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Kickin' Chicken
11-25-2012, 07:09 AM
Let me start by saying that I'm not real keen on posting my personal biz as it relates to such matters, however, as the old saying goes, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

Please consider this a worthwhile headsup.

Tomorrow, I'll be having to get injections in my eyes to combat an inflammatory process (autoimmune) that I've been dealing with since acquiring a very bad case of Lyme disease over 15 years ago.

I had to get this procedure done once before in 2006 and while the med did its job, it turned into a mess with me having an allergic reaction which sent me to the hospital. This time they will be using a different medicine.

It is neither better or worse than a stick in the eye. It's exactly the same. :eek:

If it were a ride at Disneyworld, there'd finally be a short line - I guarantee it.

I've been trying to play around a black spot in the central vision of my good eye which I've actually managed to do fairly well. My other eye was messed up bad by this problem the first time around and so it's pretty much just along for the ride now at 20/90 with the center all blurred.

The reason I am bringing this up here, obviously, is for huge sympathy and money donations. :grin-square:

Actually, the real reason for posting about this is because the problems associated with this illness can, and oftentimes are, very severe. And it's entirely preventible.

The incidence of Lyme disease is endemic here in New England, and NY, NJ, Maryland, all down through the other Atlantic seaboard states, TX, OK, LA, AR, CA (especially northern Cal), the midwest, and MI (especially the upper penninsula). And, in less concentrations, it has and does occur in all of the rest of the lower 48. Add Canada, Mexico, and most countries in Europe and Asia have it, as well. Russia is particularly bad.

Be advised that the ticks that cause Lyme disease are on the move at any time of the year as long as the temperature is 32 degrees F or above. And at certain stages in their life-cycle, they can be as small as the period at the end of this sentence.

I won't start a novella but here's some important things to consider ( copied from lymedisease.org ):

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Reduce Your Chances Of A Tick Bite

Avoid tick-infested areas, such as leaf litter under trees. Avoid brushing against long grasses and brush on edges of paths. Donít sit on stumps or fallen logs.

Wear light-colored long pants and long sleeves so you can easily see any ticks.

Tuck shirt into pants and tuck pants into socks.

Use DEET on skin and treat clothing with spray containing permethrin.

Do a thorough tick check upon returning inside and for several days following exposure.

Check bedding for several days following exposure for ticks that drop off.

Ticks, especially nymphal ticks, are tiny. Find and remove them before they bite.

What To Do If You Are Bitten

Use fine-point tweezers or a special tick-removing tool. Grasp the tick as close to the skin as possible. If you donít have tweezers, protect your fingers with a tissue.

Pull the tick straight out with steady, even pressure. Click here to view a Tick's Mouth and why it is so important to pull out the tick correctly.

Avoid squeezing the tick, breaking it, or allowing any blood to remain on your skin.

Place the tick in a small plastic bag or vial with blades of grass, leaf, or moist (not wet) piece of tissue.

Label the bag with your name, date, site of bite and how long tick was attached.

Have the tick identified and tested by a lab, health department or veterinarian.

Wash your hands, disinfect the tweezers and bite site.

Educate yourself about tick-borne diseases and consult a doctor to see if treatment is warranted.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

If anyone has a question to do with Lyme disease, feel free to ask. Since getting Lyme disease, I've immersed myself in learning about it and have given talks on the subject at hospitals, chambers of commerce events and even garden clubs.

Stay the heck out of the high brush if possible. Hunters and hikers, take all of the precautions you can. You can still enjoy the outdoors and be safe while doing so.

Starting tomorrow, I need the 7 ball. :cool:

best,
brian kc

peterskw
11-25-2012, 07:17 AM
Brian,

Best of luck. My thoughts and prayers are with you!

KP

naji
11-25-2012, 07:20 AM
Let me start by saying that I'm not real keen on posting my personal biz as it relates to such matters, however, as the old saying goes, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

best,
brian kc

Thanks much, and i wish you full recovery, then i will take the 7!!

sfleinen
11-25-2012, 07:32 AM
Brian:

Thank you for posting this. I have a good friend, like you, that has the Tertiary phase of Lyme disease (it wasn't diagnosed until he'd had it for over a decade). It's with him for the rest of his life, causing complications with his eyes, back, joints, muscles, liver, kidneys, and even brain function.

And, all of my dogs have had the physical symptoms of Lyme disease -- crippled where they couldn't walk, needing shots of Doxycycline to combat the infection. They caught the disease, btw, even after they'd been treated with Frontline or Advantix -- which shows these products are not 100% effective. Two of my dogs are also positive for anaplasmosis (http://cdc.gov/anaplasmosis/) -- another tick-borne disease that can be lethal if the dog's (or human's) immune system doesn't kick-in in time.

You're right, in that all of these tick-borne diseases -- Lyme, Ehrlichiosis, Anaplasmosis, and EEE (http://cdc.gov/easternequineencephalitis/) -- are endemic here in the northeast. In fact, Lyme was first discovered (and named after the town) of Lyme, CT.

Pool-related, if you realize that you're suddenly having eye-focus problems, blurred vision, excessive "blank spots" in your field of vision, etc. -- you might want to have your doctor take a blood sample and check you for Lyme disease or Ehrlichiosis (http://cdc.gov/ehrlichiosis/).

Every year when I go for my physical, although I ask for it as standard part of my interview with my physician, they test me for Lyme and the other tick-borne diseases. I've been very lucky so far.

-Sean

jay helfert
11-25-2012, 07:33 AM
Kickin', Thanks for all this good information. Too bad you had to learn it the hard way. I feel for you buddy.

I've been asthmatic all my adult life, with severe allergies to things like the secretions from cats. I can be sitting on a chair (or couch) where a cat was earlier and within minutes my breathing becomes labored. I must get outside quickly and often need to use an inhaler to get my breath back. I had a full fledged asthma attack in 1994 that very nearly killed me. I was minutes from death. :sorry:

Sport666
11-25-2012, 07:38 AM
I hope everything turns out ok for you. Good luck

Neil
11-25-2012, 07:43 AM
I hope all works out well for you Brian.

erriep
11-25-2012, 07:47 AM
all my wishes , Brian . I've sent you a PM with uveitis-related contacts.

erriep , fighting for 12 years against an uveitis too.

bbb
11-25-2012, 07:47 AM
brian
hope all goes well
larry

elvicash
11-25-2012, 07:49 AM
Good luck buddy, I hope this works out well for you.

Mikjary
11-25-2012, 07:54 AM
I wish you the best of luck with your treatments. My nephew has suffered from Lyme's Disease for years. Any illness could be life threatening for him and very expensive to treat with his weakened immune system. He's a big boy. An All American college wrestler and a little tick took him down.

My son was bitten by two ticks this summer. We got him on an antibiotic immediately after seeing the trademark halo around each bite sight. He still suffered for a couple of months with unexplained sicknesses and fevers. I don't know if they were related, but he was pretty beat up.

With this new rise in Lyme's disease, why hasn't any attention been given to its increase in occurences? We spray for mosquitos, but is there something we can do about ticks? I understand the widespread nature and logistics involved, but do we have to have millions get sick before it becomes worth our time to do something about it? 249502

Best,
Mike

sk8ordie
11-25-2012, 07:57 AM
That is horrible. I have a great friend of mine who also got Lyme disease. She is only 30 years young and has had both hips replaced with her knees next to be replaced. She has chronic back issues and just received some really bad news. Although she has not told me how bad it is, she did tell me her spine is very bad shape and not looking good. This is a very serious disease from such a little insect with life long effects. I learned this when I grew up in Maryland. I wish you the best and I hope your eye situation gets better. Sorry you have to go through this.

steveinflorida
11-25-2012, 08:01 AM
My wishes for you to have a speedy and complete recovery.
Thank you for the 'Heads Up' concerning this.

Tramp Steamer
11-25-2012, 08:06 AM
Hang in there, Brian. Keep a good thought.
We have ticks in the Ozarks, but they don't seem to be the problem here as they are up in your part of the country.
The biggest problem here is cat thieves. They steal baby cats and sell them overseas to cat jugglers. Cat juggling, as you know, is illegal here in the States. :smile:

justadub
11-25-2012, 08:06 AM
Best of luck, KC...

Johnnyt
11-25-2012, 08:06 AM
I hope all goes well at the doctors and you have a speedy and complete recovery. Johnnyt

ENGLISH!
11-25-2012, 08:50 AM
I'm sincerely sorry to hear of your unfortunate situation & I wish you all the best.

I also thank you for your unselfish efforts to help others with this post as well as your other speaking engagements.

Good Luck with the treatment. A little Good Luck never hurts but you'll still be in my prayers as well.

Best Regards,

peteypooldude
11-25-2012, 09:47 AM
Thank you for bringing this to our attention, I hope you do well with your eye problems. Happy holidays to you and your family

skierlawyer
11-25-2012, 09:55 AM
I would have given you the 7 anyway :wink: I am terribly sorry that you are going through this. I'm glad we got to shoot some recently. I hope you get through it with as little suffering as possible. If there is anything I can do or help you with, please ask.
Brian

Maniac
11-25-2012, 09:59 AM
Hope all goes well for you, Brian.

If it does, you can change your screen-name from Kickin' Chicken to Lickin' Tickin'. :thumbup:

Seriously though, best of luck to you!!!

Maniac

JoeyA
11-25-2012, 10:07 AM
Thanks Brian!

My son does a little hunting and I am forwarding him your entire message.

I knew about Lyme disease but did not know how to increase your chances of not getting it, except to stay out of the woods. I deer hunted for a lot of years, layed on the ground (it was comfortable), slept on the ground (when I was too tired to stay awake), climbed trees, sat on logs (after checking for snakes)even picked up enormous amounts of leaves and dirt off of the forest floor to rub on my clothing to cover my scent. I guess I was lucky in that area.

I will be sure and pass this on to my son. I'll say a little prayer for you and hope you will be seeing things clearly, soon.

You're a good guy to share this and I am sure it will help someone down the road and thanks again.

JoeyA

pt109
11-25-2012, 10:30 AM
Best of luck, Brian.

regards
pt

Cue-Z
11-25-2012, 10:38 AM
Brian,
First let me say thank you for sharing all the info on Lyme Disease!
Second let me say I hope everything goes well with your treatment. I can only imagine how bad eye shots are...OUCH!!

Most wouldn't bother to talk and educate about the disease like you have. Kiddos to you sir!!
Take Care!!!

Nancy

RobertaAgnor
11-25-2012, 10:53 AM
Good luck, hope everything goes well!

Scott Lee
11-25-2012, 11:40 AM
Jay...I too have been asthmatic all my adult life, and used to use albuterol inhalers frequently. 8 years ago I switched to Advair, and have not had to use the emergency inhalers ever since. You might investigate this option with an asthma specialist. Sure works well for me.

Scott Lee
http://poolknowledge.com



I've been asthmatic all my adult life, with severe allergies to things like the secretions from cats. I can be sitting on a chair (or couch) where a cat was earlier and within minutes my breathing becomes labored. I must get outside quickly and often need to use an inhaler to get my breath back. I had a full fledged asthma attack in 1994 that very nearly killed me. I was minutes from death. :sorry:

Scott Lee
11-25-2012, 11:49 AM
Brian...You and I talked about this quite a bit when I came to your house. It's unbelievable that this disease can be so debilitating, and life-threatening, and that more is not known, nor anything done to try to eradicate it. You have my wishes and prayers that these injections will help. It's bad enough to have to suffer through the joint and muscle pain...but when it affects your vision too, well that's just terrible. Good luck my friend!

Scott Lee
http://poolknowledge.com

poolhustler
11-25-2012, 01:16 PM
Brian,

Is it true that Lyme disease is primarily an East Coast problem?

I was told long ago that the Western Fence Lizard here on the West Coast that the ticks feed off of kill the disease in the ticks??

I could Google it, but Im too lazy :)

Good luck with your treatment.

Russ

poolhustler
11-25-2012, 01:19 PM
Lyme disease

Studies have shown that Lyme disease is lower in areas where the lizards occur. When ticks carrying Lyme disease feed on these lizards' blood (which they commonly do, especially around their ears), a protein in their blood kills the bacterium that causes Lyme disease. The ticks' blood is therefore cleansed and no longer carries Lyme disease.[7]

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Lizards That Fight Lyme Disease

One of the most common lizards in California, the western fence lizard, helps to battle Lyme disease.

Hiking in the Sierras or strolling along a vacant lot, you will likely encounter one of these spiny, granite-colored lizards doing vigorous pushups. Males have iridescent blue throats and bellies and pushups flash the bright color to court females or defend their territories from encroaching males.

These showy lizards provide more benefits to humans than just entertainment. A protein in their blood kills the bacterium that causes Lyme disease.Western black-legged ticks (Ixodes scapularis) carry the bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, in their guts, which they can transfer to a human after biting and remaining attached for 24 to 48 hours. But a tick that sucks the blood of a fence lizard is cleansed of Borrelia, and its bite reduced to nothing more than a nuisance.

Western fence lizards (Sceloporus occidentalis), commonly known as "blue-bellies," occur in a wide variety of habitats throughout California except for extreme desert environments. They can be found from sea level up to 9,000 feet in areas of broken canopy with rocks, fallen logs, or other structures like old buildings and woodpiles

Kickin' Chicken
11-25-2012, 04:14 PM
Lyme disease

Studies have shown that Lyme disease is lower in areas where the lizards occur. When ticks carrying Lyme disease feed on these lizards' blood (which they commonly do, especially around their ears), a protein in their blood kills the bacterium that causes Lyme disease. The ticks' blood is therefore cleansed and no longer carries Lyme disease.[7]

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Lizards That Fight Lyme Disease

One of the most common lizards in California, the western fence lizard, helps to battle Lyme disease.

Hiking in the Sierras or strolling along a vacant lot, you will likely encounter one of these spiny, granite-colored lizards doing vigorous pushups. Males have iridescent blue throats and bellies and pushups flash the bright color to court females or defend their territories from encroaching males.

These showy lizards provide more benefits to humans than just entertainment. A protein in their blood kills the bacterium that causes Lyme disease.Western black-legged ticks (Ixodes scapularis) carry the bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, in their guts, which they can transfer to a human after biting and remaining attached for 24 to 48 hours. But a tick that sucks the blood of a fence lizard is cleansed of Borrelia, and its bite reduced to nothing more than a nuisance.

Western fence lizards (Sceloporus occidentalis), commonly known as "blue-bellies," occur in a wide variety of habitats throughout California except for extreme desert environments. They can be found from sea level up to 9,000 feet in areas of broken canopy with rocks, fallen logs, or other structures like old buildings and woodpiles

Hi Russ;

I have heard of these lizards that cleanse the blood within the ticks, however, the question I would have is whether or not the very next time a 'cleansed' tick bites a deer that has the bacteria in its blood, if the tick is once again infected and, therefore, once again poses a threat.

A sincere thanks to everyone who wished me well, I truly appreciate it.

I'm not really concerned over having the procedure done as it is a fairly routine one according to my doc. She said some days she does as many as ten of these - typically, it's performed on elderly patients with a certain kind of macular degeneration.

But while I'm not particularly concerned about it, it's still pretty crazy tht you have to sit still and *watch* as the tip of a syringe is getting closer and closer to your freakin' eyeball. :eek:

you can actually see the med swirling into your eye. I swear...

anybody wanna hit some balls with me instead? :embarrassed2:

best,
brian kc

Scott Lee
11-25-2012, 04:22 PM
Brian...Hell yes...please send your jet to pick me up! LMAO

Scott Lee
http://poolknowledge.com

anybody wanna hit some balls with me instead? :embarrassed2:

best,
brian kc

3RAILKICK
11-25-2012, 04:34 PM
Brian-

Good luck with the procedure. And better luck afterwards in feeling and being better for it.

take care of yourself

Sloppy Pockets
11-25-2012, 04:55 PM
It's unbelievable that this disease can be so debilitating, and life-threatening, and that more is not known, nor anything done to try to eradicate it.

Scott, plenty is known about Lyme, but little is being done about it. To get an idea of the extent of the cluster f*ck known as "Lyme research", read "Cure Unknown", by Pamela Weintraub. Pam is a professional science writer who lived in Westchester Co, NY. She and her entire family went through repeated attacks of Lyme while living there, getting and staying sick for years despite long-term treatments with mega doses of numerous antibiotics.

Pulling no punches, and using her professional contacts to gain access to info that is not being shared publicly, she went deep into the heart of the problem. It is a scary situation that keeps getting worse every year, with numerous players in the Lyme research medical community who have financial affiliations with drug and insurance companies, and personal career agendas that reek of conflict of interest.

Lyme is not just endemic to the Northeast. Huge areas of Minnesota and most of Wisconsin is just thick with Lyme, and the Sierra Nevadas in California and the Puget Sound area in Washington have it bad. The CDC has tracked over 400,000 cases since the first disease cluster appeared in Old Lyme almost forty years ago. By their own estimates, there may be 10-15 times that many that have gone undetected. That's 4-6 millions Lyme cases, most of them in the Northeast.

So, if the Northeast has about 50 million inhabitants, and 5 million have contracted Lyme, fully 10% of the population here may have contracted the disease, with 90% of these folks never getting treatment. Scary stuff.

Below is the latest CDC distribution map of known Lyme cases.


As a professional fishing guide, wilderness canoe tripper, and part-time chainsaw artist, I've spent a lot of time in places ticks love to go. I've suspected I had Lyme on at least three occasions, but the tests came back negative. Then last year I came down with a full blown case with all the classic symptoms.

Besides the bulls-eye rash, it attacked by nervous system, causing a severe atypical meningitis (fever of 105ļ) and damage to several cranial nerves. My face became completely paralyzed, by throat was almost paralyzed (making swallowing food a hazardous affair), damage was done to my hearing and my balance was completely disrupted. I actually walked in circles for weeks because of the severe vertigo. I completed several courses of doxycycline and other potent antibiotics, but 18 months later my neurologist can still detect gait disturbances and I almost fall over backward if I look directly up. At this point I assume the residual damage is permanent.

Thankfully, my eye doctor hasn't detected any eye damage due to Lyme, but recently the artificial lens that was put in after a severe eye injury has begun to slip. Because of that, I have double vision and bad blurriness in that eye. If the lens continues to slip, I will likely face blindness since my eye is already so compromised from injury they said they won't attempt another surgery.

Now I am wondering if the Lyme had something to do with this new problem. Any internal tissue degradation could cause the IOL to slip, so an autoimmune response inside the eye could be exacerbating this problem. I'm going to make an appointment to discuss this with my doctor ASAP. Maybe injections can halt this progression before it is too late and the lens slips irretrievable out of place.

berko
11-25-2012, 08:44 PM
Best wishes Brian.

On a brighter note, I'm sure you could still beat me with your eyes closed.

PaulieB
11-25-2012, 10:02 PM
I was an Animal Control Officer in MA and had to deal with deer hit by car and also troop through the woods to investigate other animals that were reported as rabid. At one point, I thought I was having a heart attack and was rushed to the hospital, where I stayed for 4 days.

As it turned out, I had Lyme Disease and had an interesting strain that was attacking my internal organs. This disease is crazy and can hit people in different ways. You generally hear about joint pain, but I had chest and gut pain, and as the OP said, he has eye issues. *edit* Forgot to mention, which I realized I should of put in after reading the other posts, I also had Bells Palsy, which is a complete paralyzation of one side of the face, which lasted for 4 weeks. Like I said, this disease is crazy, the test for it comes back with tons of negatives, and lots of people go completely untreated or mistreated.

Everyone, PLEASE be careful and take proper precautions any time you are out in a high grass/woodsy area. Strip down your clothes, change to shorts, and shake the worn clothes outside. Then give yourself a full inspection for anything that looks like a small black dot. These deer ticks are not anywhere near the size of a regular tick.

The department of agriculture is looking into ways to put up salt licks that have tick repellent in them, but keep in mind, deer are not the major carrying animal of deer ticks. Rodents carry more "deer" ticks than deer do, so salt licks are only a partial solution. I find that most solutions concentrate only on deer, which I find to be a weakness in solving the problem.

Regardless, be careful, inspect yourself if out in the woods, and don't leave anything in your yard that invites deer or rodents towards your house.

9BallKing
11-26-2012, 06:03 AM
Yeah I do a lot of hunting in maryland , as the season starts mid September Bow only the weather is still warm. Plus being in the woods earlier to start setting up game cams,corn, scout around etc. the area I live in has a ton of deer. We went in the woods and August and when walking out we stood in this guys driveway talking at the car. We happened to look down at our feet / legs and saw things moving. We were covered and by no exaggeration we had over 2-300 teeny tiny ticks on us. We freaked out! If you ever saw two men strip down to their boxers and drive home in them it was us that day. I had someone bring spray and a lighter we didn't know what to do. It was like an alien invasion.

After research I found out these were called seed ticks. They hang out in large numbers. It's ticks larve basically and can't bite you yet. All you do is take a good tape wrap it around your hand and start sticking them to it. Easy huh but if you didn't know this you will freak the F out lol

Good luck with your medical issues as ticks are horrible creatures . The perm spray for clothing works great and kills on contact , do not get it on or spray directly on the skin

JuicyGirl
11-26-2012, 07:32 AM
I'm so sorry. I will pray that everything goes well with your treatment. Lyme disease terrifies me, it just sounds like one of the most difficult things to deal with.
:hug:
Loren

sfleinen
11-26-2012, 08:10 AM
Yeah I do a lot of hunting in maryland , as the season starts mid September Bow only the weather is still warm. Plus being in the woods earlier to start setting up game cams,corn, scout around etc. the area I live in has a ton of deer. We went in the woods and August and when walking out we stood in this guys driveway talking at the car. We happened to look down at our feet / legs and saw things moving. We were covered and by no exaggeration we had over 2-300 teeny tiny ticks on us. We freaked out! If you ever saw two men strip down to their boxers and drive home in them it was us that day. I had someone bring spray and a lighter we didn't know what to do. It was like an alien invasion.

After research I found out these were called seed ticks. They hang out in large numbers. It's ticks larve basically and can't bite you yet. All you do is take a good tape wrap it around your hand and start sticking them to it. Easy huh but if you didn't know this you will freak the F out lol

Good luck with your medical issues as ticks are horrible creatures . The perm spray for clothing works great and kills on contact , do not get it on or spray directly on the skin

I'd be careful with this synopsis, 9BallKing. Those "seed ticks" (as you refer to them) are tick nymphs, and yes, they DO bite:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tick#Life_cycle_and_reproduction

There are certain species of ticks where the males do not feed on blood as much as the females (the females of virtually all blood-feeding insects and arachnids are the main culprits), but the males are still arachnids, and bite/feed nonetheless.

As can easily be seen in Sloppy Pocket's attached map above, it's the northeast U.S. that has, by far, the most occurrences of tick-borne diseases such as Lyme, Ehrlichiosis, Anaplasmosis, etc. And the unfortunate part of this is that most of these cases *are* transmitted by the tiniest of the ticks -- including nymphs -- because people just don't see them or catch them in time. (Large ticks, by comparison, you'll most likely see -- and feel crawling on your skin -- before they have a chance to attach and feed to engorgement. They feel like a "flappy" skin tag under your clothing.) Many times, those small ticks/nymphs will feed to engorgement, drop off, and you won't be the wiser that it happened, because even after engorgement, they are still smaller than the head of a pin.

While walking my dogs, I always try to stay away from brush, piles of leaves, etc., and I check myself thoroughly if I suspect I was in a tick-infested area. Sometimes, after playing with my dogs after a walk, I'll "feel" something crawling on my arm or the back of my leg, and sure enough, it's a large tick that was repelled by the Advantix treatment on my dogs, and is instead finding a place to attach on me. That's scary, because the smaller ticks and nymphs I won't feel. DEET is your best friend in these cases.

-Sean

Six Shooter
11-26-2012, 09:53 AM
Before I came up to the DC area from Georgia, I had went fishing at a friend's pond.

A couple of days later I discovered a slightly engorged tick on my hip. I pulled it off and sounded its death knell.

A few days later I had flu like symptoms but it wasn't fly season. I had to go the doctor anyway to discuss some of the medications I'm on anyway and thought I had better bring it to his attention.

He diagnosed me with Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. The most deadly of the tick borne diseases.

Within a couple of more days, the fever really started spiking up to 104.8. I could feel the stiffening in my neck and figured it may have been the meningitis starting to take its hold. I felt absolutely miserable.

The antibiotics did their job and I recovered. What I am not aware of is if there are any residual effects such as there are associated with Lyme disease.

The good note is that I won't be be able to contract Spotted Fever again but now that I'm in MD, I'm sure that the possibility of contracting Lyme is there.

I know it is not the same as Lyme but it is none he less something to be aware of at all times.

To those of you have had to deal with tick borne diseases, I am with you and feel for you.

Kickin' Chicken
11-27-2012, 07:28 PM
Well, despite a near mishap (the technician girl was just about to pretreat my eyeball with the exact same antibiotic drops that sent me to the ER in 2006 with hives, but lucky fo me, just as she was about to squeeze some in, I asked about it and she stopped and called a nurse in who checked into it and determined they were about to do some harm - wtf - I shoulda kept my mouth shut and I might have got a new car out of it. ha! Yeah, my luck I probably would have croaked.) Okay, this bracketed commentary is way too long, let me start the sentence over.

Well, despite the near mishap described above, I made it through the unpleasantness and today all I have is some soreness and some redeye. And, oh yeah, the beautiful memory.

The reason I ever got back into pool after an approx 20 year layoff was because of the ongoing effects Lyme disease had on me and I figured pool would help me to regain some of my hand-eye coordination and maybe even some spatial reasoning as I try to sort out patterns and defensive shots.

The vast majority of people I have known with chronic lyme disease have had less arthritic involvement and much more in the way of neurologic problems - central nervous system to be more precise. And this has been the case for me in addition to the autoimmunity.

I couldn't speak for months, I sat drooling like the village idiot. I couldn't go out in the daylight, I had to hang blankets over the windows to block out the light. I repeatedly became lost in my hometown. There were visual, auditory and ocilofactory halleucinations, cognitive impairment, encephalitis. For about two years straight, almost every single day I thought I was going to die. I had 5 spinal taps (anothe procedure that if it were a ride at Disney, I promise there'd be no wait to get on). :yikes:

I have been treated for the Lyme as an in-patient at three CT hospitals, Boston Medical Ctr, The Lahey Clinic, Texas A&M, Johns Hopkins, and the NIH in Bathesda, MD.

Suffice to say, this completely preventable illness can be a real game changer - or game ender. And it makes no difference at all how tough you are - this shit can bring you to your knees.

I had a good friend who was as tough as they come, a real man's man. He was a Connecticut lobsterman and when you gave him a smack on the back it was like you were hitting concrete. He contracted Lyme and was in so much physical pain he ended up shooting himself in the heart while leaving a note asking that his intact brain be used for research. RIP Kevin Smith!

Okay, that's more than enough gloom and doom.

Here is where I was gonna work in some responses to some of the comments in this thread but this post has gotten way too long and maybe even too NPR and etc., etc.

I may be a wee bit too passionate on this particular subject, as well.

Anywho, I'm worn out and may take another pass at this tomorrow.

Thank you all very much for your kind words and all. It was most appreciated, I assure you.

Oh, one last thing -

Tickborne diseases have been around for a v-e-r-y long time. One of my favorite quotes on the subject is just below. When did he write that? Did I read the dates correctly? :yes:

"Ill-favored ticks ...the foulest and nastiest creatures that be." - Pliny the Elder (23-79 A.D.)

On that note, keep safe and thanks for bearing with what I'm sure was a somewhat disjointed, maybe even approaching discombobulated post.

I'm pushing 'send' regardless. :sorry:

best,
brian kc

ENGLISH!
11-27-2012, 08:05 PM
Mr. Brian,

WOW, You just missed a scratch. That's why I'm very leary of the medical profession lately. Keep in mind they just 'practice' medecine.

I hope the treatment helps. I'll pray that it does.

Best Wishes,

Tramp Steamer
11-27-2012, 09:34 PM
Great news, Brian, my friend. I'm glad to see you're still tickin'...er, I mean kickin'. :smile:

pt109
11-27-2012, 09:42 PM
Hang in there, buddy.

regards
pt