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chuchu1604
05-10-2006, 03:16 PM
Hello all
Well... I'm not really a beginner :D but I'm pretty serious to improve my game so I want to find out a book which include all informations general of playing billiards : basic system of banking, aiming , strategy...... It's likely a book "must have" of a beginner.
Please tell me if you know a book like this.
Thanks so much!

jhendri2
05-10-2006, 03:44 PM
I think there are three books every palyer must have, Standard Book of Pool and Billiards (Robert Byrnes), Advanced Techiques for Pool And Billiards (Robert Byrnes), and 99 Critical Shots in Pool (Ray Martin).

Hope this helps!

Jim

NineBallNut
05-10-2006, 03:49 PM
The above three are good books, I have them all. Another couple I find usefull are "play you best pool" by Phil Capelle, and Precision Pool by Gerry Kanov and Share Stauch.

Cameron Smith
05-10-2006, 05:50 PM
I haven't seen to many good beginner books. Of course there are tons of books that cover your basic positional shots as well as advanced ones. But the problem is that I have seen only a couple of books that actually take an in depth look at the fundamentals.

That being said I haven't seen all the books, but I do know that Robert Byrnes just skims over the fundamentals, I don't know where Phil Capelle does though.

I find this very frusterating because when I was just learning 90% of my fundamentals were learned by watching pool on television and trial and error. It would be great of the "... For Dummies" franchise were to publish a pool book. I personally thought that Gary Mccords Golf For Dummies was a phenomenal beginners book, He spends most of the book looking at fundamentals which is what you need when starting out.

The closest thing to the For Dummies books, is Eva Mataya Lawrence's Idiots Guide to Pool. But the problem with that book I found that it didn't seem to realize that there are a variety of ways to go about playing pool. It was too strict I suppose. She at one point stated that a player must have their chin on the cue or almost on the cue, and according to her all players play like that, and the only time you see a player with their chin high off the cue is when they are posing for pictures. I know that this is not true as I have seen plenty of pros who playing in an up right stance.

I guess the point of this otherwise meaningless rant is that there are not very many good beginner books out there.

Bob Jewett
05-10-2006, 06:40 PM
I haven't seen to many good beginner books. Of course there are tons of books that cover your basic positional shots as well as advanced ones. But the problem is that I have seen only a couple of books that actually take an in depth look at the fundamentals.

...
Which fundamentals do you think aren't covered well enough by most books? Is there some particular way you would like to see them covered? Some fundamentals I can think of just off hand for beginners are:

Selecting a cue stick

Chalking

Making a bridge

Taking a solid stance

Gripping the cue

The stroke

A few suggestions on aiming

This gets them as far as occasionally putting a ball into the pocket. Is there something else that must be covered when starting out? It's a little hard from the perspective of having played for 40 years to catch all the details that novices need to know.

It's also hard to figure out how basic to make things. I've seen some players who were startled to learn that if the cue ball hits the object ball on the right side, the object ball will go the to the left and the cue ball to the right. Is this sort of thing worth pointing out explicitly?

Onemoreyouth
05-10-2006, 07:04 PM
please dont shoot me for this.... but i actually liked the black widows guide to killer pool. i picked it up more for the later part of the book(first half is basics, second is mental) but the thing i found in it that wasnt in other 'beginner' books i've read is a chapter on etiquette!!! i think thats a major thing for a beginner to know.

Room101
05-10-2006, 10:51 PM
I've been playing about six months now, and Capelle's Play Your Best Pool has been a great aid for me. I highly recommend it!
I just noticed that he has a new one coming out called Practicing Pool. You can view the Table of Contents and a "Sneak Peak" on his website. It looks like it will be very worthwhile. I am now eager to get my hands on it as soon as I have a little expendable income.

http://www.billiardspress.com/index.cfm

AZE
05-11-2006, 12:14 AM
I guess books can help, I've heard Chapelle's book (play your best pool), and 99 critical shots of pool (w/e) are some good reads.
If you're really serious about getting better - play alot, practice alot ALOT ALOT, watch good players play (in your pool hall, and videos of the pro's) alot, and gamble alot (bear down, take the nerves away).

DavidMNienow
05-11-2006, 04:20 AM
Having read and collected nearly all the major published instructional books over the 25 years that I have played, I have learned to love the Phil Capelle books. His books are the most the in-depth that I have seen for instruction and analysis. Start with his Play Your Best Pool. Then proceed to get his 8 ball & 9 ball books. If you play straight pool at all, you have no choice but to get his straight pool book as well. Now, if he would only put together a book on 1 pocket!!!

I would aslo strongly recommend the Pro Skills Drill books as well. Absolutely awesome material to practice from.

mikepage
05-11-2006, 04:38 AM
Hello all
Well... I'm not really a beginner :D but I'm pretty serious to improve my game so I want to find out a book which include all informations general of playing billiards : basic system of banking, aiming , strategy...... It's likely a book "must have" of a beginner.
Please tell me if you know a book like this.
Thanks so much!

99 Critical Shots is a good thing to go through after you're comfortable with the information from the fundamentals books. But you want to make sure you know enough to pick up the errors and misconceptions.

Capelle's books "Play your Best Pool," etc. are pretty good. But he is a little wordy.

The gold standard, imo, is Byrne's "New Standard Book of Pool and Billiards." Clear, tight prose. Easy to read and understand. And he knows what he's talking about. This is the place to start.

mike page
fargo

Gregg
05-11-2006, 06:13 AM
All books mentioned are great, but if you want to start at ground zero, with absolutely no information whatsoever, I can recommend this book, http://media.bestprices.com/content/isbn/71/1592572871.jpg

It covers a lot of things that are so basic that seasoned players would easily forget. I have it, it was my first book (I have a small library now, like most players) and I am better off for it. BTW, whatever positive things you hear about Phil Capelle, believe it!

Also, Bryne's "Standard Tape of Pool and Billiards Vol. 1" is outstanding, maybe the number one piece of material for a beginner.

chuchu1604
05-11-2006, 12:33 PM
Thanks to all for your kind helps !
As I said that I'm not really a beginner. So I think I'll pass the very fundamental book for a beginner. I'm planning to buy BYRNE'S STANDARD BOOK OF POOL AND BILLIARDS , 99 CRITICAL SHOTS.
Another question, does anyone know about the book " Banking with the Beard " ?
With me a book which introduce about the bank shot is really really helpful, I have very little knowledge of banking.
Thanks again.

9BallBust-O
05-11-2006, 12:37 PM
I agree with being down on the cue with the chin or very close - thats aiming , other wise your guessing, i believe

lewdo26
05-11-2006, 02:43 PM
I agree with being down on the cue with the chin or very close - thats aiming , other wise your guessing, i believeSo we should come to the conclusion that Dallas West or Mike Massey never aimed a shot.

TimFXF
05-11-2006, 03:07 PM
I really got a lot out of "The Illustrated Principles of Pool and Billiards" by Dave Alciatore aka Dr. Dave. It has the added benefit of being able to see him perform the shots on his website.

I also think that the Byrne volumes 1 & 2 (both the books and DVDs) are a must have. Lately I'm finding "Byrne's Complete Book of Pool Shots: 350 Moves Every Player Should Know" to be a good resource for more advanced stuff.

Samiel
05-11-2006, 03:16 PM
Byrne's "Standard Book of Pool and Billiards" is just that... the standard! :p

I personally don't recommend Ray Martin's "99 Critical Shots" and instead recommend Byrne's "350 Moves Every Player Should Know" which has more information.

Above all, practice and play... there's no substitute for experience!

Cameron Smith
05-11-2006, 04:57 PM
Which fundamentals do you think aren't covered well enough by most books? Is there some particular way you would like to see them covered? Some fundamentals I can think of just off hand for beginners are:

Selecting a cue stick

Chalking

Making a bridge

Taking a solid stance

Gripping the cue

The stroke

A few suggestions on aiming

This gets them as far as occasionally putting a ball into the pocket. Is there something else that must be covered when starting out? It's a little hard from the perspective of having played for 40 years to catch all the details that novices need to know.

It's also hard to figure out how basic to make things. I've seen some players who were startled to learn that if the cue ball hits the object ball on the right side, the object ball will go the to the left and the cue ball to the right. Is this sort of thing worth pointing out explicitly?

Basically I think that books tend to assume too much of their readers. Maybe it seems obvious that part of creating a stable bridge is ensuring that the base of your hand if firmly on the table, but not to everyone. I have seen too many players balancing their closed bridge on their fingers even when there is no obstruction to their hand.

The finer details are so important for a player who is just starting out, however I find they are often missing from instructional material. I don’t believe a book can possibly too in depth, because that simply leaves a reader without questions, which was the point of buying the book in the first place.

Everything you mention in terms of fundamentals is generally covered in most books, but the way I see it, is your list could potentially read like the chapters of a book. A chapter could be written on the stroke but it generally isn’t. Same thing could be said about the stance.

Another thing that is worth mentioning is that I have not seen many books that cover different styles of play. Many books are very dogmatic as far as their methods go, but if you go to the US Open there are a variety of styles that are fundamentally correct. Providing a few examples would make a beginners book more of a one stop read so to speak.

Finally I find that instructional materials rarely explain themselves. They place an idea on the table as a law that should be abided without question. However I believe a reader is more likely to remember an idea, if a logical explanation is given to justify why such and such an idea is so important.

An entire book can be written on the fundamentals of pool, and I feel one should be made available. I can’t see the logic of providing bare bones information on how to make a ball, and then give the reader a three rail positional shot to execute in the next chapter. Of course I am exaggerating but I would have paid any price for a book that describes the fundamentals of pool in great detail. An example of a pre shot routine would have been phenomenal, or a break down of how to make a proper stance while staying on the line of the shot would be helpful. A description of the various acceptable grips couldn’t hurt either. If you are going to mention that you should look at the object ball last, tell the reader why.

If you are planning on writing a book in the near future, remember every question your students have asked, every query put forth on this forum, no matter how small, obvious or silly it may be. To someone else it could be the missing link for his or her game. The frame of a building stands it up and gives it shape, but it is the small load bearing pieces that keep it from collapsing on it, the same idea applies to a players fundamentals. A reader should never be left with questions at the end of the book, and if they are, it should be because they only skimmed over the prose.

P.S. Ok maybe the bit about how the balls carom off each other may be a bit too general, but if you provide diagrams then that should clear things up without you having to explicitly tell the reader that.

P.P.S. If you want to discuss this with me further, feel free to ask, I can talk for hours about this subject, as I am still new enough that I remember sucking (more than I do now) very vividly. Ahh the memories of no one wanting me as a doubles partner are rushing back :D :D

Bob Jewett
05-11-2006, 06:03 PM
Basically I think that books tend to assume too much of their readers. Maybe it seems obvious that part of creating a stable bridge is ensuring that the base of your hand if firmly on the table, but not to everyone. I have seen too many players balancing their closed bridge on their fingers even when there is no obstruction to their hand. ...

Everything you mention in terms of fundamentals is generally covered in most books, but the way I see it, is your list could potentially read like the chapters of a book.
...
A main problem in instruction is to get the point across concisely. For a solid bridge, I learned from Mosconi. His book said very briefly, make your bridge like this picture. It hurt for a while, but then it stopped hurting. I now have Mosconi's bridge. He didn't have to say anything about the base of my hand. I also have Joe Davis's bridge for variety.

As for the one-size-fits-all and the my-way-or-the-highway styles of instruction, I think a lot of books have gotten beyond that, although there are still pockets of absolutism. The other extreme is "if it works for you, just do it," which seems to cause the learner to pile one flaw on top of another getting the various errors to cancel out. Such fumbling might work for a while, but I don't think it can be successful in the long run. I think fundamentals are important.

Cameron Smith
05-11-2006, 07:51 PM
A main problem in instruction is to get the point across concisely. For a solid bridge, I learned from Mosconi. His book said very briefly, make your bridge like this picture. It hurt for a while, but then it stopped hurting. I now have Mosconi's bridge. He didn't have to say anything about the base of my hand. I also have Joe Davis's bridge for variety.

The bridge was a bad example, I admit. But there are often small things that could be mentioned that would be helpful for the reader.

As for the one-size-fits-all and the my-way-or-the-highway styles of instruction, I think a lot of books have gotten beyond that, although there are still pockets of absolutism.

I admit that the availability of pool books in Canada, at least in Ottawa anyways, are fairly sparse. But it is from this that I have gained most of my experiance with instructional materials. I think it would be great though if a book discussed a few different methods of doing things, it would make the authors work far more valuable since the reader wouldn't need to go elsewhere (right away anyways)

The other extreme is "if it works for you, just do it," which seems to cause the learner to pile one flaw on top of another getting the various errors to cancel out. Such fumbling might work for a while, but I don't think it can be successful in the long run. I think fundamentals are important.

I agree with you here, and that is why I think the books should hold the readers hand to some degree, to make sure that they don't fall into those pit falls.

freddy the beard
05-12-2006, 02:52 AM
Thanks to all for your kind helps !
Another question, does anyone know about the book " Banking with the Beard " ?
With me a book which introduce about the bank shot is really really helpful, I have very little knowledge of banking.
Thanks again.

That book is available on this site for 29.95. Just go to the marketplace and put in an order. Do it now, I need the money.

Freddy the Beard Bentivegna

Ilove2playpool
05-12-2006, 07:59 AM
I've purchased quite a few books and videos along my pool journey, but I just have to share these two books with the group. Both of these books (in my opinion) are a must have. Particularly for beginners or intermidate level players like myself. They may also be good for the more experienced players and APA Super-7's, but since I've never been one, I just can't say. Anyway, if you're looking for something to help kick start your game, consider buying (BOTH) of these books.

Banking with the Beard
by Fred Bentivegna
www.bankingwiththebeard.com (www.bankingwiththebeard.com)

Format: Paperback - | April 2005 | ISBN: 0976622815

-AND-

The Eight Ball Bible: A Guide to Bar Table Play (but also works for the 9 foot tables too)
Author: R. Givens
ISBN: 0974727377
Publisher: Eight Ball Press - 31 July, 2004
Format: Paperback

I got then both off of eBay, but you can use also use this ISBN search engine to locate them.:

http://www.bookfinder4u.com/isbn_search.html (http://www.bookfinder4u.com/isbn_search.html)

So if anyone purchases any of these, let me (and the rest of the group) know what you think. I really feel the combination of these two books has clarified a lot of things I was doing wrong and/or just didn't know.

Ed C.