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TheProfessor
02-10-2006, 09:49 AM
Last night was my second session in the local league that I have joined. I was pretty pissed when it was all over, so here's my story. I would like to hear from others on here who are in leagues and who might have gone through a similar thing.

I feel like I am a good pool player. I can regularly break and run out on my home table, I feel like I can make almost any shot on the table if I want to. I have a nice, level 8 foot Connelly at home, covered with Simonis 860.

Then I go to play in league on these little 7 foot barboxes. Now I thought that practicing on an 8 foot would be awesome for playing on 7 foot tables, but so far I am wrong. The heavy cue ball makes position play difficult, the tables have varying cloth speeds, and I can't run out for the life of me. To add insult to injury, last night we played one of the worst teams in the league and I got beat 3 out of my 5 matches. Most of these people are bangers who don't play position at all, but when they missed the continued to leave me some awful shots. I would rarely get a chance to make a shot and get in good shape for the next one. It was very frustrating, and I ended up losing a couple of matches to players that I could easily take in a best of 10 matchup. Playing just one game against each player on the other team is frustrating, because all it takes is for them to have a great game and you to have crap leaves and they win. So I play the last match of the evening against a decent player, he misses and gives me no shot at all, and then he runs out next turn. This made the difference and we lose the session. Makes me feel like crap because my whole team is watching and I have just met these guys, and they probably think I am just banging the balls around, while the truth is that I broke and ran 3 eight-ball racks earlier that day on my home table.

I am just upset because I feel like I let down the team. The league is, of course, for fun, but the final placing of a team can be anywhere from a couple $100 to a $1000, so playing well does make a difference.

Purdman
02-10-2006, 10:03 AM
Hey baby, we all have our days. It is just a game. The most important thing is enjoying it. I played 3 games of 8 ball with my wife at home and ran out 2 out of 3 on her. I went to league and missed the 8 ball four times in a row. Go Figure man. Only difference is I won!
Purdman

ShootingArts
02-10-2006, 10:03 AM
You sound like you play little pool anywhere but on your home table. Without playing on many different tables you will have trouble adapting to conditions. Playing on larger tables only helps your small table play if you also practice on the small tables regularly too, that old adapt thing I mentioned earlier.

Sounds like the competition might have been a bit better than you thought too. Back when I gambled I was one of the "luckiest" shooters around.

Hu


Last night was my second session in the local league that I have joined. I was pretty pissed when it was all over, so here's my story. I would like to hear from others on here who are in leagues and who might have gone through a similar thing.

I feel like I am a good pool player. I can regularly break and run out on my home table, I feel like I can make almost any shot on the table if I want to. I have a nice, level 8 foot Connelly at home, covered with Simonis 860.

Then I go to play in league on these little 7 foot barboxes. Now I thought that practicing on an 8 foot would be awesome for playing on 7 foot tables, but so far I am wrong. The heavy cue ball makes position play difficult, the tables have varying cloth speeds, and I can't run out for the life of me. To add insult to injury, last night we played one of the worst teams in the league and I got beat 3 out of my 5 matches. Most of these people are bangers who don't play position at all, but when they missed the continued to leave me some awful shots. I would rarely get a chance to make a shot and get in good shape for the next one. It was very frustrating, and I ended up losing a couple of matches to players that I could easily take in a best of 10 matchup. Playing just one game against each player on the other team is frustrating, because all it takes is for them to have a great game and you to have crap leaves and they win. So I play the last match of the evening against a decent player, he misses and gives me no shot at all, and then he runs out next turn. This made the difference and we lose the session. Makes me feel like crap because my whole team is watching and I have just met these guys, and they probably think I am just banging the balls around, while the truth is that I broke and ran 3 eight-ball racks earlier that day on my home table.

I am just upset because I feel like I let down the team. The league is, of course, for fun, but the final placing of a team can be anywhere from a couple $100 to a $1000, so playing well does make a difference.

metal5d
02-10-2006, 10:03 AM
I also recently began playing in a similar league. I have always played primarily 9 ball on 9' tables so 8 ball on small tables is a big change. It can be frustrating playing on barboxes because each one plays differently, they are less likely to bo well maintained, and on 7' tables you get a lot more clusters or blocked holes. I am certainly one of the better players in our league but my fist couple weeks I was only winning about 50% of my matches. The past few weeks I have won 90% of my matches. I think the difference is I have been making better selections for which group is layed out better and playing more safeties. Keep with it and you will get better at the conditions you face in your league.

NineBallNut
02-10-2006, 10:04 AM
I find myself in the same position, however I normally practice on 9' tables. I find the transition to the barbox very difficult. Mainly the added cluster on the smaller table. But the barboxes bank different and the big cue ball takes a bit to get used to. I have started showing up an hour before our scheduled practice time to knock balls around and get a feel for the table. I have left many a night pissed at the world cause I played like hell in league. I even go as far as being in dead stroke during warmup, then totally botching things during the league.

ShaneT58
02-10-2006, 10:04 AM
I could be wrong but it sounds like you need to learn to play a smarter game instead of going for those tough shots you should play safe and force them to make the mistakes so you can run out. If you are playing people that aren't that good it just makes playing safeties easier. There aren't many games that I've lost and actually got to shoot that I've felt like I couldn't have won if I had done something different whether it be playing a safe instead of going for a shot, missing position, etc. Usually if they get lucky to win its because I gave them to opportunity.

BillYards
02-10-2006, 10:05 AM
Professor:

You are going to have to practice more on the barboxes. Remember that the game is a little different... But don't let the table and the big ball and the felt, etc. become a cop-out or excuse for you.

Here is my suggestion: take a new attitude when you go to play. Stop complaining about the table conditions! Never complain or cry around your teammates! Complaining is a sign of weakness. Just work hard at the table, realizing that you are going to have to overcome the table as well as your opponent... and thrive on that challenge. You are going to have to concentrate on using brains, brawn, safeties, and great pattern play to become a champ on the barbox. Also keep your eyes open... watch what is successful for other players...

Get together with your teammates or a tough opponent and spend some hours working together on the barbox... beating eachother down and talking about the game... working through it. It is just like riding a bike too... once you have the hang of it... you will always have it. You just gotta find the right mentality. Be tough with the table. Finesse oftentimes is not going to work.

Also: Carry yourself like a winner and you will be a winner. It will come to you and stick after a while....

And yes, I have some years of top-of-my-league experience backing my advice.

supergreenman
02-10-2006, 10:06 AM
Last night was my second session in the local league that I have joined. I was pretty pissed when it was all over, so here's my story. I would like to hear from others on here who are in leagues and who might have gone through a similar thing.

I feel like I am a good pool player. I can regularly break and run out on my home table, I feel like I can make almost any shot on the table if I want to. I have a nice, level 8 foot Connelly at home, covered with Simonis 860.

Then I go to play in league on these little 7 foot barboxes. Now I thought that practicing on an 8 foot would be awesome for playing on 7 foot tables, but so far I am wrong. The heavy cue ball makes position play difficult, the tables have varying cloth speeds, and I can't run out for the life of me. To add insult to injury, last night we played one of the worst teams in the league and I got beat 3 out of my 5 matches. Most of these people are bangers who don't play position at all, but when they missed the continued to leave me some awful shots. I would rarely get a chance to make a shot and get in good shape for the next one. It was very frustrating, and I ended up losing a couple of matches to players that I could easily take in a best of 10 matchup. Playing just one game against each player on the other team is frustrating, because all it takes is for them to have a great game and you to have crap leaves and they win. So I play the last match of the evening against a decent player, he misses and gives me no shot at all, and then he runs out next turn. This made the difference and we lose the session. Makes me feel like crap because my whole team is watching and I have just met these guys, and they probably think I am just banging the balls around, while the truth is that I broke and ran 3 eight-ball racks earlier that day on my home table.

I am just upset because I feel like I let down the team. The league is, of course, for fun, but the final placing of a team can be anywhere from a couple $100 to a $1000, so playing well does make a difference.

Once again somebody has proved it's easier to run out a 9foot than a barbox.

Cheer up prof. you'll get the roll on those little tables soon enough, my league plays on all sizes of tables depending on the room we play on that night, and I always have an easier time on the 9footers(that being said, the pub I play out of only has bar boxes so I'm proficient at them as well)

You also mentioned that this was only your second night playing in this league, is it possible you're suffering from performance anxiety? (Try Red Bull energy drink, it makes you more alert and focused in addition to giving you a feeling of well being)

It's important to get table time on all the different equipment you expect to be playing on in order to do your best.

Good Luck!!!!!

Barbara
02-10-2006, 10:08 AM
Join the crowd. I have a decent game on the 9 footers, but playing APA 9-ball on 7 and 8 footers is killing me! Plus, no push-out after my opponent leaves me hooked is just all wrong.

Barbara

Last night was my second session in the local league that I have joined. I was pretty pissed when it was all over, so here's my story. I would like to hear from others on here who are in leagues and who might have gone through a similar thing.

I feel like I am a good pool player. I can regularly break and run out on my home table, I feel like I can make almost any shot on the table if I want to. I have a nice, level 8 foot Connelly at home, covered with Simonis 860.

Then I go to play in league on these little 7 foot barboxes. Now I thought that practicing on an 8 foot would be awesome for playing on 7 foot tables, but so far I am wrong. The heavy cue ball makes position play difficult, the tables have varying cloth speeds, and I can't run out for the life of me. To add insult to injury, last night we played one of the worst teams in the league and I got beat 3 out of my 5 matches. Most of these people are bangers who don't play position at all, but when they missed the continued to leave me some awful shots. I would rarely get a chance to make a shot and get in good shape for the next one. It was very frustrating, and I ended up losing a couple of matches to players that I could easily take in a best of 10 matchup. Playing just one game against each player on the other team is frustrating, because all it takes is for them to have a great game and you to have crap leaves and they win. So I play the last match of the evening against a decent player, he misses and gives me no shot at all, and then he runs out next turn. This made the difference and we lose the session. Makes me feel like crap because my whole team is watching and I have just met these guys, and they probably think I am just banging the balls around, while the truth is that I broke and ran 3 eight-ball racks earlier that day on my home table.

I am just upset because I feel like I let down the team. The league is, of course, for fun, but the final placing of a team can be anywhere from a couple $100 to a $1000, so playing well does make a difference.

TheProfessor
02-10-2006, 10:12 AM
thanks for the advice so far. I don't complain to my teammates, I saved that for you all :) I guess the biggest frustration I have right now is playing with all of these new guys who are probably forming an opinion that I suck, when I really don't. I have a pretty good understanding of the game, I started playing when I was 3 and I just love the game.

I guess I should start playing on some barboxes, that is a good idea. I totally agree with the notion that the balls cluster more and you don't have a good chance to runout. Twice last night I made 3 balls on the break, but I couldn't run out during either of those games because of some clusters.

Barbara
02-10-2006, 10:21 AM
Professor:

You are going to have to practice more on the barboxes. Remember that the game is a little different... But don't let the table and the big ball and the felt, etc. become a cop-out or excuse for you.

Here is my suggestion: take a new attitude when you go to play. Stop complaining about the table conditions! Never complain or cry around your teammates! Complaining is a sign of weakness. Just work hard at the table, realizing that you are going to have to overcome the table as well as your opponent... and thrive on that challenge. You are going to have to concentrate on using brains, brawn, safeties, and great pattern play to become a champ on the barbox. Also keep your eyes open... watch what is successful for other players...

Get together with your teammates or a tough opponent and spend some hours working together on the barbox... beating eachother down and talking about the game... working through it. It is just like riding a bike too... once you have the hang of it... you will always have it. You just gotta find the right mentality. Be tough with the table. Finesse oftentimes is not going to work.

Also: Carry yourself like a winner and you will be a winner. It will come to you and stick after a while....

And yes, I have some years of top-of-my-league experience backing my advice.

This is really good advice, and I normally will not complain about table conditions because my opponent is playing on the same table, but some of the tables in my league are just plain awful!!

Barbara

Cornerman
02-10-2006, 10:26 AM
:) I guess the biggest frustration I have right now is playing with all of these new guys who are probably forming an opinion that I suck, when I really don't.

Do you think that you did anything wrong in those games, or are you saying they simply got lucky?

How many times did you let them get back at the table?

Did they run out well, or did they fall luckily on every ball? That is, are you sure you're not giving your opponents enough credit (as bar pool players)?

I think your desire to win and impress your new team might be clouding your thinking. Impressing your teammates shouldn't be a concern, although I completely understand the feeling. BTDT.

Bar tables are different. Expect them to be different. If you're truly a good player, you'll get used to them. But, it's not automatic. They're simply different.

Fred

ridingthenine21
02-10-2006, 10:44 AM
I posted on this last time, but I will post it again because I feel it is very good info for people trying to adjust to barboxes (I have learned this stuff the hard way as I was used to playing on 9 foot tables).
1. On a big table, let your stroke out, but on a barbox, have a little stroke, or the cueball will be all over the place. The cue ball is heavier, the table is smaller, so it doesn't take as much to move it around.
2. Try not to draw very much. The weight or the cue ball or something will cause you to miscue more often.
3. If you clear all your balls of the table and miss on the last ball or the eight, even a not-so-hot player can run out especially with the huge pockets and short shot length. If you don't have a good out, play defense and wait for ball in hand.
4. Use stun for breakout shots--the tangent line is pretty easy to visualize and it works very well, especially since bar tables tend to get very clustered and crowded. Also good to try and leave an easy ball to make in case you screw up the breakout. Nothing sucks worse than just barely missing the breakout that would win the game for you.

Ok that's all I can think of right now, but that is the stuff that really helped my game on the barbox. Don't feel bad, I went through the same thing. It's all about adjusting your game to the table, you can't move the cue ball around like you can on a big table. Trust me.

Cane
02-10-2006, 10:47 AM
Last night was my second session in the local league that I have joined. I was pretty pissed when it was all over, so here's my story.

Professor...

First, remember that you're playing single games against each opponent. That's nothing like playing a set against someone. In single games, anthing can happen and a D player might beat an A players brains out for ONE GAME. I don't know the format for your league, but if you have 3 players that night that have a little luck and get a few rolls, even if they're firing the CB 50 MPH at everything, then you're just going to lose, plain and simple. I've lost single games to players that I'd give the 5 and out in a long set... just nothing you can do about s#!t luck.

Second, you need to be able to adjust your speed control from table to table, cloth to cloth. Devise some method of measureing your speed besides "soft, medium, hard"... use a numbering system for how far the ball travels, like a Lag is a ONE or something like that, then adjust that numbered speed control to the table. It only takes a couple of shots before the session starts to get the speed control down, that way.

Third. Use different cue balls at home. I have 9 different cue balls. Aramith red logo, aramith green logo, red circle, blue circle, black circle, cheap magnetic, an old magnetic that feels like hitting a bowling ball, an oversized cue ball and an old ivory cue ball. Every one of them plays a little bit different... tangent lines change, natural roll lines change, everything changes ever so slightly. You have to get to know many kinds of cue balls to play top shelf pool.

Fourth, I got the same impression Hu did, that you play mostly at home. Get out and get on different kinds of tables. I have an 8' table with super tight pockets and 760 Simonis at home. If I strictly shot on that table, I'd be a phenom on THAT table, but I play on everything from junky bar boxes at our local tavern, to very nice Diamond Smart tables in Tulsa, to super tight 9' GC's that you can't cheat a pocket on. You have to make sure your game can be carried from one table to another, and you can't do that if you shoot 90% of your shots on your home table. Get out there, get on different tables under pressure situations.

Finally. Just have fun. That's the whole purpose of league! Have fun with it, relax, shoot your game and the balls will fall much more easily.

Later,
Bob

tbone1213
02-10-2006, 11:05 AM
I am just upset because I feel like I let down the team. The league is, of course, for fun, but the final placing of a team can be anywhere from a couple $100 to a $1000, so playing well does make a difference.

I always felt the same way regarding team play. There seems to be more pressure on you than playing singles. You need to remember that is a game and not work. Take some of the pressure off and enjoy the game.

cheesemouse
02-10-2006, 11:13 AM
THEPROFESSOR,
With only two nights of league under your belt I think you should cut yourself some slack. Someone mentioned preformance anxiety and we all feel that dread when we wish to do impress our teammates(old or new) but the pool gods just won't let it happen. It is hard to remain patient during those times. A good sign is that none of your fellow team members made comment one way or another about your play, they probably understand the situation. If they are an OK bunch of guys and have experience playing in leagues they will let you find your comfort zone. I don't know how you became a member of this team but most of the time one regular team member has recommend you because he knows your game is suitable and that you will make a good fit on the team. I would be interested to know how you became a member of the team. Where you asked or placed?
Adjusting to poor conditions on the barboxes is something you just have to deal with but there is something you can do as team that will give your team an advantage. Simply take the time to clean the table and balls on the table your match will be played on. Have your own little kit for doing the cleaning because we all know the bar is not going to have one handy, they don't care. I've been doing this for years, it only takes a few minutes to give your team this slight advantage. With clean balls and a relatively clean playing surface the balls will at the very least separate when gone into softly by another ball, this knowledge alone is an advantage to your team because you will trust going into clusters with the proper speed. It may be a small thing but over a season it may put your team in first place.
Not making excuses was a good move on your part. Your teammates should appreciate this as it shows your confidence in your game. You'll show your colors in time and all will be well. Good luck and have fun with your new team.

BillYards
02-10-2006, 11:32 AM
Prof: Just enjoy the competition... and the camaraderie... don't worry so much about what your teammates think right now. You will improve and show your stuff soon. And get Medieval on those clusters... move stuff around (only if you have to!) early in the game (when your opponents are less likely to take advantage if you have a problem) and let your shooting ability get you back into a nice pattern. Get mean and get out!

supergreenman
02-10-2006, 11:42 AM
Prof: Just enjoy the competition... and the camaraderie... don't worry so much about what your teammates think right now. You will improve and show your stuff soon. And get Medieval on those clusters... move stuff around (only if you have to!) early in the game (when your opponents are less likely to take advantage if you have a problem) and let your shooting ability get you back into a nice pattern. Get mean and get out!

Bill is %100 right here too, bar tables are meant to be brutalized. Take advantage of the fact that you can cheat a pocket halfway up a rail, that you can fit 2 balls in the mouth of the pocket, even the fact that the CB is heavier can go to your advantage if you know how to use it. If you haven't broken out your clusters by your 3rd ball you'd better be looking for a safety.

Koop
02-10-2006, 11:51 AM
Hi Professor,

Not sure if this has been mentioned but what I would do is, if they have weekly tournaments, try to play maybe one a week. This way you'll not only get better on the barboxes but at least if you are not doing well in the beginning you're only hurting your chances at cashing, and not the teams outcome for the night.

I've been doing this on 9' Diamonds and found that the Gold Crowns seem like buckets to me now. Not saying I run out everytime I should but my confidence level is very high.

Regards,
Koop

TheProfessor
02-10-2006, 12:39 PM
thanks again everyone. I was placed on this team...I am new in the area and I don't know a soul in the league, so every session I will meet new players. The leagues is ACS, so 5 players on one team play all 5 players on the other team; at the end of the night I will have played each of the 5 players on the other team. I am one of the only league newbies, so everyone else has been playing a while.

I will take the advice from this forum and move on with my game, practicing at home every night and trying to get to the barboxes as well. I did miss a couple of shots that I should have made, I am just not used to having to hit the cue ball so hard to play position. Of course, next week the tables could be fast as hell and I will have to change my speed again.

I joined the league to have fun and meet people, but I am competitive by nature so when I get beat I don't like it a whole lot :)

fish on
02-11-2006, 07:19 PM
If you can't get out you have to stop trying and tie things up ,make their life hell.Until the time is right. Its sometimes becomes a chess match.The way I was taught if you can't outshoot, them outsmart them.
You have to play with others better than you. It is harder to run out because smaller area same # of balls less room for them more clusters etc :D :D I've been to singles and doubles vegas apa .

ridewiththewind
02-11-2006, 08:35 PM
Hey baby, we all have our days. It is just a game. The most important thing is enjoying it. I played 3 games of 8 ball with my wife at home and ran out 2 out of 3 on her. I went to league and missed the 8 ball four times in a row. Go Figure man. Only difference is I won!
Purdman

Hey Purdman!

I here ya! Went out last week to our game room (shop), played the hubby for 8 hours! He kept pouring me straight shots....the more he poured, the better I shot. At first he was annoyed, then alittle pissy, but we were both laughing by the end.

I went out the next night for league, shot well in practice....couldn't buy a pocket during the match...go figure. Just gotta let it go, that's pool. BTW...no straight shots on league night, maybe that was the problem...Lol.

Lisa

blueballs
02-11-2006, 08:39 PM
ive never shot on a barbox that would fit 2 balls in the pocket openings.

there are many things that make barbox pool very challenging, and i dont mean equipment wise although banks will play differently. the side pockets dont have angled faces, and they arent larger than the corners like on a 7-8-9ft home table where they are much larger so you should play fewer shots at the sides. they will bank differently so if you are not familiar with its banking characteristics look for a good safety. the rails on a barbox are a little higher than any table ive ever seen, when you're shooting off a rail you can't shoot with a level cue, you will barely scave the CB. you do need to jack up a little for rail shots making them much tougher.

my advice is to play on tables other than your own. go to these pubs and play on as many barboxes as you can find. some have slow cloth, some have good cloth. some have the big CB "the mud ball", some have the aramith CB, some have a standard CB. always look for the aramith CB, they play way different, they get more action like what you are probably used to.

Cameron Smith
02-11-2006, 11:29 PM
with a smaller surface 7 footers will have more clusters. So my advice is to set up the balls in difficult scenarios (clusters and such) and try and run the rack. Don't break the balls just spread them across the table in difficult positions.

I don't know how you practice, but if it is just breaking and trying to run the racks, that is only productive for a while. If you are just waiting for good layouts than you only practice running open tables.

Take advantage of the fact that pool allows you to practice any scenario you can think of. The thing I really like about 8 ball is that it gives you the freedom to shoot positional trickshots. If you miss the position, who cares. As long as you had an insurance ball, its all good.

Hope this helps.

Cue Crazy
02-12-2006, 02:41 PM
with a smaller surface 7 footers will have more clusters. So my advice is to set up the balls in difficult scenarios (clusters and such) and try and run the rack. Don't break the balls just spread them across the table in difficult positions.

I don't know how you practice, but if it is just breaking and trying to run the racks, that is only productive for a while. If you are just waiting for good layouts than you only practice running open tables.

Take advantage of the fact that pool allows you to practice any scenario you can think of. The thing I really like about 8 ball is that it gives you the freedom to shoot positional trickshots. If you miss the position, who cares. As long as you had an insurance ball, its all good.

Hope this helps.


That is how I see it also, Anytime I have problem on the bar box, It's usually due to more conjestion on the table & smaller area to work with. Alot of times I'll force the run, get the breaks, then get hooked just enough to stop the run. This leaves even the weaker oponet an easy out. When you try to runout everytime, It's nice when you can string them together, and I have My share of those, but when It's just one of those nights when you clear your set for the most part, and that one ball gets you everytime, the table is left wide open with easy shots. I feel that the same thing can work against you when It comes to leaves, but aggree with the insurance ball on offense in 8 ,even so, I still actually have an easier time with 9 ball even though It's more of a positional game, because i don't have My oponets trash in my way. Sometimes If I'm having one of those nights, and know My oponets game, I'm guilty of playing the player, and putting Myself in position for the easy out, by letting him clear some trash. I'm not intentially sandbagging, just realizing My own limitations for that paticular night & hunkering down to stay alive. I play BCA now, so all that goes right out the window with the way the scoring works. It's actually benificial to try to make the run work everytime, so you don't get caught with all those points left on the table.

I think the point of practicing in public is a good one also, so as you are more comfortable with your surroundings when league night rolls around. There are always many distractions when playing out in public, especially the smaller places when they're packed out with people.

Also aggree that mindset is important, It does'nt matter what anyone else thinks, In your own mind you don't want to go in there thinking you might can win, You have to know it to be fact, and do what it takes, then as you start piling the wins up, Your confidense will grow as well, making you a stronger mental player when the pressure is on. I believe It's important to realize your limitations as well, because it can also help your confidense to know your game was off, and you still found a way to win. Basically find the positives, and try to focus mostly on them. I have this thing I do, that may seem kind of out there, but it helps Me, If I shoot a bad shot, and start feeling the hit from it mentally, I have a imaginary key that I put up to My head and turn, and I inturn shut that shot out of My memory bank. Sometimes It may not even be human error, and in fact be equipment related in some way, and can only hurt My game to keep It in My memory. I'm not saying not to learn from your mistakes, but rather that the shots that are more then likely not even your mistake you have to let go, because it serves no purpose not to, and the ones that baffle you as to what happened usually hurt My confidense & focus the most, because I become pre-occupied with figuring out what happened when i knew I did everything correctly. Sometimes it's as simple as a piece of chalk on the table or stuck to your tip, or possibly because you did'nt chalk before every shot, and miscued so slighty that It could not be heard or seen.

I think that overconfidense can hurt you also, so It's good to have someone rattle your nerves every once in while, It reminds you of how you got to the level of play you are at, and that your not always going to have that edge on everyone you play. Another thing also, once you start being a threat, you'll have people lay them out easy to you, but there will be others that will be instead gunning for you for the bragging rights, and play 2-3 times above their usual game. Thats one of the great things about it. I have been in and seen league games that would've looked like pro matches had you not known better. It's nice to have players to play that step up their level also, and force you to play better if not Your best. Some of My favorite games were against rivals that I went back and forth with. I'm talking about being respectfull of each other and their games, but rivals on the table, and matchups you actually look forward to.

GStrong
02-12-2006, 03:20 PM
One observation that has been touched on a little that I would like to point out is: Do not worry about what everyone is thinking about you!!! You are new, you want to show your game, you want to be accepted; all of this will lead to you being tense, nervous, anxious. Just try to relax, focus on your game, get those "voices" out of your head and just take it one ball at a time. Focus on an easy pre-shot routine. If you lose a game, figure out where you went wrong, then let it go. After reading a book called "The pleasures of small motions" (for which I have no affilliation) it really helped me to play my game without the constant chatter in my head, or beating myself up for a missed shot, and most of all, it helped with the fear of being judged by your peers. Take Care, Goodluck, have fun!

mnorwood
02-12-2006, 04:25 PM
The best single piece of advice I can give you is to play to win and not to impress. 8 ball outs are not always there. Winning a game of 8 ball may not include a dazzling run of 6 or more balls, most of the time you have to be more patient and play defense.

What frustrates me is when I play in a tournament on the box where defense is not allowed.

I to have a larger home table but I have been able to win box tournaments.

Hope this helps.

I rack balls
02-13-2006, 10:47 AM
I always show up a little early and roll the cueball across from diamond to diamond length ways to see how the table is rolling. Then check the rails, some rails you can see are screwed by getting even with the rail and looking down it. Sometimes you will run into a completely dead rail. Then of course check the cueball to see if it is magnetic, heavy, or big. If the cue ball is heavy use more top spin for position than back because the back spin is nearly impossible to control within a foot in my opinion (except for certain situations but still not easy in any reguards). Also when the ball is heavy then try to use as little throw as possible and keep your position as natural as possible. One time I knew a rail was dead and left my opponent an easy strait in bank and he hit it good but the rail was so dead he made it in the side instead of the corner hahaha. Little things like that will help you get a better winning percentage. Oh and another thing I would avoid is trying to play a safety by rolling the cue slowly at your ball if it is very close or partialy hidden by one that isnt yours, you will probably foul. The reason is almost all bar tables I have played on have a slight roll and very slow shots will either roll off or hit something on the table to mess you up. Only attemp to run out if you have a clear pocket for every ball or have a cluster you can break out within the first two shots. Hmmm and one more thing, dont underestimate anyone, I lost alot of games to lesser players because I think, "ill get another shot if i miss" and dont. Well I can't think of anything else to say at the moment but thats some stuff I figured out these last few seasons I have played in a bar box filled league, they help me in almost every match we have.

Bluey2King
02-13-2006, 12:01 PM
Professor;
I didn't see this in the other responses.
Are you allowed a time out? This would be a good to put it to use. It will help you build a relationship with your new team. They might have learned a few things about those tables too.

Cornerman
02-13-2006, 12:30 PM
Professor;
I didn't see this in the other responses.
Are you allowed a time out? This would be a good to put it to use. It will help you build a relationship with your new team. They might have learned a few things about those tables too.

Great idea.

Fred

TheProfessor
02-13-2006, 12:53 PM
thanks again for the tips and advice. i do indeed have a time out for each match, so maybe i will start using it to confer when i get stuck. i have been practicing with clusters on my home table, and i am going to try to play at the local pool hall every week so I can get used to the barboxes. the league rotates between several pool halls, there are "home" sessions and "away" sessions. This makes it pretty challenging because the tables change every single week.

frankncali
02-13-2006, 05:08 PM
thanks again for the tips and advice. i do indeed have a time out for each match, so maybe i will start using it to confer when i get stuck. i have been practicing with clusters on my home table, and i am going to try to play at the local pool hall every week so I can get used to the barboxes. the league rotates between several pool halls, there are "home" sessions and "away" sessions. This makes it pretty challenging because the tables change every single week.


Professor
Please dont take this the wrong way but maybe you should step back and take a good look at your game. You might have some parts overrated
due to playing alot by yourself at home.
Find out why you are losing. Make sure you are playing to win and not to impress your teammates. Winning is the ultimate goal not running
out a bunch or looking great shooting wild shots.

Alot of times league players on bar table simply try to run out to much or too early. I think learning to win a game or match can be as difficult if not harder than learning to shoot.
Have fun
frankncali

catscradle
02-14-2006, 04:39 AM
Last night was my second session in the local league that I have joined. I was pretty pissed when it was all over, ...

In some other post about a some other topic, somebody suggested reading the book "The Tao of Sports". I did and it helped my mental outlook enormously. It is a very easy read, I suggest reading it and enjoying the game itself a little more.

dooziexx
02-14-2006, 09:31 AM
Prof,
8 ball on a bar box is definitely alot harder that on a 8 or 9 footer... To many clusters to manage and you have to be perfect to run out.. I think alot of people here gave you good advice. You have to be alot more patient on a bar box. If your opponent leaves you no shot after he misses, then you should play a safety or find a way to really screw with him, like tying up his balls etc. do whatever you can to screw with him on the table until you get a ball in hand and run-out. If you play smart, most probably you'll come out of that game a winner.

The heavy cue ball on the other hand, just try to minimize using draw or spin. Use lots of follow and center ball to move the cb around. Theres also a good book out there thats the 8ball bible on barboxes..
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0974727377/qid=1139934868/sr=8-2/ref=sr_8_xs_ap_i2_xgl14/102-0759640-2968151?n=507846&s=books&v=glance