PDA

View Full Version : Taking it to the next level.


czarofrockland
05-17-2006, 08:45 AM
I am a C+ player capable of playing like a B. I feel that I have been at the same speed for a few months and looking to get better. Any suggestions?

degenrat
05-17-2006, 09:09 AM
take lessons, play better playing better players. maybe throw some money on the line.

Andrew Manning
05-17-2006, 09:25 AM
take lessons, play better playing better players. maybe throw some money on the line.

Right on. If you don't want to lose money gambling (I have very little tolerance for losing money; it just makes me feel really bad), at least make sure you play in some context where winning matters enough that you get nervous. The pressure will make you learn how to focus and shoot like it really matters. And play better players is key. You can have fun playing people not as good as you, but your game won't improve much.

-Andrew

degenrat
05-17-2006, 09:35 AM
Andrew, when i say play for money, i meant play for something. I do not have a ton of gamble in me, but i will play for $5, $10, or table time.

I think having something, anything on the line helps. and playign better players.

wannaplaySOME?
05-17-2006, 12:51 PM
I am a C+ player capable of playing like a B. I feel that I have been at the same speed for a few months and looking to get better. Any suggestions?

You should stop playing.



**lemme explain, take a break from the game for at least 2 weeks, come back to it and revisit it... when you take a break you become increasingly aware of how you shoot because you haven't done it in so long... MOST will also come out a speed better, but know that you have to take 1 step back to go 2 forward...

FYI - I think you are a good b player, not a c+... your underestimating yourself... c+ players don't gamble at the main table in the pit at valley forge!

Harvywallbanger
05-17-2006, 01:46 PM
I've said it before and I'll say it again. Shoot long straight in shots and spot shots untill the cows come home. Then block the pocket with an object ball a little and shoot them again. Keep repeating this untill theres barely any room for the ball to go in. A while back this took my c+ game to a good B player. Everytime I feel I'm at a standstill I go back to this and my game jumps. I feel now that when I hit a gear I play at A speed and I would give this drill 90% of the credit no bullshit. I have so much confidence that this drill, as simple and basic as it sounds, is about all I need to practice untill I have deadly precision. Then I will move on. Don't believe me? Pop off about 100 of them before you play next time and see what it does for you.


...as far as speed and position play I just pay alot of attention when I'm playing someone and use that time to hone in on those skills. But everyone is different. If your position play is what is holding you back then I guess you would need to work on that as well.

czarofrockland
05-18-2006, 07:35 AM
You should stop playing.



**lemme explain, take a break from the game for at least 2 weeks, come back to it and revisit it... when you take a break you become increasingly aware of how you shoot because you haven't done it in so long... MOST will also come out a speed better, but know that you have to take 1 step back to go 2 forward...

FYI - I think you are a good b player, not a c+... your underestimating yourself... c+ players don't gamble at the main table in the pit at valley forge!

Ha ha hows it goin? Just fel like I have been at the same speed for awhile thats all. I think you can vouch for me when I say that playing for something is'nt the problem.

Bob Jewett
05-18-2006, 10:41 AM
I am a C+ player capable of playing like a B. I feel that I have been at the same speed for a few months and looking to get better. Any suggestions?
Yes. You have at least three flaws in your fundamentals that you need to fix. There are essentially NO C players who don't have such problems. Figure out what your major flaws are and fix them. You may need an instructor to help with this, but if you are observant -- most people aren't, really -- you could video tape yourself and find the flaws on your own.

Good luck.

Billy_Bob
05-19-2006, 09:32 AM
At first the thing which helped me the most was "learning all you can". Practicing shots from the book 99 critical shots for one. Learning what shots are possible, what shots are not possible. Can you cut a ball or not? Etc.

And then practing the shots I had trouble with. Remembering shots I missed which cost me a match in a tournament, then going home and practicing that shot. I had a lot of trouble with draw shots and spent two months on these alone [for example].

Next I watched Dr. Dave's DVD and learned the 30 and 90 degree rules. This was magic. I almost instantly stopped scratching. And after about a year of knowing this, was able to leave position for my next shots many times.

Then the last thing I have done which has really helped me a lot is to only play the best players I can find. Only play in the more difficult local tournaments. And to not play lesser skilled players - not play in easy to win local tournaments.

And I have received a lot of flack about this. They ask why I don't play in such and so tournament. They say I could easily win, so why don't I play in the tournament? I say because it is an easy win, it is no challenge. Then they say if they could win, they would play every week!

The tournaments I play in now, I'm lucky to win one match sometimes. If I miss one shot, I get punished! They run out on me. So I'm learning to not miss. In the easy to win tournaments, they might give me 6 or 7 chances to run out. This drags my game down. I begin to expect the other player to give me many chances to win. So best not to play these players for me at this time.

I think in general it is best to play players who are a little better than yourself, but not vastly better. If someone is just learning to pocket balls for example, they don't get any shooting practice playing a run out player. So better to play someone lesser skilled than that.

pharaoh68
05-19-2006, 11:10 AM
I am a C+ player capable of playing like a B. I feel that I have been at the same speed for a few months and looking to get better. Any suggestions?

Maybe you should quit the game and stop whining because you're never going to get any better than you are. You're going nowhere fast. You're a loser and a choke artist. You're terrible. And for some reason, you think we all care enough about you to keep reading this garbage!!! :D

Go away!! :D

...oh, and since I'm backing you, make sure you beat the Russian tonight! (And kiss that C+ rating goodbye 'cause I'm showing this post to Todd and Bill!)

Jude Rosenstock
05-19-2006, 11:32 AM
I am a C+ player capable of playing like a B. I feel that I have been at the same speed for a few months and looking to get better. Any suggestions?


I've seen a lot of very interesting responses here. I can't say I agree with all of them but they all are well-intended. It is important to see better play and it's important to get feedback from a better player. However, the key phrase you need to keep in-mind throughout your quest is "being deliberate". Better players are deliberate. They're deliberate on their breaks, their kicks, their shot-selection, their speed-selection... In sum, everything you do, good or bad needs to be intended. You need to challenge yourself on every shot.

If you're kicking, you want to make contact with a particular side of the ball. If you're drawing, you want to draw a specific distance. If you're positioning, you want to gain a specific angle. Don't be vague about anything. The more you push yourself to gain exactly what is needed to run-out, the more you will run-out.

Although mechanical flaws may be your culprit, I find MANY players will intuitively correct these mechanical flaws the moment they make a mental commitment to tightening up their cue-ball and maintaining a confident attitude.

DaveK
05-19-2006, 12:00 PM
I've seen a lot of very interesting responses here. I can't say I agree with all of them but they all are well-intended. It is important to see better play and it's important to get feedback from a better player. However, the key phrase you need to keep in-mind throughout your quest is "being deliberate". Better players are deliberate. They're deliberate on their breaks, their kicks, their shot-selection, their speed-selection... In sum, everything you do, good or bad needs to be intended. You need to challenge yourself on every shot.

If you're kicking, you want to make contact with a particular side of the ball. If you're drawing, you want to draw a specific distance. If you're positioning, you want to gain a specific angle. Don't be vague about anything. The more you push yourself to gain exactly what is needed to run-out, the more you will run-out.

Although mechanical flaws may be your culprit, I find MANY players will intuitively correct these mechanical flaws the moment they make a mental commitment to tightening up their cue-ball and maintaining a confident attitude.

Well said Jude. While I am not anywhere near an A player (yet), I find that when I try for 'exact' position rather than 'area' position the results are typically better. When I shoot to a 'somewhere over there' position I can miss position by a mile (typically a good angle but way too hard or way too soft). When you shoot something very specific I think you end up trying harder. jme

Dave

Jimbojim
05-19-2006, 07:11 PM
what do you mean by "same speed"?

Cameron Smith
05-19-2006, 09:18 PM
I have this secret medicine that turns anybody into a pro! It may look like Desani water, but its not!!!! I'll send it to you for $100 000.

:D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D