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View Full Version : A Question for the Army, Navy, Marines or Air Force People on AZ


lstevedus
11-26-2012, 05:48 PM
There is a older male in my pool room who is 74 and says he is a Korean War vet. When I said my father in law was an Army Ranger who served in Viet Nam, who is very active in the DAV, he lost most of a leg to a land mine, the guy never talked about it again. I lost a cousin (kia) in the Vietnam war and find it highly offensive for someone to dishonor the men and women who served by lying about being in the service of our country. Was there any law broken? I can't say here what I think of this guy. I would probably get the ban hammer.

JAM
11-26-2012, 05:51 PM
There is a older male in my pool room who is 74 and says he is a Korean War vet. When I said my father in law was an Army Ranger who served in Viet Nam, who is very active in the DAV, he lost most of a leg to a land mine, the guy never talked about it again. I lost a cousin (kia) in the Vietnam war and find it highly offensive for someone to dishonor the men and women who served by lying about being in the service of our country. Was there any law broken? I can't say here what I think of this guy. I would probably get the ban hammer.

There is no law broken. I'm not sure why he would say he was in the Korean War at 74 years old. A relative of mine was in the Korean War, and he passed away last year at the age of 82. I think if this guy was 74, that is too young to be in the Korean War, as it did not last that long.

God bless the soldiers, sailors, marines, corpsmen, airmen, reserve, and guard.

OLD NO 9
11-26-2012, 06:01 PM
There is no law broken. I'm not sure why he would say he was in the Korean War at 74 years old. A relative of mine was in the Korean War, and he passed away last year at the age of 82. I think if this guy was 74, that is too young to be in the Korean War, as it did not last that long.

God bless the soldiers, sailors, marines, corpsmen, airmen, reserve, and guard.

JAM I find you to be right most of the time but on this you are wrong

ooops guess I was wrong just checked with my buddy that is 74 and he said he was stationed in S. Korea but after the war was formally over. but still tense.

lstevedus
11-26-2012, 06:05 PM
I thought the Korean War ended in 1953. This would make him 15 when the war ended. Please correct me if I am wrong.

J-Flo
11-26-2012, 06:15 PM
War ended July of 1953.

Unless he went in when he was 14 I dont think he is telling the truth.

measureman
11-26-2012, 06:16 PM
I thought the Korean War ended in 1953. This would make him 15 when the war ended. Please correct me if I am wrong.

Your math is sound.
Years ago I used to golf on a regular basis with a guy my friend would bring.
First time I met him he told me he served in the Marine Corps and I told him I did also.He never mentioned the Corps again.Normally I will call some one on this but I did not out of respect for my friend.
If you know anything about former Marines they like to share stories. The Marine Corps is small and there is always a chance that you had similar experiences at the same places.
There are always those that want the glory but did not earn it the hard way.

BobN
11-26-2012, 06:19 PM
The Korean War lasted from June 27, 1950 to January 31, 1955. Actually, the fighting ended on July 27th, 1953, but the US Military maintained an "official" presence until January 31st 1955. The war never actually "ended". There was a truce that has just never been broken by either side. No surrender, no terms, etc.

Regardless, if this gentleman was in the Korean war, he would had to have served on the tail end of the US Military presence due to the confict. If I am figuring right, he would have been born in 1938, making him 12 years old when the Korean war (or at least the US involvement in it) began, and 17 when it ended. Possible he was in the last year of the official military presence, as it was not unusual for 17 year olds, with parents permission, to join the US Armed Forces in that era.

As for those who lay claim to military service that weren't there... well, there are lower forms of life, but I don't know right off hand what they would be. Law Broken? Well, the only law I know of that concerns lying about military service is the Stolen Valor Act, which provides criminal prosecution for persons claiming, falsely, to have won a military decoration. This was an expansion on an existing law that made it illegal to wear or display military awards you did not receive. Unfortunately, it's only a federal "misdemeanor" to do such. In any case, claiming to have served in the military when you did not, is not a crime... claiming to have received a Purple Heart, DSC, CMH or any other military decoration that you did not IS a crime.

Unfortunately, POSERS run rampant. Those who served can usually spot them pretty easily.

Bob

just fyi: USAF Retired

david(tx)
11-26-2012, 06:36 PM
There is a older male in my pool room who is 74 and says he is a Korean War vet. When I said my father in law was an Army Ranger who served in Viet Nam, who is very active in the DAV, he lost most of a leg to a land mine, the guy never talked about it again. I lost a cousin (kia) in the Vietnam war and find it highly offensive for someone to dishonor the men and women who served by lying about being in the service of our country. Was there any law broken? I can't say here what I think of this guy. I would probably get the ban hammer.



http://www.businessinsider.com/its-again-totally-legal-to-lie-about-military-service-2012-6


http://roomfordebate.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/05/19/politicians-and-their-fake-war-stories/

emptypockets
11-26-2012, 06:37 PM
Hi Bob: Sadly, in June 2012 the Supreme Court voted in majority that the Stolen Valor Act was an unconstitutional law. Right now, it is NOT a crime to either claim military service or to claim receipt of a military decoration. However, in September 2012 new legislation was brought forth to introduce law that would make it crime if it was for benefit of the person making such claim (i.e., trying to get VA benies when never served). Regards, Dave (Just an FYI: USN retired - '78-00) :)
P. S. Thank you for your service.


The Korean War lasted from June 27, 1950 to January 31, 1955. Actually, the fighting ended on July 27th, 1953, but the US Military maintained an "official" presence until January 31st 1955. The war never actually "ended". There was a truce that has just never been broken by either side. No surrender, no terms, etc.

Regardless, if this gentleman was in the Korean war, he would had to have served on the tail end of the US Military presence due to the confict. If I am figuring right, he would have been born in 1938, making him 12 years old when the Korean war (or at least the US involvement in it) began, and 17 when it ended. Possible he was in the last year of the official military presence, as it was not unusual for 17 year olds, with parents permission, to join the US Armed Forces in that era.

As for those who lay claim to military service that weren't there... well, there are lower forms of life, but I don't know right off hand what they would be. Law Broken? Well, the only law I know of that concerns lying about military service is the Stolen Valor Act, which provides criminal prosecution for persons claiming, falsely, to have won a military decoration. This was an expansion on an existing law that made it illegal to wear or display military awards you did not receive. Unfortunately, it's only a federal "misdemeanor" to do such. In any case, claiming to have served in the military when you did not, is not a crime... claiming to have received a Purple Heart, DSC, CMH or any other military decoration that you did not IS a crime.

Unfortunately, POSERS run rampant. Those who served can usually spot them pretty easily.

Bob

just fyi: USAF Retired

measureman
11-26-2012, 06:40 PM
The Korean War lasted from June 27, 1950 to January 31, 1955. Actually, the fighting ended on July 27th, 1953, but the US Military maintained an "official" presence until January 31st 1955. The war never actually "ended". There was a truce that has just never been broken by either side. No surrender, no terms, etc.

Regardless, if this gentleman was in the Korean war, he would had to have served on the tail end of the US Military presence due to the confict. If I am figuring right, he would have been born in 1938, making him 12 years old when the Korean war (or at least the US involvement in it) began, and 17 when it ended. Possible he was in the last year of the official military presence, as it was not unusual for 17 year olds, with parents permission, to join the US Armed Forces in that era.

As for those who lay claim to military service that weren't there... well, there are lower forms of life, but I don't know right off hand what they would be. Law Broken? Well, the only law I know of that concerns lying about military service is the Stolen Valor Act, which provides criminal prosecution for persons claiming, falsely, to have won a military decoration. This was an expansion on an existing law that made it illegal to wear or display military awards you did not receive. Unfortunately, it's only a federal "misdemeanor" to do such. In any case, claiming to have served in the military when you did not, is not a crime... claiming to have received a Purple Heart, DSC, CMH or any other military decoration that you did not IS a crime.

Unfortunately, POSERS run rampant. Those who served can usually spot them pretty easily.

Bob

just fyi: USAF Retired

You are right. The Marine Corps does a lot of things that are not only traditional but unique to the corps.
If I play dumb and ask a few simple questions I can usually out an imposter unless he has studied the Corps very well. But there is some subtle "inside stuff" that you had to have served to know.

lstevedus
11-26-2012, 06:56 PM
I was a pall bearer at my cousin's funeral. He was awarded the Bronze Star and Purple Heart. I am having a hard time even writing about it. He was a good guy. I was only 17. I will never forget that funeral. God Bless All You Vets.

mortuarymike-nv
11-26-2012, 08:04 PM
I went in on my 17th birthday .
I had heard stories of guys joining when they were 14 and15 years old.

ww2 and korea even nam i heard there was some under age guys that manage to lie there way in the service.

my father was in korea.
If he is a vet it really doesnt make any difference to me .
its the ones that hi tailed it to canada that bother me.

MMike

JoeyA
11-26-2012, 09:51 PM
There is a older male in my pool room who is 74 and says he is a Korean War vet. When I said my father in law was an Army Ranger who served in Viet Nam, who is very active in the DAV, he lost most of a leg to a land mine, the guy never talked about it again. I lost a cousin (kia) in the Vietnam war and find it highly offensive for someone to dishonor the men and women who served by lying about being in the service of our country. Was there any law broken? I can't say here what I think of this guy. I would probably get the ban hammer.

I DESPISE anyone who lies about having served in combat and didn't.

That being said, could the guy in your pool room actually be a Korean War vet? Maybe...

Could the guy actually be older than 74, and possibly be a little vain so he says he is younger than he really is? He wouldn't be the only one to lie about his age. Men and women lie about their age. Some males have been known to lie about their age just so that they could enter military service.

I'm not sure if DD214's were around during and at the end of the Korean War but I still wouldn't lose any sleep over someone claiming to have been a Korean Vet, especially if I didn't know for sure that he wasn't.

Thanks for caring enough about those who did serve and especially those in combat.

I like the way the Navy Seals will out a poser. I've read a good story about how they sniff out the liars and expose them for the lying pieces of shite that they are. If a person claims that they are a Navy Seal and aren't, they face a bunch of truth-seeking Navy Seals that find it sport for exposing the liars. :eek:

We've got a guy who wears a Vietnam Veteran hat down here in New Orleans and I questioned him about it and to his credit he said he wears it to honor the Vietnam veterans, although I don't quite understand him wearing that particular hat.