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View Full Version : Jump break cues-what makes one better than another?


lawful777
11-24-2012, 12:11 PM
Just realized I probably put this in the wrong forum even though I am looking to buy one too.

I know this has been talked about a lot recently but I would really like to know what sets break or jump break cues apart from each other. I am not crazy about the phenolic or WD tips as I believe the hit isn't as controlled. I like the Samsara cues but the price is quite high. There are a lot of custom cue makers making them in the 3-450.00 range but what I am wondering is what makes one better than another aside from the tip?

I currently have a vintage Viking jump break with a custom 14mm shaft and hard leather layered tip. It seems to work great for jumping but is lacking something on breaks. Could be partly my technique but I seem to be having some troubles with either getting a good CB squat but nothing falling or hitting harder, getting a couple balls in and having another ball hit the CB in, ie less control. I haven't used this cue in a while and recently bought the new shaft and like I said, something doesn't feel right with it.

So, if you were to buy a new jump break, what would it be and why? I am not so interested in the J&J/Players quality even though they hit good, as I like to keep my equipment around awhile and like a more custom cue. I would like to stay in the 3-400.00 range but am not sure what to look for. I am not in an area where trying out a good selection would be available either. Please PM me with any suggestions or options to buy. I would also be willing to sell mine if anyone is interested. Thank you.

MitchAlsup
11-24-2012, 12:34 PM
Realistically, the things that make a cue good for jumping are not the things that make a cue good fror breaking. The jump cue wants a light somewhat flexible shaft, while the breka cue wants a solid hitting shaft. Even if the tips are the same, the shafts just don't share that many characteristics.

On the other hand, good jump cues are in the $90 range and good break cues can be found in the $60 range--as long as you are not worried about woodworking details.