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skybaw
06-02-2011, 11:18 PM
Does anybody use a breathing method when stroking the cue? Do you inhale when drawing the cue back and exhale on the forward stroke? Or do you hold your breath for the duration of the stroke?

Sky
Songtan Pool League, South Korea

The Dster
06-03-2011, 12:09 AM
I hold my breath the whole match, not just when :thumbup:shooting... Welcome to the forum.. The Dster.

Masayoshi
06-03-2011, 01:08 AM
Don't worry about it too much. As long as you aren't breathing abnormally, you should be fine. Worrying specifically about how you breathe is just one more distraction to take your mind off what actually matters.

crappoolguy
06-03-2011, 01:34 AM
As a snooker player it's very important to hold your breath when down on the shot. This is because the cue in held in tight to the chest and as breathing causes the chest to move in and out, the cue will also therefore be moving from side to side. I'm guessing this makes no difference to the majority of pool players but if you hold the cue into the chest DON'T BREATH :)

Black-Balled
06-03-2011, 06:18 AM
Thinking about your breating while shooting is crucial to success. I would say it is second only to aim, alignment, knowledge and execution, in its role as an effective pool ingredient.

Keep thinking about the air...

SpiderWebComm
06-03-2011, 06:28 AM
I've noticed Hopkins def does some kind of technique. As he approaches his shot, I keep hearing PFFFFT PFFFFFT... as if he's sucking in air and holding it. I also noticed Shadow does the same thing. I'll ask and get back to this thread.

People tend to think breathing in/out while playing was a player's inside joke for messing someone up. But, there might be techniques used to control pressure and/or increase concentration (to get into the zone).

Tramp Steamer
06-03-2011, 06:40 AM
Welcome to the forum, Sky.
That's a really good question for your very first one. Reminds me of my first question. "How do you get snot out of corduroy?"
I really don't think there is a truly definitive answer here, but in my opinion breathing is highly overrated. I know, I know, you've got to breathe in order for the life processes to continue, but c'mon. It just ain't that big of a deal.
As a matter of fact it can be hazardous to your health. I remember one time I was sitting in a very small room, talking on the telephone, when this guy rushes in, farts real big, then slams the door shut and locks it. I thought I was gonna die.
But anyway... what was the question? :)

Johnnyt
06-03-2011, 06:43 AM
I haven't thought about my breathing playing pool for over 20 years. One night I was playing some cheap sets of 9-ball when Buddy Hall walked up to the table. I was on the 6-ball and was going to run out. He said, "you know you've been holding your breath since the 1-ball? For Christs sake take a breath before you pass out".
Not only did I not make the 6-ball, I couldn't run thee in a row for about a week trying to breath right. Johnnyt

Quesports
06-03-2011, 07:21 AM
Yes, I use breathing techniques when playing pool. I do this just prior to and during any match. I slowly inhale as much as I can possibly through my nose, I hold that breath for the same amount of time it takes to inhale, then exhale through my mouth at the same rate. Do it 5 or 6 times succesively. This method slows your pulse/heart rate and reoxygenates your blood. It will help you to remain calmer when you get back to the table if your lucky enough to. It's a very well known technique for athletes in many sports. I raced bicycles when I was younger and learned about how important breathing techniques are in sports.

justnum
06-03-2011, 07:29 AM
I am practicing a Karate breath for my stroke, so that before I hit the cue ball I give myself a warning that the cue ball is about to be hit and that I must stay focused and aware of my surroundings.

Also, breathing heavy can screw someone's stroke, take deep breaths and try to limit the motion of your shoulder, it requires tension, the difficulty is knowing how much tension is needed.

Sit straight up in a chair and breath heavy and deep, notice your shoulder move. Now think about keeping your shoulder still and breath heavy, notice the difference.

During an intense matchup most people change their breathing pattern, or under stress or pressure or when your excited.

BluesTele
06-03-2011, 07:34 AM
[QUOTE=skybaw;3041705]Does anybody use a breathing method when stroking the cue? Do you inhale when drawing the cue back and exhale on the forward stroke? Or do you hold your breath for the duration of the stroke?




oh great.......as if i didn't have enough, now you gave me another thing to think about when i'm getting down on my shot......
just kidding skybaw.....i think ...:(

hunger strike
06-03-2011, 07:43 AM
If you have asked the question then it seems to me that there must be a problem for you with breathing while shooting. Ignore the guys dismissing you about it. Anyway, I was told that C.J. Wiley used breathing techniques while playing, and I have a vague recollection that it had something to do with martial arts as well. I sometimes forget to breathe while shooting. I went to CJ's poolroom years ago to specifically ask him about this but he was not there at the time. Someone with CJ's contact info may want to pass it on to the OP here.
You know, if you're nervous it may increase your respiratory rate. Do you think you may need to address this first?

whammo57
06-03-2011, 07:49 AM
That's what you ask your opponent when you are losing.

It's a Vulcan mind worm.....

Kim

paksat
06-03-2011, 08:28 AM
smooth breath out as you go through the ball..

Strike First
06-03-2011, 08:45 AM
you guys are sharking yourselves

steev
06-03-2011, 08:53 AM
Although I try to breathe normally during the shot, I find a deep breath before I get down helps. Better breathing = more relaxed = allows you to concentrate better.

-s

tucson9ball
06-03-2011, 11:10 AM
Does anybody use a breathing method when stroking the cue? Do you inhale when drawing the cue back and exhale on the forward stroke? Or do you hold your breath for the duration of the stroke?

Sky
Songtan Pool League, South Korea



Wait , wait, I saw this in a mvie. "Bull Durham", the pitcher was told to breathe through his eyelids. LMAO :grin:

Woof Biscuit
06-03-2011, 11:22 AM
Don't worry about it too much. As long as you aren't breathing abnormally, you should be fine. Worrying specifically about how you breathe is just one more distraction to take your mind off what actually matters.

I agree. Just make sure your not holding your breath and you should be OK.

LAlouie
06-03-2011, 12:20 PM
Does anybody use a breathing method when stroking the cue? Do you inhale when drawing the cue back and exhale on the forward stroke? Or do you hold your breath for the duration of the stroke?

Sky
Songtan Pool League, South Korea

You always exhale on the execution of a movement. Batter doesn't swing his bat and inhale at the same time. The act of inhaling is an execution in itself, therefore inhaling and stroking means you're executing two things at once. exhaling is a release.

center pocket
06-03-2011, 12:20 PM
I've noticed Hopkins def does some kind of technique. As he approaches his shot, I keep hearing PFFFFT PFFFFFT... as if he's sucking in air and holding it. I also noticed Shadow does the same thing. I'll ask and get back to this thread.

I do this all the time especially when i am really focused. It just happens without me even trying.

Falcon Eddie
06-03-2011, 03:21 PM
This is great for pool players for meditation in movement while deep abdominal breathing
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KDXkjIi5Gik

TX Poolnut
06-03-2011, 03:25 PM
I don't think about it. Just shoot.

Slide Rule
06-03-2011, 05:18 PM
Welcome to the forum, Sky.
That's a really good question for your very first one. Reminds me of my first question. "How do get snot out of corduroy?"
I really don't think there is a truly definitive answer here, but in my opinion breathing is highly overrated. I know, I know, you've got to breathe in order for the life processes to continue, but c'mon. It just ain't that big of a deal.
As a matter of fact it can be hazardous to your health. I remember one time I was sitting in a very small room, talking on the telephone, when this guy rushes in, farts real big, then slams the door shut and locks it. I thought I was gonna die.
But anyway... what was the question? :)

Hey Tramp.

How do you get snot out?

I normally use a finger or a tissue. Never considered corduroy.

Island Drive
06-03-2011, 05:22 PM
Does anybody use a breathing method when stroking the cue? Do you inhale when drawing the cue back and exhale on the forward stroke? Or do you hold your breath for the duration of the stroke?

Sky
Songtan Pool League, South Korea

Method??? your way too analytical, just pause your in/out breathing :grin-square:during execution.

SirNoobs
06-03-2011, 06:03 PM
Breathing is the next best thing in playing good pool. Earl's going to be so focused on his breathing technique that he wears a respirator and carries an oxygen tank on his back so he doesn't have to do it manually.

Yukon Ed
06-03-2011, 07:01 PM
Snipers use breathing techniques when shooting, check out this site:

http://www.ghilliesuitsonline.com/brteforsn.html

Cameron Smith
06-03-2011, 09:24 PM
Snipers use breathing techniques when shooting, check out this site:

http://www.ghilliesuitsonline.com/brteforsn.html

Ya, a excellent older snooker player told me about how you use breathing techniques when you shoot.

If anything though, you just want to ensure you aren't taking shallow breaths around the table. It's common to do this when your in a pressure situation. You need to make sure your getting enough oxygen to the brain, furthermore it just relaxes you.

skybaw
06-04-2011, 12:29 AM
Thanks for all the advice. Guess I was just thinking about it too much.

Falcon Eddie
06-04-2011, 06:22 AM
The sniper breathing technique for shooting a one shot kill is perfect for that skill. Shooting pool requires more a fluid series of movements. Breathing during the flow of from one shot to the next would be a different rhythm .
Also what you do ( breathing ) while sitting in the electric chair waiting to shoot is equally important.
If you were to try to breathe this way during every shot in a game you would be worn out by the end of the first match.

sfleinen
06-04-2011, 06:37 AM
The sniper breathing technique for shooting a one shot kill is perfect for that skill. Shooting pool requires more a fluid series of movements. Breathing during the flow of from one shot to the next would be a different rhythm .
Also what you do ( breathing ) while sitting in the electric chair waiting to shoot is equally important.
If you were to try to breathe this way during every shot in a game you would be worn out by the end of the first match.

Falcon Eddie:

Actually, this breathing technique (the sniper breathing technique) is also used in competitive rifle shooting, where it's not a "one shot" kill. (Rather, a series of shots -- every shot -- where you're going for the tightest grouping on the target. In match play, it's not uncommon to go through just as many shots as you would in a standard short-rack rotation game.) This breathing technique is also used in snooker, when, as a previous poster mentioned, the 4-point contact (http://youtube.com/watch?v=gSK4w_9S_x0) (bridge, chin, chest, grip-hand) necessitates that your chest be still when pulling the trigger on the shot.

While the expansion and contraction of the chest may be no big deal if you normally play high up over the cue (e.g. Minnesota Fats style), it is a [I]big deal if you normally play down low over the cue, especially with chest contact.

Just FYI,
-Sean

Falcon Eddie
06-04-2011, 01:42 PM
Falcon Eddie:

Actually, this breathing technique (the sniper breathing technique) is also used in competitive rifle shooting, where it's not a "one shot" kill. (Rather, a series of shots -- every shot -- where you're going for the tightest grouping on the target. In match play, it's not uncommon to go through just as many shots as you would in a standard short-rack rotation game.) This breathing technique is also used in snooker, when, as a previous poster mentioned, the 4-point contact (http://youtube.com/watch?v=gSK4w_9S_x0) (bridge, chin, chest, grip-hand) necessitates that your chest be still when pulling the trigger on the shot.

While the expansion and contraction of the chest may be no big deal if you normally play high up over the cue (e.g. Minnesota Fats style), it is a [I]big deal if you normally play down low over the cue, especially with chest contact.

Just FYI,
-Sean

Point well taken, I was really trying to empathize the different breathing for different skills. Those series of shots you describe in grouping are done rather quickly I think. The point of snooker players breathing would not be the same.
However during a must make shot..say the winning 9 ball , cue ball on the rail straight in 9 in the middle of the table type shot. I could see myself using a sniper style breathing method. Just not , for trying to be in the flow or zone of my natural ryhtym.

cesarmorales
06-05-2011, 10:28 PM
I used to shoot pistols and rifles competitively and there is a little difference in breathing between the two. Sniper/rifle work is all about lack of movement, the shooting jackets have you tied up so tight you can hardly breath anyway. Shooting with a handgun in combat shooting is about moving and shooting, and more like shooting pool, maybe shooting three shots at one target, then you may have to run a distance and you are going to be breathing hard but you do have to try to slow it down when taking shots.

When I play pool I breath lightly during the practice strokes and then hold my breath during exhale on the follow through, I really don't have to think about it anymore. But now as I get older it means I automatically gulp air after the shot and it leads to belching and farting, hehehe.

I also have noticed that when I am playing for cash or in a tournament and taking my time, I breath different than when I am playing fast and loose for fun.

duckie
06-06-2011, 07:45 AM
Just because the word aim is used in pool does not mean pool and shooting have anythin in common. Pool is more like a marital art than anything.

The breathing used in pool should be just like you do every day. You don't use any special breathing in washing the dishes, same applies in pool.

Read "The Book of the Five Rings" and you will understand.

edd
06-06-2011, 08:47 AM
Yes, I use breathing techniques when playing pool. I do this just prior to and during any match. I slowly inhale as much as I can possibly through my nose, I hold that breath for the same amount of time it takes to inhale, then exhale through my mouth at the same rate. Do it 5 or 6 times succesively. This method slows your pulse/heart rate and reoxygenates your blood. It will help you to remain calmer when you get back to the table if your lucky enough to. It's a very well known technique for athletes in many sports. I raced bicycles when I was younger and learned about how important breathing techniques are in sports.

Good overview. Yes, deep breathing is a key factor in relaxing the muscles and maintaining focus.

asbani
06-06-2011, 01:27 PM
yesterday i've seen this thread, and today while playing it suddenly hits me (This thread) and I started thinking about it, then while I'm shooting I was paying attention of my breathing, and guess what happens, I started missing every shot while thinking about it lol. it was funny, then i stopped thinking about and just started playing and I was playing much better... :P

Blue Hog ridr
06-06-2011, 02:14 PM
Personally, I like the breathing technique of when I inhale, and then exhale.
I try to do this 24/7. If you don't, things can get all grey and fuzzy, then you fall down.

But when I am down on a tough shot, I relax by breathing. I do my pre shot routine. I inhale and then a slow steady and gentle exhale. I try and time this with my back stroke so when I'm ready to pull the trigger, I have already exhaled and
am relaxed from doing that. I don't do it all the time, mostly when I am on a more difficult shot and I need the extra focus.

Spantiznik
06-06-2011, 02:36 PM
Does anybody use a breathing method when stroking the cue? Do you inhale when drawing the cue back and exhale on the forward stroke? Or do you hold your breath for the duration of the stroke?

Sky
Songtan Pool League, South Korea

Have you tried breathing when your Chalking your Cue ? :thumbup:
That way you don't have to worry about holding your breath for as long as you are at the table :p :D

Falcon Eddie
06-06-2011, 04:34 PM
Just because the word aim is used in pool does not mean pool and shooting have anythin in common. Pool is more like a marital art than anything.

The breathing used in pool should be just like you do every day. You don't use any special breathing in washing the dishes, same applies in pool.

Read "The Book of the Five Rings" and you will understand.

Great book. Gi gong ( breath work ) is moving meditation while deep abdominal breathing. Great for many things...my pool game for one.

daveb
06-06-2011, 05:01 PM
Ignore the people who disregard this notion. Create a rhythm where you inhale on the back swing and exhale on the foreswing and followthrough. Holding your breath creates muscle tension. In martial arts, tennis etc. You exhale on the execution of the stroke. Regulated breathing in the interim keeps your heart rate down and allows you to remain calm and focused. Bye.

daveb
06-06-2011, 05:10 PM
If you're a beginner or an intermediate this idea is relatively unimportant; but the more you advance, the more important these nuances and subtleties become an important part of your mechanics and ability to remain consistent under pressure..

Quesports
06-06-2011, 05:22 PM
The comments here regarding inhaling and exhaling during certain segments of the stroke got me to thinking. I have no idea if I am actually breathing at all while I am stroking the cue! I guess I'd better start before I pass out :o.
LOL! For me I just want my pulse rate to be as low as possible when I am shooting, especially a key shot, which is why I do deep breathing while waiting to shoot. I will try the inhale/exhale method during practice though because I am willing to try anything to improve...

duckie
06-06-2011, 10:58 PM
If you're a beginner or an intermediate this idea is relatively unimportant; but the more you advance, the more important these nuances and subtleties become an important part of your mechanics and ability to remain consistent under pressure..

I disagree. These are the most important when learning.

Moving a 19 oz cue may not sound like weight lifting, but it is. In weight lifting, you exhale when exerting the effert to move the weight. Same in land a punch or a kick.

Its hard for me to find one thing that is the most important thing to know about pool. To me,its all important. It's all about finding balance.