at a Scruggs or Frey tip on a new shaft they have made they use Triangle tips and they are always black on the sides. The triangle and elkmaster tips look real grey unless you black them out. I have been using a black sharpie for years with no problem. I trim and burnish the tip good before applying the sharpie to the sides and let the marker dry a min or two before reburnisning. The sedond time around i use a little cue wax on my finger and burn it in with a paper towell. Seems to work good. Now for lepros i do use the scratch fix furniture markers. Makes em look nice and uniform for your customer

conetip
06-02-2011, 03:49 AM
I am glad to see other people are still doing this because when I mentioned it to my mentor he asked me why I did such a stupid thing.

But from what I am getting in the responses, it MAY not be a good thing for layered tips.

Layered tips are very sensative to heat.
I did a test on a layered tip. I trimmed it, gave it a small burnish. Then got the sharpie to make the outer black and then gave it a shine.
Then I turned it down to see how far the sharpie had penetrated into the sides. It was only about .05 mm (close to 2 thou of inch) Not what I expected.
If the layered tips are failing, I don't think it is from the ink of the marker pen. Some other factor will be the cause of the delamination.

malidave
06-02-2011, 08:42 AM
I had tips done by Charlie Fleming and he had a special polish for blackennind the sides. I don't recall the maker, but is was specifically marketed as a pool good and was in a little bottle with an applicator...He said it appeared to be basically shoe polish.

I have had it for a long time and it has not faded.

Overall, it is just for appearance, I doubt a little marker will delaminate or hurt a tip.

Basically this is one of the products as another poster mentioned.

http://www.porper.com/images/Catalog/product_photo/90_photo.jpg