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View Full Version : Difference between custom and production cues


bznsharkie
02-09-2006, 10:48 AM
I have been browsing this forum for several days now and I noticed there is tons of talk about custom cues and custom cue makers. What makes a custom cue different from a production cue (Mcdermott, Predator, Fury etc.), do they shoot better? look better? feel better?

Andrew Manning
02-09-2006, 11:27 AM
I like your avatar.

Most people I think like them because they're custom. You specify what you want. If you like certain woods and inlay patterns, you ask for those, and in that way, a lot of people would say they look better because they look how you want them to look. Similarly with feel, you can get the weight you want, the joint you want, the taper you want, the diameters you want (grip, joint, tip), the ferrule you want, the wrap you want, the balance point you want, the weight distribution you want, etc. So in that sense, you could say they feel better because they feel the way you ask for them to feel.

As far as shooting better, I don't think I'll ever be convinced they do. I do think there's a placebo effect, though. If you think they hit better, and they feel better to you, that added confidence is probably going to help your shooting.

So there are quite a few advantages in having something made for you, instead of getting something that was made for anyone. But I don't know if they justify the added price and wait time.

-Andrew

TheBook
02-09-2006, 12:39 PM
I have been browsing this forum for several days now and I noticed there is tons of talk about custom cues and custom cue makers. What makes a custom cue different from a production cue (Mcdermott, Predator, Fury etc.), do they shoot better? look better? feel better?

All of the above plus.

I think most beginners start out with a production cue. They don't really know what they want or feel comfortable with and they can get one for a fairly low price. They are happy with the cue and feel it is a giant step up from a house cue. If they continue to play and really get serious and start to enjoy pool more they may want to get a cue that helps seperate them from the masses. At this point they have been around a lot of good players and if fortunate enough had a chance to try their cues. Sometimes they are content with their cue and other times they may decide they need something better to help step their game up a notch. A lot of times they are searching for that magic feather that will give them the ability to never miss a shot. After all when we miss it is never our fault and we have to blame it on something. So we buy a new cue.

If you use the search feature you will find this topic to be asked and discussed many times.

PoolSleuth
02-09-2006, 12:58 PM
What makes a custom cue different from a production cue (Mcdermott, Predator, Fury etc.), do they shoot better? look better? feel better?

Let me add a Few Words to your question. True Custom Cues is where you the Customers picks some or all of the following. IMO

Woods Used

Handle type

Point of Balance

Ferrel Type

Point Material

Point, or No Points

Inlays

Weight

Shaft Taper

Tips

etc., etc., etc.,

Kind of like the difference of when in need of a NEW Suit, going to Sears or K-Mart and buy or the Rack. Or going to a Real Tailor, and choosing Cloth Material, Color, lining, Pockets, Style, Buttons, Lining, Cuffs, or No Cuffs, etc., etc., etc. and getting a Suit Tailored to fit your Body.

Tbeaux
02-09-2006, 02:39 PM
Actually you have-
1.)Mass Production-all cues in line $30- $250 range,quality varies company to company and also from line to line.(Players,J&J,etc)

2.)Production: Cues are $100- $1500
A) Low end (pays the bills and salary),usable to pretty good depending on maker.
B) Mid level (profit), plays good to great depending on maker.
C) High end (few sold), plays same as mid level, better looking,more detailed(semi custom).
D) Production custom, few made,usually for pros,play great.

3.) Custom: $250 and up
A) Low end, the cuemakers basic designs, usually a couple on hand,equivalent to somewhere between mid and high level production.
B) Average custom, made to customer specs with cuemaker input, plays great, generally costs as much or more than the top high end production cues.
C) Skys the limit custom, works of art,may play great or not, collectors snatch them up fast so no real way to tell.:rolleyes: :p

Terry

Ali88
02-09-2006, 06:37 PM
I don't see the sense in paying over $1000 for a custom and then putting a Predator or some other kind of shaft on it. But I'm not into fancy cues so I guess that is why I feel this way. Also if I shoot with the same cue long enough I think that I would get used to the way it's balanced and learn to like it.

AuntyDan
02-09-2006, 06:59 PM
Another factor to bear in mind when comparing Custom to Production cues is something you will never actually see or feel in the end product - All the components that a custom cue maker has rejected or discarded along the way. Building a great cue out of an organic material like wood requires knowledge on how to select, treat and machine the wood to get it's best characteristics. Many Production cues are limited in their design and material possibilities by having to use large volumes of wood without being able to carefully hand-pick every single piece and they cannot afford high rejection rates or output volume will suffer.

Another way to look at it is to compare it to the market for custom motor-cycles, which is very popular right now in the USA. You can buy a perfectly good production motorcyle right off the shelf from a large manufacturer and it will drive just fine. Or you can order something custom made, and specificy in far more detail exactly how you want it to look and perform.

X Breaker
02-09-2006, 07:23 PM
For argument's sake, since each of them were built one at a time with different wood, balance and taper per the customers' requests, are you buying the cue more for its special one of a kind value than its performance?

Moreover, does that also mean if the customer does not really know what is best for him/her, that the cue may actually not perform as well as it should even with all the special tailored options?

May be it is because of the latter reason that some custom cue makers would refuse to do certain things on their cues for the customers?

On the other hand, if I only look at the performance of a cue, (without paying any attention to investment value or whether it is a one of a kind...and so on), I do not see any reason to believe that a custom cue would out perform a production cue.

Richard

Rod
02-09-2006, 09:33 PM
For argument's sake, since each of them were built one at a time with different wood, balance and taper per the customers' requests, are you buying the cue more for its special one of a kind value than its performance?

I think some people want to be special, rather what they play with needs to be outstanding. Its all a front.

Moreover, does that also mean if the customer does not really know what is best for him/her, that the cue may actually not perform as well as it should even with all the special tailored options?

I think the cue preforms well (maybe not great) in a players hands. From what I read on this forum (and others I'm sure) with all the buying/swapping etc. they have a small clue as to what they want.

May be it is because of the latter reason that some custom cue makers would refuse to do certain things on their cues for the customers?

Sure I know that always exists but in most cases why turn work away. Case in point many think a smaller shaft reduces squirt a ton or at least a little. I can believe new players go for that line but players with experience (that understand) it may, but get use to your equipment.

On the other hand, if I only look at the performance of a cue, (without paying any attention to investment value or whether it is a one of a kind...and so on), I do not see any reason to believe that a custom cue would out perform a production cue.

It won't. First of all all we hear this stuff, cue hits a ton, blah blah blah. It may to them but why are they selling it? Answer is obvious, don't you think? Second, a bunch of rookies hoping to buy a better game. Third, their buying into marketing, thats all plain and simple. If they believe, fine it may help but usually they hop onto the next band wagon.

Richard

Thats my opinion an I'm sticking to it.

flushman
02-09-2006, 09:48 PM
I don't see the sense in paying over $1000 for a custom and then putting a Predator or some other kind of shaft on it. But I'm not into fancy cues so I guess that is why I feel this way. Also if I shoot with the same cue long enough I think that I would get used to the way it's balanced and learn to like it.


Yeah that is pretty funny some one will come in with a new cue that cost $1500 and they put on a predator shaft or tiger or those mcdermott shafts. Why pay that much if you're just going to use a production shaft?