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LHP5
09-10-2013, 10:32 PM
Anyone have a spring loaded case out there that makes the pin push up against the top of the case when closed? Anyone ever have any problems with the pin warping or bending?

I have an old giuseppe case that I want to switch back to, because it's just so much smaller than my instroke, but I realized that the springs were making the pin on the butt shoot up against the top cover of the case. If you've never had a giuseppe case the top flap is like a piece of wood surrounded by felt so its pretty hard. In fact my old break cue had a tall pin that ripped up the felt where it used to sit so I'm guessing there is a good amount of pressure there. I'm worried that all the pressure would damage the pin and even bought a set of joint protectors to see if that would help, but the jp's make the cue even taller adding more pressure. Even worse is when the jp is on the shaft it also now adds pressure to the shaft. I was always told you don't want any pressure on your cue or it will warp so I'm kind of confused why they would make these types of cases.

Anyone know? Thanks.

jka
09-10-2013, 10:57 PM
I certainly wouldn't want a case that put any pressure on my cues. I have an Instroke and a Predator made by Instroke that I am completely happy with.

Donny Lutz
09-11-2013, 11:35 AM
Anyone have a spring loaded case out there that makes the pin push up against the top of the case when closed? Anyone ever have any problems with the pin warping or bending?

I have an old giuseppe case that I want to switch back to, because it's just so much smaller than my instroke, but I realized that the springs were making the pin on the butt shoot up against the top cover of the case. If you've never had a giuseppe case the top flap is like a piece of wood surrounded by felt so its pretty hard. In fact my old break cue had a tall pin that ripped up the felt where it used to sit so I'm guessing there is a good amount of pressure there. I'm worried that all the pressure would damage the pin and even bought a set of joint protectors to see if that would help, but the jp's make the cue even taller adding more pressure. Even worse is when the jp is on the shaft it also now adds pressure to the shaft. I was always told you don't want any pressure on your cue or it will warp so I'm kind of confused why they would make these types of cases.

Anyone know? Thanks.

I haven't encountered that problem. I've owned a few of them, but maybe not the same brand as yours.

GoldCrown
09-11-2013, 07:01 PM
I have a few Guisseppi cases. Springs are there for a reason. They will not harm the cue(butt or shaft). The spring pressure is light. Just enough to make the cue protrude allowing you to pinch and remove your cue. Do not be concerned.

Shaft
09-11-2013, 08:12 PM
Maybe I am overly cautious, but I would not want any axial loading on my shaft. Just me.

PolarBear
09-11-2013, 08:32 PM
Drill a hole in the foam..

JohnPT
09-11-2013, 09:39 PM
I certainly wouldn't want a case that put any pressure on my cues. I have an Instroke and a Predator made by Instroke that I am completely happy with.

You don't like your cues jumping out of the case when you open the lid? Just be ready to catch it in the air lol.

JB Cases
09-12-2013, 06:02 AM
Anyone have a spring loaded case out there that makes the pin push up against the top of the case when closed? Anyone ever have any problems with the pin warping or bending?

I have an old giuseppe case that I want to switch back to, because it's just so much smaller than my instroke, but I realized that the springs were making the pin on the butt shoot up against the top cover of the case. If you've never had a giuseppe case the top flap is like a piece of wood surrounded by felt so its pretty hard. In fact my old break cue had a tall pin that ripped up the felt where it used to sit so I'm guessing there is a good amount of pressure there. I'm worried that all the pressure would damage the pin and even bought a set of joint protectors to see if that would help, but the jp's make the cue even taller adding more pressure. Even worse is when the jp is on the shaft it also now adds pressure to the shaft. I was always told you don't want any pressure on your cue or it will warp so I'm kind of confused why they would make these types of cases.

Anyone know? Thanks.

Normally if you can close your case without applying much pressure then it's 100% that your case is not applying enough pressure to your shafts to bend them.

Do this, take a shaft and apply downward pressure with your hand, or get a glove or something harder so you don't hurt your hand. With only your hand you will find that you cannot bend the shaft without causing yourself pain. With a buffer you will still be adding a lot of pressure before the shaft will move.

IF you were trying to close your case and you had that much pressure then you would obviously know something is wrong and you should not force it.

Ideally you want a case which keeps your cues snug and secure with as little movement as possible. So a case with a spring in it that pushes your cue to the top is better than no spring and allowing your cue to move excessively. I personally do NOT like springs because I feel that there should be no foreign objects inside the cavity that could harm the cue. So no metal pieces.

The other reason I don't like them is because of the fact that springs take up space. The case has to be artificially longer or sacrifice cue capacity if springs are used.

We make a case with a bouncy interior called the Organic Rebound. This interior is all cloth and allows the cues to have the full space to use with.

See it in action here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=S21AatdoCs4#t=117

GoldCrown
09-13-2013, 04:58 AM
The spring gently pushes the cue/butt out of the cylinder that makes removal safer than turning the case sideways or upside down to extract your cue. To be concerned about the spring pressure is making a mountain out of a molehill.