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3andstop
09-09-2013, 08:17 AM
I talked about this when I first put it together about 4 years or so ago, I thought it might be of interest to some of you who would rather not do tip replacements completely by hand.

This setup was inexpensive, and with a little modification with some stuff from home depot and a little buzz box welder, that if you don't have, one of your buddies probably does, makes an acceptable rig to do tips, shaft tapering, I even made a tenon and replaced a ferrule with this thing.

Anyway it starts with this device I found on EBAY. I have no affiliation with these people, I just think buying something like this gives you a big headstart to a homemade device. This is the piece I bought a while back. (http://www.ebay.com/itm/PORTABLE-DRILL-LATHE-for-POOL-CUE-REPAIR-TIP-SHAFT-TOOL-Includes-How-to-manual-/111159854908?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item19e1a4c73c)

Here are some photos. Basically its three pieces of hardwood sold at HomeDepot. 1 base and 2 other strips.

Then 4 lengths of bar steel and a few wood bolts. This all provides a base for the lathe parts to slide on.

Next I bought a tall nut and a bolt. I welded a piece of angle iron to it that makes a rest for a wood chisel I use to flush up the tip. I welded that to a small rectangular frame I made from the remaining piece of angle iron.

Flat washers guide the movement along the bar steel nicely.

For a collet over the cue shaft that rides inside those black wheels, I simply used some clear plastic hose, also available at HomeDepot.

I secure the hose from running up and down the shaft with painters tape.

I also use painters tape to help secure the fat end of the shaft to that rubber holder that goes into the drill. I like the setup on this end of the shaft much better than screwing a bolt into the shaft. If your shaft runs out a little on this end because .... after all ... it is a makeshift lathe ... you don't have to worry about snapping the shaft, especially if the shaft threads are directly into the wood with no insert.

Anyway ... it's far from perfect, but it does work perfectly for me and it beats the hell out of rolling the shaft up and down your thighs as you try to sand it! :smile:

Oh, and I found a rheostat foot pedal on ebay with the correct amperage so I could regulate the speed of the variable speed drill with my foot.

Maniac
09-09-2013, 08:24 AM
I talked about this when I first put it together about 4 years or so ago, I thought it might be of interest to some of you who would rather not do tip replacements completely by hand.

This setup was inexpensive, and with a little modification with some stuff from home depot and a little buzz box welder, that if you don't have, one of your buddies probably does, makes an acceptable rig to do tips, shaft tapering, I even made a tenon and replaced a ferrule with this thing.

Anyway it starts with this device I found on EBAY. I have no affiliation with these people, I just think buying something like this gives you a big headstart to a homemade device. This is the piece I bought a while back. (http://www.ebay.com/itm/PORTABLE-DRILL-LATHE-for-POOL-CUE-REPAIR-TIP-SHAFT-TOOL-Includes-How-to-manual-/111159854908?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item19e1a4c73c)

Here are some photos. Basically its three pieces of hardwood sold at HomeDepot. 1 base and 2 other strips.

Then 4 lengths of bar steel and a few wood bolts. This all provides a base for the lathe parts to slide on.

Next I bought a tall nut and a bolt. I welded a piece of angle iron to it that makes a rest for a wood chisel I use to flush up the tip. I welded that to a small rectangular frame I made from the remaining piece of angle iron.

Flat washers guide the movement along the bar steel nicely.

For a collet over the cue shaft that rides inside those black wheels, I simply used some clear plastic hose, also available at HomeDepot.

I secure the hose from running up and down the shaft with painters tape.

I also use painters tape to help secure the fat end of the shaft to that rubber holder that goes into the drill. I like the setup on this end of the shaft much better than screwing a bolt into the shaft. If your shaft runs out a little on this end because .... after all ... it is a makeshift lathe ... you don't have to worry about snapping the shaft, especially if the shaft threads are directly into the wood with no insert.

Anyway ... it's far from perfect, but it does work perfectly for me and it beats the hell out of rolling the shaft up and down your thighs as you try to sand it! :smile:

This is VERY similar to the setup I use. I still have the crutch tip arbor for use on odd-sized pinned shafts, but did you know that you can buy inexpensive arbors for many pin sizes on Ebay? I bought three: 5/16 x 14, 3/8 x 10, and 5/16 x 18. I purchased some large (w/small hole) rubber washers from the hardware store to buffer the end of the arbor from the wood on the shaft. Works great!!!

Maniac

3andstop
09-09-2013, 04:02 PM
This is VERY similar to the setup I use. I still have the crutch tip arbor for use on odd-sized pinned shafts, but did you know that you can buy inexpensive arbors for many pin sizes on Ebay? I bought three: 5/16 x 14, 3/8 x 10, and 5/16 x 18. I purchased some large (w/small hole) rubber washers from the hardware store to buffer the end of the arbor from the wood on the shaft. Works great!!!

Maniac


If you have any pics I'd like to see it.

HueblerHustler7
09-09-2013, 04:10 PM
This is a fantastic thread

Thank you, cant wait to try one myself.

-Drew

mortuarymike-nv
09-09-2013, 04:55 PM
This is a fantastic thread

Thank you, cant wait to try one myself.

-Drew

When it marks up one of your shafts please post your opinion then.

How do you plan on running those hard wheels against soft maple.


MMike

Maniac
09-09-2013, 05:19 PM
When it marks up one of your shafts please post your opinion then.

How do you plan on running those hard wheels against soft maple.


MMike

I run a piece of painters tape around the shaft where it contacts the wheels, being meticulous about getting it on tightly to where there are no wrinkles in the tape.

Listen, I only use my home-made lathe for doing tip repair, and it works GREAT for that. I've had people I have done tip jobs for tell me that I do a better job than Ft. Worth Billiard Supply does.

If you think I'm spending big bucks on a REAL lathe just for doing tip jobs that you nor anyone else with an expensive lathe could not do any better, then I've got a ski resort down here in the Dallas/Fort Worth area I'll sell you for cheap :wink:!!!

Oh, and by the way, my little home-made lathe has NEVER marked up a shaft.

3andstop, I'll try to get you some pics before weeks end (really busy).

Maniac

ROB.M
09-09-2013, 05:19 PM
Cool DIY cue tip installation tool.

Rob.M

Maniac
09-09-2013, 06:12 PM
Not as intricate as 3andstops, but it gets the job done. Except for the arbors and the wheel assembly, I put this together from things I had laying around the garage. Note the rheostat for speed control.



Maniac

Maniac
09-09-2013, 06:14 PM
More pics:

3andstop
09-09-2013, 06:54 PM
When it marks up one of your shafts please post your opinion then.

How do you plan on running those hard wheels against soft maple.


MMike

Did you not read what I wrote? Where the wheels would contact the shaft, you slide a piece of clear plastic tubing over the shaft. Hold it from moving around by taping it in place with some painters tape. The wheels ride on the tubing, not the shaft.


Holy crap Maniac..... LMAO everything is big in texas... you gotta resize those photos :)

Maniac
09-09-2013, 07:09 PM
Holy crap Maniac..... LMAO everything is big in texas... you gotta resize those photos :)

I'm computer illiterate. It's all I can do to get them posted up. :embarrassed2:

Maniac

iusedtoberich
09-09-2013, 08:12 PM
I like your steady rest. I did cue repairs for about 10 years on the side, first on a metal lathe, then a hightower. When I switched to using a utility knife blade for trimming tips, I thought it was much better than my previous process.

If you want to try a utility knife blade, you can probably use your existing steady rest as is. You might be able to dig the point of the blade into the pvc tube, and use that as a pivot. Thats what I used to do... only I'd dig the point of the blade into the soft steel shank of my brazed carbide tool bit. That allowed me to have a lot of control over the blade when I used it to shear the sides of the tip to diameter. You can also make a flat surface for the blade to rest on so that you can trim the front of the tip to shape.

Below is a picture I had made a few years ago how I pivot the blade by digging it into the soft steel. Maybe it will give you an idea for your setup.

Good work for a DIY project.

293445

Flintlock
09-09-2013, 08:48 PM
Wow, great designes, fellas! Very cool!

Miller
09-09-2013, 11:43 PM
I talked about this when I first put it together about 4 years or so ago, I thought it might be of interest to some of you who would rather not do tip replacements completely by hand.

This setup was inexpensive, and with a little modification with some stuff from home depot and a little buzz box welder, that if you don't have, one of your buddies probably does, makes an acceptable rig to do tips, shaft tapering, I even made a tenon and replaced a ferrule with this thing.

Anyway it starts with this device I found on EBAY. I have no affiliation with these people, I just think buying something like this gives you a big headstart to a homemade device. This is the piece I bought a while back. (http://www.ebay.com/itm/PORTABLE-DRILL-LATHE-for-POOL-CUE-REPAIR-TIP-SHAFT-TOOL-Includes-How-to-manual-/111159854908?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item19e1a4c73c)

Here are some photos. Basically its three pieces of hardwood sold at HomeDepot. 1 base and 2 other strips.

Then 4 lengths of bar steel and a few wood bolts. This all provides a base for the lathe parts to slide on.

Next I bought a tall nut and a bolt. I welded a piece of angle iron to it that makes a rest for a wood chisel I use to flush up the tip. I welded that to a small rectangular frame I made from the remaining piece of angle iron.

Flat washers guide the movement along the bar steel nicely.

For a collet over the cue shaft that rides inside those black wheels, I simply used some clear plastic hose, also available at HomeDepot.

I secure the hose from running up and down the shaft with painters tape.

I also use painters tape to help secure the fat end of the shaft to that rubber holder that goes into the drill. I like the setup on this end of the shaft much better than screwing a bolt into the shaft. If your shaft runs out a little on this end because .... after all ... it is a makeshift lathe ... you don't have to worry about snapping the shaft, especially if the shaft threads are directly into the wood with no insert.

Anyway ... it's far from perfect, but it does work perfectly for me and it beats the hell out of rolling the shaft up and down your thighs as you try to sand it! :smile:

Oh, and I found a rheostat foot pedal on ebay with the correct amperage so I could regulate the speed of the variable speed drill with my foot.


clever idea and thanks for sharing.

if you don't mind....i am curious about something.....

what is the "rubber holder" that is chucked up to your drill? is it some kind of a jacobs chuck that you purchased somewhere or something that you fabricated yourself? would you mind posting a close up picture of it?

thanks.

:thumbup:

3andstop
09-10-2013, 01:46 AM
clever idea and thanks for sharing.

if you don't mind....i am curious about something.....

what is the "rubber holder" that is chucked up to your drill? is it some kind of a jacobs chuck that you purchased somewhere or something that you fabricated yourself? would you mind posting a close up picture of it?

thanks.

:thumbup:

The rubber cups... two of them, one fits shaft and one fits butt, comes with that Ebay jig. Check out that seller, I believe he sells them separately as well. Using the correct size tubing and the large size rubber cup, you can also rewrap the butts as well.

mortuarymike-nv
09-10-2013, 03:44 AM
I run a piece of painters tape around the shaft where it contacts the wheels, being meticulous about getting it on tightly to where there are no wrinkles in the tape.

Listen, I only use my home-made lathe for doing tip repair, and it works GREAT for that. I've had people I have done tip jobs for tell me that I do a better job than Ft. Worth Billiard Supply does.

If you think I'm spending big bucks on a REAL lathe just for doing tip jobs that you nor anyone else with an expensive lathe could not do any better, then I've got a ski resort down here in the Dallas/Fort Worth area I'll sell you for cheap :wink:!!!

Oh, and by the way, my little home-made lathe has NEVER marked up a shaft.

3andstop, I'll try to get you some pics before weeks end (really busy).

Maniac

You may not of marked up a shaft, but there is a lot of people who have messed up a shaft with the exact same machine.

I am not trying to put your efforts down. There is more then one way to install a tip.
But I have read over and over where these machines have damage some ones shaft.

These machines have that reputation ,that they put black marks or dent the shafts.
Operator error or not , these machines have that rep.
Really makes no difference to me what anyone uses , I just hope they don't destroy a shaft they really like.
IMO a lathe is the best tool for the job.

Investing a few thousand into a lathe and having room to set it up is not a option for everyone. But its still is the best tool .

MMIke

3andstop
09-10-2013, 05:12 AM
You may not of marked up a shaft, but there is a lot of people who have messed up a shaft with the exact same machine.

I am not trying to put your efforts down. There is more then one way to install a tip.
But I have read over and over where these machines have damage some ones shaft.

These machines have that reputation ,that they put black marks or dent the shafts.
Operator error or not , these machines have that rep.
Really makes no difference to me what anyone uses , I just hope they don't destroy a shaft they really like.
IMO a lathe is the best tool for the job.

Investing a few thousand into a lathe and having room to set it up is not a option for everyone. But its still is the best tool .

MMIke

Maniac is not the guy with this machine first of all, I am ... secondly, I guess you still didn't read what I wrote specifically on this point. I use plastic clear hose .. (tubing) slide it over the shaft after you remove the tip. Then, secure it from sliding by simply using some painters tape on the end of the hose.

The hose acts as a collet ... the wheels NEVER touch the shaft ... the hose does not rotate and there is zero chance of harming the shaft. Your concern is a non issue if the person using the machine has half a brain to take common sense precautions. :rolleyes:

ArizonaPete
09-10-2013, 06:24 AM
clever idea and thanks for sharing.

if you don't mind....i am curious about something.....

what is the "rubber holder" that is chucked up to your drill? is it some kind of a jacobs chuck that you purchased somewhere or something that you fabricated yourself? would you mind posting a close up picture of it?

thanks.

:thumbup:

I used a rubber cane tip purchased from Walgreen's Drug Store for around $3.00 for a shaft holder. I also used a crutch tip for a butt holder on a 1 piece cue. Drill a hole in the center and then install a 1/4" or 3/8" bolt so that you can mount it on an electric drill. I had a similiar set up (but not so elaborate) and used it for several years without any problems. The polyethylene tubing prevents any marking to the cue shaft. I was then fortunate in running across a Harbor Freight metal lathe in a garage sale that I bought for $75. The seller was moving out of town and it was the last evening of the sale. She was asking $150 but accepted my offer of $75 just to get rid of it. Lucky me.

Maniac
09-10-2013, 06:44 AM
You may not of marked up a shaft, but there is a lot of people who have messed up a shaft with the exact same machine.

I am not trying to put your efforts down. There is more then one way to install a tip.
But I have read over and over where these machines have damage some ones shaft.

These machines have that reputation ,that they put black marks or dent the shafts.
Operator error or not , these machines have that rep.
Really makes no difference to me what anyone uses , I just hope they don't destroy a shaft they really like.
IMO a lathe is the best tool for the job.

Investing a few thousand into a lathe and having room to set it up is not a option for everyone. But its still is the best tool .

MMIke

I cannot agree more that a real lathe is the best tool. But like I stated before, I'm not spending big money for a machine to rotate a shaft to do a tip job maybe seven or eight times a year. What I have, and the VERY little money I have invested in it, does a great job.

As far as "operator error", I believe it is important to use a little common sense when using the wheel rollers to hold the end of the shaft steady. First off, like I previously mentioned, I use a strip of 2" painters tape to cover the wood where it makes contact with the rollers so it cannot have a mark "frictioned" (is that a word??? :D) onto it. Then, I only set the shaft onto the bottom rollers and let gravity (not tightening down) hold the top roller to keep the shaft from jumping around. This system has been used for about 4 years now, estimating I've done about 30-40 tip jobs without marking or damaging in any way a single shaft. Believe you me, a person without knowledge can screw up a shaft on a real lathe just as easily as someone could on their home-made lathe (I don't really like to refer to it as a "lathe", more like a "shaft-spinner").

I never thought you were trying to put my efforts down. A warning about damaged shafts using the wheel rollers cannot be construed as anything but constructive advice, and I (and others should) appreciate the warning.
But I've had enough success with my "method" of using this setup now as I don't even consider a damaged shaft a possibility. I will however, continue to be careful and take things slow and easy.

Have a good day, my friend!!! :thumbup:

Maniac

Maniac
09-10-2013, 06:56 AM
I used a rubber cane tip purchased from Walgreen's Drug Store for around $3.00 for a shaft holder. I also used a crutch tip for a butt holder on a 1 piece cue. Drill a hole in the center and then install a 1/4" or 3/8" bolt so that you can mount it on an electric drill. I had a similiar set up (but not so elaborate) and used it for several years without any problems. The polyethylene tubing prevents any marking to the cue shaft. I was then fortunate in running across a Harbor Freight metal lathe in a garage sale that I bought for $75. The seller was moving out of town and it was the last evening of the sale. She was asking $150 but accepted my offer of $75 just to get rid of it. Lucky me.

I use a stove bolt with the head cut off and ground smooth to hold my crutch/cane tips. The smooth shaft on the stove bolt makes for a better fit in the drill chuck as opposed to putting a threaded bolt into it.

All in all, not counting the drill ($30), wheel rollers ($50) and the store-bought arbors (about $6 apiece), and using parts I had laying around the garage, I've got less than $5 invested in my "shaft-spinner".

Maniac

mortuarymike-nv
09-10-2013, 07:55 AM
Maniac is not the guy with this machine first of all, I am ... secondly, I guess you still didn't read what I wrote specifically on this point. I use plastic clear hose .. (tubing) slide it over the shaft after you remove the tip. Then, secure it from sliding by simply using some painters tape on the end of the hose.

The hose acts as a collet ... the wheels NEVER touch the shaft ... the hose does not rotate and there is zero chance of harming the shaft. Your concern is a non issue if the person using the machine has half a brain to take common sense precautions. :rolleyes:


There is always a chance of screwing up a shaft no matter what is used.
And the machine you are using has a lot of angry customers.

There is no reason to be sarcastic , Its not my fault that so many people have had issues with the same machine.

I am only repeating what I have read from the cue makers section.
And I am not willing to jump in the sand box and argue about how anyone replaces a tip.


MMike

3andstop
09-10-2013, 11:24 AM
There is always a chance of screwing up a shaft no matter what is used.
And the machine you are using has a lot of angry customers.

There is no reason to be sarcastic , Its not my fault that so many people have had issues with the same machine.

I am only repeating what I have read from the cue makers section.
And I am not willing to jump in the sand box and argue about how anyone replaces a tip.


MMike


Not at all sarcastic. Absolutely realistic. There are more horse's asses than there are horses out there, and no doubt the complaints about that specific issue came from the idiots who let the wheels roll on the shaft instead of a protective sleeve. What happened to them was supposed to happen to them.

In fact, it's good that you brought it up ... who knows, there may be a horse's ass putting one together as we speak, and the topic just might have saved them.

Not to mention, I'd imagine in the cue makers section, they would rather see folks bring tip replacements to them rather than have it get around that a mickey mouse lathe can do a decent job on tips also. If I was a cue maker I'd tell em all that the shaft will explode if you try to do it youself on one of those homemade lathes. :smile:

abbassi
09-10-2013, 12:28 PM
When it marks up one of your shafts please post your opinion then.

How do you plan on running those hard wheels against soft maple.


MMike

LOL, I was thinking the same thing. All the setup to save $10 on tip installation from a professional installation once or twice a year.

Celophanewrap
09-10-2013, 12:38 PM
I had a similar set up for a while with that POS steady rest with the black hard rubber wheels. even with the tape and the the supplied piece of rubber hose they called a "collet" it still left a circular rut that my shaft never recovered from. I switched the hard rubber wheels to wide gum skateboard wheels and the thing worked out a 100% better. It's still good for clean and wraps but I'd probably never put another shaft on it. But if it works for you then go with it, nice set-up.

3andstop
09-10-2013, 01:03 PM
Doing one's own repairs is not for everyone. Not cue tips, not home improvements, not auto repairs, shoot maybe not tying one's own shoes.

This damned hose is 1/2" ID and 3/4" OD. That's an 1/8th inch wall thickness. You cut the damned thing 2" long and slide it over the cue shaft so it is the only thing in contact with the wheels.

Now you don't call your two strongest friends over the house to hold down the top wheel onto the shaft, you merely loosen the screws and allow it to rest on the hose with only its own weight touching.

You would have to go out of your way to set it up in a fashion that would have any effect on the shaft what so ever. But again, fixing things isn't for everyone, and those who are challenged in that area are better left to have things done for them.

Now I suppose it does annoy me (and it shows) that something so obvious to some is the farthest from the understanding of others. Oh well ... for those with only two thumbs, this is a fine and easy way to install your own tips. Just use common sense.

Ron Swanson
09-10-2013, 01:18 PM
LOL, I was thinking the same thing. All the setup to save $10 on tip installation from a professional installation once or twice a year.

Not everyone has access to a professional installer.

There's some impressive stuff on this thread.

Maniac
09-10-2013, 02:55 PM
LOL, I was thinking the same thing. All the setup to save $10 on tip installation from a professional installation once or twice a year.

C'mon abbissi, most TIPS cost at least $10. There isn't any professionals doing tip jobs for nothing but the cost of the tip.

Fort Worth Billiards Supply once charged me $30 for a Triangle tip install, and THAT was what prompted me to set up my home-made shaft spinner.

I do tip replacement for friends and teammates, so the once or twice a year doesn't hold water either. I charge them whatever the price of the tip is they want installed and have them buy me a Crown & Coke when I bring their shaft to them at the pool hall for labor. Pretty sweet deal for them if you ask me. FTR, I've had nothing but high praise for all the replacement tips I've installed.

Maniac

Blue Hog ridr
09-10-2013, 03:10 PM
I agree with Mike on this one. really, they are nice set ups that will get a tip and shaft maintenance done for you.

Honestly, I have read too many horror stories of people using those 3 wheeled steady rests. I know that you can put tape around the shaft but if you have to resort to that so as to not damage a shaft, I would rather not do it.

Chris Hightower, Todd and a couple of others can make or sell you a steady rest with a bearing in it or a 3 jaw chuck that could easily be adapted to your style of bed or just purchase a small piece of dove tail bed from Taig or any of the other people that I mentioned.

In the long run, you would have so much more peace of mind by using a bearing steady or a chuck and it wouldn't break the bank on you either.

You can still use the drill as a motor, nothing wrong with that way.

abbassi
09-10-2013, 03:20 PM
C'mon abbissi, most TIPS cost at least $10. There isn't any professionals doing tip jobs for nothing but the cost of the tip.

Fort Worth Billiards Supply once charged me $30 for a Triangle tip install, and THAT was what prompted me to set up my home-made shaft spinner.

I do tip replacement for friends and teammates, so the once or twice a year doesn't hold water either. I charge them whatever the price of the tip is they want installed and have them buy me a Crown & Coke when I bring their shaft to them at the pool hall for labor. Pretty sweet deal for them if you ask me. FTR, I've had nothing but high praise for all the replacement tips I've installed.

Maniac

Well, maybe people don't have access to someone with a lathe. By me, the pool halls have lathes. I usually bring a tip, some times not, and give the pool hall owner a chance to make a little extra money. Usually its 10 bucks. They already have a lathe setup just for that. I can do it myself at home, but why bother. On the lathe its 5 minutes.

Maniac
09-10-2013, 03:27 PM
Chris Hightower, Todd and a couple of others can make or sell you a steady rest with a bearing in it or a 3 jaw chuck that could easily be adapted to your style of bed or just purchase a small piece of dove tail bed from Taig or any of the other people that I mentioned.

You can still use the drill as a motor, nothing wrong with that way.

Can you post a picture of this apparatus? I certainly am not at all opposed to making improvements.

Maniac

Blue Hog ridr
09-10-2013, 03:44 PM
http://www.midamericapool.com/

This is Todd's site. he is also helpful and a great guy to do business with. One the first page you can see both a steady rest using s chuck and a little further down, a steady with a bearing. Making a collet to fit inside the bearing is an easy task as you can use
a piece of clear tubing that you have been using any way.

Chris send his out with a piece of green table felt to line the inside of the bearing. That works just as well.

You can purchase plastic or Delrin collets.

You can buy a short piece of aluminum or steel dove tail and screw it down to you mounting board after you drill holes in it.

I think that after seeing your guys set ups, you will be able to look at examples of Todd's lathes and figure out what you might do to modify your lathes to accept a different steady or maybe just make an entirely new set up with a longer piece of dove tail bed, your drill motor and a steady.

If you started that way, eventually you could add a head stock to your set up to replace your drill as they frequently come up for sale in the Machinery Forum for decent prices. Penn State also sells a complete motor assembly for a little over $100.

With the right size rubber O Ring, which is what people use for a pulley anyway, you can attach the Penn State motor and head stock in the future.

With a little dreaming, you could end up with a home made full blown tip lathe for a decent price as well.

Also, if you were to purchase a longer piece of dove tail, enuff to accommodate your entire shaft length, buying a tail stock with a drill chuck, you will be able to do great shaft cleans and even sanding. One piece at a time.

More than one way to skin a cat.

BTW, not trying to be negative re your equipment. I just hate to see people struggle with something, rather than doing a bit of planning and making your job much more easier and professional.

xxxbilliards
09-10-2013, 03:45 PM
I have used a drill
I put a bolt in the chuck cut to the size of pin 5/16 usully and attach a short 1/4 gas line hose aprox 2 inches and stick the bolt cut with the pin size 5/16 X 14 coarse or 5/16 X 18 fine tread ....attach shaft to the pin
Lock the drill on and you have a flexible shaft, now secure / rest over something solid and free hand use a sharp razor usually from a scraper replacent blade single edge to shape your tip as it spins leaving a very little over sized tip and then burnish with a piece of leather till the wall compact and is flush with the ferrol............ as you do one the expirience will set on making future ones easier
Note: don't get to close to the ferrol as you may scar same.........this method is great to clean and burnish your shafts and ferrules
Hope this may be helpfull to somebody

Help someone if you can
Ps. If you have a broken cue, you may use the pin to hold your shaft as well

Blue Hog ridr
09-10-2013, 04:54 PM
Or how about a joint protector if it is small enuff in diameter to fit in your drill chuck.

There is one of the cheapest maintenance arbors that can be had.

Usually they can be used in a regular head stock but like I say, there is always more than one way to skin a cat.

Maniac
09-10-2013, 05:55 PM
More than one way to skin a cat.

BTW, not trying to be negative re your equipment. I just hate to see people struggle with something, rather than doing a bit of planning and making your job much more easier and professional.

BHR, I appreciate the link and all the suggestions, really! But as to the "struggle", "easier", and "professional" part of your post, I just want to say that I do not struggle whatsoever with the setup I have. It couldn't be any easier to use. As I also said in an earlier post, my tip jobs have been lauded as being better than one of the local "professional" tip repair places can do. My tips/shafts DO look like a "professional" job.

Once again, a sincere thanks for the ideas and links, but I'm not convinced that I need to do anything else nor spend any more money for no more than I'm using my setup as is. There's really no need to. Now.......if it happens that someday my setup DOES cause a damaged shaft, then I would at once start looking at other options. I just can't see that happening, if after about 40 tip replacements, it hasn't happened yet.

Maniac (my last post here, I swear)

Blue Hog ridr
09-10-2013, 08:05 PM
Bad choice of word. Sorry.

Just remember, Never is a long time. People can mess up large with a 3500 dollar lathe quite easily too.

jwe711
09-10-2013, 08:30 PM
yea...I guess, I messed up and spent an a$$ load of money...on a bunch of equipment...(and still spending)

But, I Love it...What a hobby...and yes, I charge for the services that I provide, and therefore,
I now feel that I HAVE to have all the professional equipment and top quality products, to do the job properly, precisely and professionally.

I've always been very anal about being a perfectionist...

It's a hobby that's growing...continuously...

mortuarymike-nv
09-10-2013, 10:47 PM
BHR, I appreciate the link and all the suggestions, really! But as to the "struggle", "easier", and "professional" part of your post, I just want to say that I do not struggle whatsoever with the setup I have. It couldn't be any easier to use. As I also said in an earlier post, my tip jobs have been lauded as being better than one of the local "professional" tip repair places can do. My tips/shafts DO look like a "professional" job.

Once again, a sincere thanks for the ideas and links, but I'm not convinced that I need to do anything else nor spend any more money for no more than I'm using my setup as is. There's really no need to. Now.......if it happens that someday my setup DOES cause a damaged shaft, then I would at once start looking at other options. I just can't see that happening, if after about 40 tip replacements, it hasn't happened yet.

Maniac (my last post here, I swear)

If you are worried about me please don't be , I am happy a few of you guys got them to work, and I think your input helps validate what the op was doing.

I value your input...................

MMike