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View Full Version : Drop Everything~ I've Seen The Future!!


8-ball bernie
02-03-2006, 12:32 PM
kids tell your friends friends tell your kids, everyone tell everyone, go to www.internationalpooltour.com scroll down click on promo, and turn up the volume! this is what the future looks like, and i'm diggin it,man, i'm diggin it. and to ESPN i say to you take a flying f_ _ _ _ the word coming down from the ipt HQ's is this: they showed this promo around the world, and now just about every station wants it!!!! for once pool is in the driver's seat, and not the other way around.

Icon of Sin
02-03-2006, 12:36 PM
http://forums.azbilliards.com/showthread.php?t=25648

http://forums.azbilliards.com/showthread.php?t=25623

http://forums.azbilliards.com/showthread.php?t=25624

Needless to say, we are all very excited about this. The promo looks fantastic.

jsp
02-03-2006, 12:39 PM
..for once pool is in the driver's seat, and not the other way around.
Was the driver's seat ever in the pool? :p

Koop
02-03-2006, 12:44 PM
That is AWESOME.

Thanks for the link.

Billy_Bob
02-04-2006, 10:43 AM
Someone has been doing their homework!

Good.

Everybody has been screaming about how tournaments should pay more $$$...

Well this is it folks. This is the way to do it. i.e. Learn what the *masses* of TV viewers want, then give it to them. Then lots of TV viewers = lots of advertising $$. Then more prize money will follow.

Chris
02-04-2006, 01:30 PM
I was disappointed with the promo. It made pool look too much like professional wrestling, with all the trash talk. Or maybe it is the defunct XFL it resembled most closely. At any rate, it was definitely not short on cheese.

I for one hope that pool isn't turned into a prime time reality show. It will result in higher equipment and table time costs when the demand spikes. I'm not looking forward to the day when entry level Players cues cost $300, and table time starts at $20 an hour.

These are things that will happen when manufacturers and pool rooms have to pay big bucks for television advertising in order to compete for sales. Been there, done that (with a different sport).

Colin Colenso
02-04-2006, 01:58 PM
I was disappointed with the promo. It made pool look too much like professional wrestling, with all the trash talk. Or maybe it is the defunct XFL it resembled most closely. At any rate, it was definitely not short on cheese.

I for one hope that pool isn't turned into a prime time reality show. It will result in higher equipment and table time costs when the demand spikes. I'm not looking forward to the day when entry level Players cues cost $300, and table time starts at $20 an hour.

These are things that will happen when manufacturers and pool rooms have to pay big bucks for television advertising in order to compete for sales. Been there, done that (with a different sport).
Mass popularity leads to a larger supply, a greater range of products and services and generally speaking lower prices in the long term.

If the popularity of the sport does take off, there maybe an initial adjustment perios where demand outstrips supply and prices go up, but that will create profits and greater investment that will increase supply ans send prices down.

There may be too much cheese for your liking, but that cheese is pretty much free for you, and many are gonna eat it up.:D

Chris
02-04-2006, 02:53 PM
Mass popularity leads to a larger supply, a greater range of products and services and generally speaking lower prices in the long term.

If the popularity of the sport does take off, there maybe an initial adjustment perios where demand outstrips supply and prices go up, but that will create profits and greater investment that will increase supply ans send prices down.

Higher demand will lead to higher prices; higher prices will lead to more suppliers. A larger supply will then lower prices, but not back down to current levels.

One reason for this is the new suppliers are unwilling to produce equipment at today's profit margins. It doesn't justify their production costs. The higher market prices due to higher demand is what motivates them to produce equipment.

Another reason is that when television advertising is introduced into the equation, production costs increase. Even at the same profit margin, we can expect higher market prices than we are currently seeing.

You are correct that the initial price spike will not be permanent, but when the market adjusts to a new price equilibrium, the new price will still be higher than what we are paying today, except for low quality equipment typical of department stores.

:)

sixpack
02-04-2006, 03:44 PM
Higher demand will lead to higher prices; higher prices will lead to more suppliers. A larger supply will then lower prices, but not back down to current levels.

One reason for this is the new suppliers are unwilling to produce equipment at today's profit margins. It doesn't justify their production costs. The higher market prices due to higher demand is what motivates them to produce equipment.

Another reason is that when television advertising is introduced into the equation, production costs increase. Even at the same profit margin, we can expect higher market prices than we are currently seeing.

You are correct that the initial price spike will not be permanent, but when the market adjusts to a new price equilibrium, the new price will still be higher than what we are paying today, except for low quality equipment typical of department stores.

:)

Yes, but with all those pigeons with full pockets flocking to the pool rooms, we'll all be able to afford more :)

RC

Gregg
02-04-2006, 09:01 PM
I've seen the future too;

Search http://forums.azbilliards.com/images/misc/menu_open.gif

Colin Colenso
02-04-2006, 09:22 PM
Higher demand will lead to higher prices; higher prices will lead to more suppliers. A larger supply will then lower prices, but not back down to current levels.

One reason for this is the new suppliers are unwilling to produce equipment at today's profit margins. It doesn't justify their production costs. The higher market prices due to higher demand is what motivates them to produce equipment.

Another reason is that when television advertising is introduced into the equation, production costs increase. Even at the same profit margin, we can expect higher market prices than we are currently seeing.

You are correct that the initial price spike will not be permanent, but when the market adjusts to a new price equilibrium, the new price will still be higher than what we are paying today, except for low quality equipment typical of department stores.

:)
Well I have to disagree:

Since the industrial revolution, if we adjust for inflation, the cost of almost all products and commodities has decreased and decreased in proportion to their consumption.

What tends to happen also is that the quality of goods increases and greater investment is put into the various stages of production.

It's hard to use money as a measure, because even if money were stable (i.e. Government didn't keep printing the stuff as a hidden tax), the relative costs of goods would appear to remain the same. eg. 3 shirts would buy you 1 pair of boots.

But if you compare the price of goods to the average cost of labor required to afford them, almost all goods continue to reduce in price. eg. I gallon of gasoline in 1930 may have cost 30 minutes labor, and today it costs 15 minutes of labor. A low end car in 1950 cost 1000 hours, today a much better car costs 500 hours.

The best place on the net to learn all this is www.mises.org :D
Colin

Chris
02-04-2006, 09:57 PM
We can argue economics all day long, but this is not the proper forum for that, nor was that my intention. (Not that it wouldn't be enjoyable :) )

I've seen what happens when a fringe activity get semi-regular television coverage. It wasn't the average participant that won. The average participant saw his expenses skyrocket.

sjm
02-04-2006, 09:58 PM
It's hard to use money as a measure, because even if money were stable (i.e. Government didn't keep printing the stuff as a hidden tax)..........

Eureka, there's an economist among us and he's a monetarist, too! For those unfamiliar with the term, monetarists firmly believe that the long term inflation rate will equal the long-term growth rate in the money supply.

Colin Colenso
02-04-2006, 10:13 PM
Eureka, there's an economist among us and he's a monetarist, too! For those unfamiliar with the term, monetarists firmly believe that the long term inflation rate will equal the long-term growth rate in the money supply.

Oh no, don't lump me in with the Friedmonites or the Chicago School :eek: They're nearly as evil as the Keynesians, who are nearly as bad as the Marxists.

I'm moreso aligned with the Austrian School, but we would agree on the point of monetarism, being that the money supply determines inflation in the long term. Unlike those who typically call themselves monetarists, the Austrians would prefer to get rid of the federal reserve entirely and see a gold backed or free-market currency.

I know we are drifting off topic...can't help myself:p ...:D

DaveK
02-06-2006, 08:37 AM
Oh no, don't lump me in with the Friedmonites or the Chicago School :eek: They're nearly as evil as the Keynesians, who are nearly as bad as the Marxists.

I'm moreso aligned with the Austrian School, but we would agree on the point of monetarism, being that the money supply determines inflation in the long term. Unlike those who typically call themselves monetarists, the Austrians would prefer to get rid of the federal reserve entirely and see a gold backed or free-market currency.

I know we are drifting off topic...can't help myself:p ...:D

Neither can I ....

An Engineer, an Lawyer, and an Economist go for a job interview. During the interview each applicant is asked "What is 2 plus 2 ?". The Engineer responds "2 point 0". The Lawyer says "somewhere between 3 and 5". The Economist replies "what would you like it to be ?".

True story, a good friend of mine was applying for jobs all over Toronto as an Economist. His third interview with a major brokerage firm started well when he walked into the Head Economists office and commented on the large crystal ball sitting prominently on her desk. "That what you use for projections ?" .... "Yes".

Dave

Andrew Manning
02-06-2006, 09:10 AM
Neither can I ....

An Engineer, an Lawyer, and an Economist go for a job interview. During the interview each applicant is asked "What is 2 plus 2 ?". The Engineer responds "2 point 0". The Lawyer says "somewhere between 3 and 5". The Economist replies "what would you like it to be ?".

True story, a good friend of mine was applying for jobs all over Toronto as an Economist. His third interview with a major brokerage firm started well when he walked into the Head Economists office and commented on the large crystal ball sitting prominently on her desk. "That what you use for projections ?" .... "Yes".

Dave

As an engineer, I object to the fact that the engineer in your joke did the math wrong. Further more, he injected an order of false precision into his answer by stating it to two significant figures when both given values only contained one.

So Chris, to me it seems like the runaway popularity of poker over the last two or three years is a pretty good example of what Colin's saying. Compare the cost of a set pf 13g clay-composite poker chips now to the cost 5 or 6 years ago. It's wayyyy down, due to suppliers flooding the market with them when demand took off. There may have been a temporary spike (I don't know if there was or not), but in the long term, the suppliers keep supplying after the demand levels off, and prices go down. If pool really takes off, you'll see more pool rooms competing with each other, emphasizing the need for better-maintained equipment and lower costs, and you'll see more manufacturer competition as well.

-Andrew

Str8PoolMan
02-06-2006, 05:17 PM
A paraprased quote from Ross Perot during his presidential campaign, "I've never met a rich economist".

Str8PoolMan
02-06-2006, 05:19 PM
Note: paraprased = paraphrased. :o

Chris
02-06-2006, 05:55 PM
to me it seems like the runaway popularity of poker over the last two or three years is a pretty good example of what Colin's saying. Compare the cost of a set pf 13g clay-composite poker chips now to the cost 5 or 6 years ago. It's wayyyy down, due to suppliers flooding the market with them when demand took off.

Don't you think there is more to building a cue or pool table than there is to building a poker chip? It's not really a fair comparison.

JamisonNeu
02-06-2006, 06:23 PM
If more people play it means every tourney will grow in size which means more pay for winning I can't wait for that.