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ActionDan22
11-21-2012, 02:18 PM
May sound dumb to some but I really dont know what this means. I'm assuming its some kind of game you play alone. Help a brother out!!

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kwakaa
11-21-2012, 02:30 PM
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Pay Up Sucker
11-21-2012, 02:30 PM
the ghost is a monster player and never misses :grin: When you miss he runs you out 100% of the time!

jalapus logan
11-21-2012, 02:30 PM
This is as good an explanation as any:

Playing the Ghost (http://www.pooldawg.com/article/pooldawg-library/playing-the-ghost)

"Playing the Ghost" Practice Routine

Playing the "ghost" is a great way to keep solo practice interesting and competitive, and you can use it for 7-ball, 8-ball, 9-ball or 10-ball - and even the game of rotation, where you have a full rack and try to sink the balls in numerical order.

Here are the basic rules. You break the rack and then get "ball in hand" for your first shot, meaning that you can place the cue ball anywhere on the table. From there, your goal is to run the whole rack (or, as in 8-ball, the solids or stripes, plus the 8). You must win the game during this turn at the pool table. If you miss or scratch, it's considered a win for the "ghost," your imaginary opponent who automatically runs the table whenever he gets the chance. As far as the endpoint, you can play to a certain number of games (say, 10, for example, so the final score might be 8-2 or 6-4, etc.), or you can play until you or the ghost reaches a certain number of games (called a "race," as in "race to 7").

Professional players win games against the ghost in excess of 80 percent of the time, and a beginner will struggle to win 10 percent. If you are a beginner, your immediate goal with ball in hand should be to sink three balls every opportunity. You'll quickly get a feel for planning your cue ball position for the next shot.

Those are the basics, but you can add any number of wrinkles to the rules and scoring. For example, the basic rules do not take into consideration safety play, where you end up with a difficult or impossible shot on your next ball and you instead decide to execute a defensive shot. That's when you contact a legal object ball, and the cue ball rolls to a position where your opponent has no clear shot for his next turn. If you want to include safety play, there are several options. If your safety is successful, and the ghost has no clear shot for his turn, you can call it a draw and move onto the next game, or you can give yourself ball in hand again and continue your runout. (Typically, though, you would limit yourself to one safety per rack.) Or you could execute your safety, and then actually take the next shot for the ghost (and taking an honest whack at it). If you, as the ghost, sink the shot, you've lost the rack; if you make contact with the object ball but miss the shot, you change back to your original self and keep going, etc.

It's also up to you what to do if you scratch on the break shot. You can consider that a game loss, or you can spot the balls that went down on the break (i.e., put them on the marked spot where you usually place the 1 ball for a new rack) and start as you normally would with ball in hand.

Some players use a variation of playing the ghost in which they count the number of balls they sink in each inning, and then divide that total by the number of games played. So, if you're playing 10 games of 9-ball, and you sink balls 1 through 5 in every rack, you'll have sunk 50 balls total, for an average of 5.0 balls. You can use that number as a rating to keep track of your progress. You can use the same concept in 8-ball, where you'll be shooting for eight total balls (the solids or stripes, plus the 8), except you're not sinking the balls in numerical order.

ActionDan22
11-21-2012, 02:49 PM
Thanks alot, I kinda had an idea it was something like that. Now I know. As far as the first response, I haven't seen that since me and your mother did it a while back. Thanks for the memories! LOL

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Bob Jewett
11-21-2012, 04:07 PM
If you are not even close to beating the ghost here is how you can play his weaker brother, the "progressive ghost". Play it just like the ghost, but remove object balls after the break so the total ball count is, for example, 6. If you beat the "6-ball ghost" in a race to 11, for example, play the 7-ball ghost the next time. If you can't beat the 6-ball ghost, try the 5-ball ghost the next time.

If you get really good, you will be playing the 15-ball ghost.

Two comments on the long post above... I think only the top pros will do 80 percent against the ghost and not on the toughest tables. Also, if you're doing a ball-count score, count 2 for the 9 for a total of 10 per rack.

TSW
11-21-2012, 04:18 PM
It's also worth noting how strategy can make a difference in your success ratio when playing the ghost. For example:

1) Soft break, pattern racking, magic rack = easy Ghost.

2) Power break, no pattern racking, wooden triangle rack = hard Ghost.

The second approach is more similar to a real game, so it is useful even though your success rate will go down. If you're gambling, go with the first approach.

Johnnyt
11-21-2012, 04:44 PM
This is as good an explanation as any:

Playing the Ghost (http://www.pooldawg.com/article/pooldawg-library/playing-the-ghost)

"Playing the Ghost" Practice Routine

Playing the "ghost" is a great way to keep solo practice interesting and competitive, and you can use it for 7-ball, 8-ball, 9-ball or 10-ball - and even the game of rotation, where you have a full rack and try to sink the balls in numerical order.

Here are the basic rules. You break the rack and then get "ball in hand" for your first shot, meaning that you can place the cue ball anywhere on the table. From there, your goal is to run the whole rack (or, as in 8-ball, the solids or stripes, plus the 8). You must win the game during this turn at the pool table. If you miss or scratch, it's considered a win for the "ghost," your imaginary opponent who automatically runs the table whenever he gets the chance. As far as the endpoint, you can play to a certain number of games (say, 10, for example, so the final score might be 8-2 or 6-4, etc.), or you can play until you or the ghost reaches a certain number of games (called a "race," as in "race to 7").

Professional players win games against the ghost in excess of 80 percent of the time, and a beginner will struggle to win 10 percent. If you are a beginner, your immediate goal with ball in hand should be to sink three balls every opportunity. You'll quickly get a feel for planning your cue ball position for the next shot.

Those are the basics, but you can add any number of wrinkles to the rules and scoring. For example, the basic rules do not take into consideration safety play, where you end up with a difficult or impossible shot on your next ball and you instead decide to execute a defensive shot. That's when you contact a legal object ball, and the cue ball rolls to a position where your opponent has no clear shot for his next turn. If you want to include safety play, there are several options. If your safety is successful, and the ghost has no clear shot for his turn, you can call it a draw and move onto the next game, or you can give yourself ball in hand again and continue your runout. (Typically, though, you would limit yourself to one safety per rack.) Or you could execute your safety, and then actually take the next shot for the ghost (and taking an honest whack at it). If you, as the ghost, sink the shot, you've lost the rack; if you make contact with the object ball but miss the shot, you change back to your original self and keep going, etc.

It's also up to you what to do if you scratch on the break shot. You can consider that a game loss, or you can spot the balls that went down on the break (i.e., put them on the marked spot where you usually place the 1 ball for a new rack) and start as you normally would with ball in hand.

Some players use a variation of playing the ghost in which they count the number of balls they sink in each inning, and then divide that total by the number of games played. So, if you're playing 10 games of 9-ball, and you sink balls 1 through 5 in every rack, you'll have sunk 50 balls total, for an average of 5.0 balls. You can use that number as a rating to keep track of your progress. You can use the same concept in 8-ball, where you'll be shooting for eight total balls (the solids or stripes, plus the 8), except you're not sinking the balls in numerical order.

Very good info for the ghost. This could be a sticky for players that don't know the rules and such for the ghost. Johnnyt

LHP5
11-21-2012, 06:47 PM
I wanna punch that ghost straight in the face sometimes........

zencues.com
11-21-2012, 07:12 PM
Baby Ghost:

You simply randomly place the one through nine ball anywhere on the table but with no balls tied up or
in a tough spot on a rail. All balls should be “makeable”. You start with "ball in hand". Then you simply
have to run out the rack.

A made combination on the nine ball requires it to be spotted and play continues. Miss or foul and you lose.

Try this ten times and see how many racks you run. One out of ten makes you a 10% player.
Ten out of ten makes you a 100% player.



Mama Ghost:

Requires you to break the balls. Rack the balls in any order you choose. (1 on foot spot and 9 in the middle)
Placing the balls in whatever order you choose should give you a slight advantage after the break in the way
the balls lay.

After the break you have “ball in hand” anywhere on the table. A made legal combination on the nine ball
wins the game. Nine ball on the break wins. No made ball on the break is required.

Scratch on the break is a loss. After the break if you miss or foul and you lose.

Try this ten times and see how many racks you run.



Papa Ghost:

Requires you to break the balls. Rack the balls in a random order. (1 on foot spot and 9 in the middle)

After the break you have to play the cue ball wherever it lands on the table. A made legal combination on the
nine ball wins the game. Nine ball on the break wins. A made ball on the break is required.

Scratch on the break is a loss. After the break if you miss or foul and you lose.

Try this ten times. Ten out of ten makes you a monster.






.

Allen Derman
11-21-2012, 07:20 PM
i cant beat the ghost.

jalapus logan
11-21-2012, 07:49 PM
Stan Shuffet told me that short races against the ghost aren't all that meaningful. He recalled John Schmidt telling Landon that anything less than a race to 30 against the ghost didn't matter. He recommended races to 30, or "go to war" as he put it. So that's what I do when I play the ghost. Race to 30 at a minimum. It can be an endurance test for sure. Have to stay focused for a long period of time. It is an excellent way to get ready for match play.

elvicash
11-21-2012, 08:14 PM
He runs out, everytime. He is big hearted so you get ball in hand when you shoot. He plays real tough.

Redneck Jim
11-22-2012, 12:33 AM
He's the best player I've never seen .....