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View Full Version : Best Traiing Aid, Device, Book, or VHS-DVD-CD that help your game


CocoboloCowboy
09-12-2013, 09:07 AM
Give me your list of your pick for, Best Traiing Aid, Device, Book, or VHS-DVD-CD that help your Pool game.

List Only THREE

Scott Lee
09-12-2013, 09:45 AM
Bruce...You already know there are dozens of threads about this subject. :rolleyes:

Scott Lee
http://poolknowledge.com

Pidge
09-12-2013, 09:47 AM
Striped ball, cue and a table.

randyg
09-12-2013, 10:30 AM
A video review of your personal PSR's and stroke.

randyg

StraightPoolIU
09-12-2013, 10:36 AM
I ordered Joe Tucker's 3rd eye stroke trainer. I was skeptical at first, but now I realize that I was not aligning to the center of the cueball correctly even though I thought I was. So it was definitely worth the nominal price.

billf59
09-12-2013, 10:45 AM
Bert kinnester videos and the 0 X kicking and banking and Joe tucker racking secrets

Johnnyt
09-12-2013, 11:18 AM
Book. 99 Critical Shots by Ray Martin. DVD= Almost anything from Joe Tucker. For the guy/gal just starting to play, believe it or not=The Black Widow's DVD. It' a got all the basics starting with the feet all the way to position and jumping. It's a no BS, no gimmick DVD teaching pool the honest way. Johnnyt

Spimp13
09-12-2013, 11:21 AM
A video review of your personal PSR's and stroke.

randyg

+1000...the video does not lie! I remember Randy breaking down my whole process (or lack thereof) and it was a real eye opener. After watching the video I told him I was probably the worst APA 7 in terms of fundamentals and was amazed I could even shoot like I did with those bad fundys. Fortunately he told me he had seen much worse :o

hang-the-9
09-12-2013, 11:33 AM
I'll give 3 but in different time periods.

When I started, the best thing was the Byrons Stadard Book of Pool/Billiards. I pretty much learned from that book and some AccuStats videos to play.

As I got better, I'd have to say AccuStats videos alone got me through, and also watching/playing better players although that's not a training aid, but I did not really have anything else when I was a C player.

At a B level, the best learning I got was from a few Bert Kinister tapes ( two in particular, the "It's A Hanger" and tapes #55 and #56) and the Joe Tucker racking video.

A level, well, we're not quite there yet even on my best night. I can go though some racks like an A player, maybe even a set, but never over a whole tournament.

Delaware Lar
09-12-2013, 11:36 AM
One personal lesson from Max Eberly.

bdorman
09-12-2013, 11:48 AM
I ordered Joe Tucker's 3rd eye stroke trainer. I was skeptical at first, but now I realize that I was not aligning to the center of the cueball correctly even though I thought I was. So it was definitely worth the nominal price.

Unfortunately the Third Eye Trainer doesn't seem to be available anymore. You can buy the white fork (I forget its name) that fits on the ferule and makes sure you're hitting centerball, but the clear plastic "viewer" can't be found anywhere. I even asked Joe and he doesn't have them. It's a shame because it would really help me, now that I'm looking at the OB instead of the CB.

If anyone has one for sale, let me know!

I've got a handful of books and DVDs but nothing that has benefited me much more than instructional videos available on youtube (big thanks to DrDave, forcefollow, Max Eberle, Mike Page, Brian Gramse, Mika Immonen and many others.

As someone mentioned earlier, some of my best education has simply been watching pro matches on youtube, particularly in learning How to Play Safe.

mattb
09-12-2013, 02:59 PM
Buddy Hall stroke trainer. That goofy clear tube is worth it's weight in gold to help straighten a stroke.

99 critical shots.

Winning one pocket/SM&S. It's somewhat advanced for a beginner but it makes you think about possibilities.

CocoboloCowboy
09-12-2013, 03:05 PM
Book, 99 Critical Shots by Ray Martin, Monk DVD Set with Tom Rossman, and Power One Pocket by Fast Lenny with Scott Frost.

dougster26
09-12-2013, 03:10 PM
CJ's videos, Zero X Kicking, and asking Fran Crimi for advice

infest
09-12-2013, 07:59 PM
This is good info guys keep it up.

iusedtoberich
09-12-2013, 08:34 PM
I've done/read/watched many of the things listed in this thread. I still can't beat the guys that were beating me 10 years ago.

But, I have fun trying:)

icucybe
09-13-2013, 04:54 AM
Jimmy Reid's are good!

http://freepoollessons.com/

Also

http://leebrettpool.com/

StraightPoolIU
09-13-2013, 05:57 AM
Unfortunately the Third Eye Trainer doesn't seem to be available anymore. You can buy the white fork (I forget its name) that fits on the ferule and makes sure you're hitting centerball, but the clear plastic "viewer" can't be found anywhere. I even asked Joe and he doesn't have them. It's a shame because it would really help me, now that I'm looking at the OB instead of the CB.

If anyone has one for sale, let me know!

I've got a handful of books and DVDs but nothing that has benefited me much more than instructional videos available on youtube (big thanks to DrDave, forcefollow, Max Eberle, Mike Page, Brian Gramse, Mika Immonen and many others.

As someone mentioned earlier, some of my best education has simply been watching pro matches on youtube, particularly in learning How to Play Safe.

The 3rd Eye is the plastic fork and what I was talking about. That's what I've been using. The clear plastic thing was called the Magic Eye. I've never used it, and you're right it doesn't seem to be available.

jhanso18
09-13-2013, 06:45 AM
NO REPLACEMENT for hitting balls. The biggest thing is finding the drive to practice, and often. If you hit balls for 1-2 hours EVERYDAY, for 2 months you will see a noticable improvement. If you do the same for 4-8 hours, you will see LEAPS AND BOUNDS in your game.

Sharpen your mind, so when you make mistakes you can spot how/why you made it. 90% of the time, a missed shot is due to fundamentals breaking down. If you can isolate and eliminate them you WILL play better.

An extra eye to watch you, whether video or someone that can spot the above errors is huge. Having a check list of things you want to work on is key.

All the best,

Justin Hanson

ctyhntr
09-13-2013, 08:29 AM
I like this post, giving advice in context of the skill level.

I'll give 3 but in different time periods.

When I started, the best thing was the Byrons Stadard Book of Pool/Billiards. I pretty much learned from that book and some AccuStats videos to play.

As I got better, I'd have to say AccuStats videos alone got me through, and also watching/playing better players although that's not a training aid, but I did not really have anything else when I was a C player.

At a B level, the best learning I got was from a few Bert Kinister tapes ( two in particular, the "It's A Hanger" and tapes #55 and #56) and the Joe Tucker racking video.

A level, well, we're not quite there yet even on my best night. I can go though some racks like an A player, maybe even a set, but never over a whole tournament.

Pidge
09-13-2013, 08:50 AM
Best thing anyone can do is get a coach. $500 spent on lessons is better than thousands spent on fancy cues, gimicks and myths.

Books, books and more books. Given all the DVDs available today, I still love nothing more than reading a book about the game. Particularly ones on how to play the game. Tactical views, strategy and the mental side are things that are best learned via text IMO.

Lastly Dr. Daves website. I've had well over 300 hours worth of snooker lessons and yet when I first discovered Dr. Daves website I was learning new things. His videos go into detail and he explains the physics side excellently. All free of charge, too.

CJ Wiley
09-13-2013, 08:55 AM
Learning the most effective techniques in pocket billiards won't necessarily be comfortable or natural - we were not put on this earth to play pool so it's not natural for the human body. One thing in particular that most players don't do right is clearing their hips as they bet down on ever shot.....this is rarely seen except in champion players.

Therefore there's some training that has to be done and some movements in the pre shot routine that most won't just "figure out".....they have to be shown, and this was true in my case and many other champion players.

There's one motion in particular that, when learned, alleviates the concern for "aiming systems" because it puts you in the ideal position to see the "shot connection/line"....this technique takes about 3 weeks to master, and once it's accomplished the entire game(s) opens up and becomes much, much easier to play. 'The Game is the Teacher'

RedEyeJedi
09-13-2013, 08:57 AM
Learning the most effective techniques in pocket billiards won't necessarily be comfortable or natural - we were not put on this earth to play pool so it's not natural for the human body. One thing in particular that most players don't do right is clearing their hips as they bet down on ever shot.....this is rarely seen except in champion players.

Therefore there's some training that has to be done and some movements in the pre shot routine that most won't just "figure out".....they have to be shown, and this was true in my case and many other champion players.

There's one motion in particular that, when learned, alleviates the concern for "aiming systems" because it puts you in the ideal position to see the "shot connection/line"....this technique takes about 3 weeks to master, and once it's accomplished the entire game(s) opens up and becomes much, much easier to play. 'The Game is the Teacher'

What does it mean to "clear" the hips, C.J.?

And re: OP, my recommendation is and always will be the book that has helped me more with billiards than any other -- Zen in the Art of Archery. :)

CJ Wiley
09-13-2013, 09:22 AM
What does it mean to "clear" the hips, C.J.?

And re: OP, my recommendation is and always will be the book that has helped me more with billiards than any other -- Zen in the Art of Archery. :)

I agree that 'Zen in the Art of Archery' is one of the best books I've ever read for pool too.

"Clearing the Hips" is something that comes up in golf, tennis and pool. In golf if you don't clear the hips at the top of the back swing you club won't fall into the correct slot and you'll "hit from the top"....or they call it "casting".....the effect is a slice in most cases. The hips are a great power source, however, because of how our body's are shaped they also get in the way....professional athletes learn ways to alleviate this issue, but it does take time and specific training to achieve....it's not "natural" for sure.

In pool you must have a system to "Clear the Hips" or you can't get into the right position to see the shot properly (so you have to tilt your head to the left and it distorts your natural line of sight). If you use the side of the right hip to match up the line of the shot visually it doesn't work and you have to make unnecessary adjustments....that cause more adjustments...this takes up valuable "mental horsepower" on each shot and although a player may learn to still play well, they will never reach their full potential.

Willie Mosconi is the first one I saw that taught this (in one of his original videos), but left out the crucial part of the movement, the part that's the most difficult to teach. He, like most champion players either learned it, or stumbled on it from playing thousands of hours with other champions......we do learn things unconsciously when competing regularly for money ;)

I completely understand why he made no attempt to teach this, and quite frankly it's the most difficult part to learn (and teach).....I watch to see how players execute this part of the pre shot routine and if they don't do it correctly I immediately know they're limited in how well they can play......it's about the feet (foundation) and it's also about the clearing of the hips at the right moment, in the correct way. 'The Game is the Teacher'

RedEyeJedi
09-13-2013, 09:26 AM
I agree that 'Zen in the Art of Archery' is one of the best books I've ever read for pool too.

"Clearing the Hips" is something that comes up in golf, tennis and pool. In golf if you don't clear the hips at the top of the back swing you club won't fall into the correct slot and you'll "hit from the top"....or they call it "casting".....the effect is a slice in most cases. The hips are a great power source, however, because of how our body's are shaped they also get in the way....professional athletes learn ways to alleviate this issue, but it does take time and specific training to achieve....it's not "natural" for sure.

In pool you must have a system to "Clear the Hips" or you can't get into the right position to see the shot properly (so you have to tilt your head to the left and it distorts your natural line of sight). If you use the side of the right hip to match up the line of the shot visually it doesn't work and you have to make unnecessary adjustments....that cause more adjustments...this takes up valuable "mental horsepower" on each shot and although a player may learn to still play well, they will never reach their full potential.

Willie Mosconi is the first one I saw that taught this (in one of his original videos), but left out the crucial part of the movement, the part that's the most difficult to teach. He, like most champion players either learned it, or stumbled on it from playing thousands of hours with other champions......we do learn things unconsciously when competing regularly for money ;)

I completely understand why he made no attempt to teach this, and quite frankly it's the most difficult part to learn (and teach).....I watch to see how players execute this part of the pre shot routine and if they don't do it correctly I immediately know they're limited in how well they can play......it's about the feet (foundation) and it's also about the clearing of the hips at the right moment, in the correct way. 'The Game is the Teacher'

*Mind-blown.* Thanks for the tip, C.J.! I'm off to the table to study this thought.

fasted71465
09-13-2013, 09:29 AM
Buddy Hall on 9 ball is one I remember the most. He runs 9 racks and he shows exactly where the cue ball is going and why. He plans 3 shots ahead tells you how and why.

TX Poolnut
09-13-2013, 09:34 AM
The PAT tests and having a pro live with me for several years.

I highly recommend both.

Limpkinw
09-13-2013, 09:49 AM
The Zero-X DVD set, Jerry Briesath's DVD set and a bunch of time on the table in my basement.

Brian in VA
09-13-2013, 10:48 AM
For me it was:

My first lesson with Scott Lee

Pool School with Scott and Randy G

George Fels book - the title escapes me at the moment but it has to do with playing great pool and focuses mostly on 14.1. Most of it applies to other games as well but it got me looking at the table in a different way.

Brian in VA

CJ Wiley
09-13-2013, 12:19 PM
*Mind-blown.* Thanks for the tip, C.J.! I'm off to the table to study this thought.

I may put together a video at some point to show how this process works (clearing the hips to get the ideal visual perspective of every shot), as far as I know it's never been shown in detail. The only reason I can show it is from teaching the martial arts for 22 years has given me a keen insight on how the body functions, and how to train others to accomplish these type movements.

Most people seem to be unaware of their body holistically, so they isolate parts that really have no direct influence on their game. The foundation of the feet, then the center of the body (the hips) are the places that are most neglected in instruction and arguably the most critical areas of potential improvement.

To put it all in place you must first take it apart and refine all the moving parts. I show most of this on my 'Ultimate Pool Secrets' DVD, but it's challenging to show everything at once.....it usually takes a 3 week process. Watching any DVD once or taking a couple hour lesson won't do much good with out the dedication to open you mind and make the effort to incorporate new techniques that work under pressure and competition. 'The Game is the Teacher'

lee brett
09-13-2013, 12:48 PM
I may put together a video at some point to show how this process works (clearing the hips to get the ideal visual perspective of every shot), as far as I know it's never been shown in detail. The only reason I can show it is from teaching the martial arts for 22 years has given me a keen insight on how the body functions, and how to train others to accomplish these type movements.

Most people seem to be unaware of their body holistically, so they isolate parts that really have no direct influence on their game. The foundation of the feet, then the center of the body (the hips) are the places that are most neglected in instruction and arguably the most critical areas of potential improvement.

To put it all in place you must first take it apart and refine all the moving parts. I show most of this on my 'Ultimate Pool Secrets' DVD, but it's challenging to show everything at once.....it usually takes a 3 week process. Watching any DVD once or taking a couple hour lesson won't do much good with out the dedication to open you mind and make the effort to incorporate new techniques that work under pressure and competition. 'The Game is the Teacher'


Hey CJ,

I agree on this. I teach this to everyone i teach about placing your feet in the correct position and making sure your hips are open and not in the way of the shot.

I wrote an article a while ago now on aiming with the feet. Mike H has is but has not posted it yet.

I will ask him if i can post it on here, or if he is going to publish it on the main page.

Keep up the good work.

Lee

hang-the-9
09-13-2013, 02:56 PM
The PAT tests and having a pro live with me for several years.

I highly recommend both.

I'll ask Earl what he's doing till 2017. Hope he likes my couch.

nobcitypool
09-13-2013, 05:13 PM
Most devices end up being fairly useless. The Break Rak on the other hand is a great training aid device.

Dr. Dave's VEPS series of DVDs are great as is Jerry Brieseth's. Far and away the best I've viewed. Of course, I'm a fan of Stan's CTE/Pro One DVD.

After that, personal lessons.

Bavafongoul
09-13-2013, 07:48 PM
"BIILIARDS
as it should be played"

By Willie Hoppe...........Copyright 1941....... The Reilly & Lee Co. , Chicago, Illinois

IMO.......this book is the masterpiece publication of all time on billiards (3 cushion), It was written more than 70 years ago and it still rates #1.

CJ Wiley
09-13-2013, 09:01 PM
Hey CJ,

I agree on this. I teach this to everyone i teach about placing your feet in the correct position and making sure your hips are open and not in the way of the shot.

I wrote an article a while ago now on aiming with the feet. Mike H has is but has not posted it yet.

I will ask him if i can post it on here, or if he is going to publish it on the main page.

Keep up the good work.

Lee

Yes, this the advanced reason for setting the left foot parallel to the line of the shot....it allows you to slightly adjust your aim using the foot, while keeping the upper body angles consistent. You have a snooker background so you understand the advantages to an open stance and a square look at the shot.....it's superior to the normal pool stance that's taught, however, as you noted, the feet must be placed properly and consistently to gain the full advantage.

RedEyeJedi
09-14-2013, 05:25 AM
I may put together a video at some point to show how this process works (clearing the hips to get the ideal visual perspective of every shot), as far as I know it's never been shown in detail. The only reason I can show it is from teaching the martial arts for 22 years has given me a keen insight on how the body functions, and how to train others to accomplish these type movements.

Most people seem to be unaware of their body holistically, so they isolate parts that really have no direct influence on their game. The foundation of the feet, then the center of the body (the hips) are the places that are most neglected in instruction and arguably the most critical areas of potential improvement.

To put it all in place you must first take it apart and refine all the moving parts. I show most of this on my 'Ultimate Pool Secrets' DVD, but it's challenging to show everything at once.....it usually takes a 3 week process. Watching any DVD once or taking a couple hour lesson won't do much good with out the dedication to open you mind and make the effort to incorporate new techniques that work under pressure and competition. 'The Game is the Teacher'

I've seen these sorts of things casually mentioned before, and usually with emphasis on how incredibly important and overlooked it is. I've never thought much about it because, as you say, much of this does feel quite unnatural to the human body, and I worry that I'm making bad changes to my form. I would certainly love to see a video explaining it a little better, you can only do so much through text. I'll keep my eyes open for it! The Game certainly is the Teacher.

Also looking forward to that article from Mr. Brett!

CocoboloCowboy
09-14-2013, 07:02 AM
Like Surfing you can learn to surf sitting on the beach, or in some surfing school studing theory. After you read, or what ever you learn from. You got to play, and hit thousands of ball, after basic are mastered, if that is possible.

JoeW
09-14-2013, 08:18 AM
#1 Pool School with Randy G. Set me on the right path.

#2 and #3 of equal importance. The internet and other postings of Bob Jewett and Dr. Dave. Contain more useful information than I can ever master.

#4 Internet videos of pros playing

CJ Wiley
09-14-2013, 09:56 AM
I've seen these sorts of things casually mentioned before, and usually with emphasis on how incredibly important and overlooked it is. I've never thought much about it because, as you say, much of this does feel quite unnatural to the human body, and I worry that I'm making bad changes to my form. I would certainly love to see a video explaining it a little better, you can only do so much through text. I'll keep my eyes open for it! The Game certainly is the Teacher.

Also looking forward to that article from Mr. Brett!

Yes, the fact of the matter is, "either you do it correct or your subconscious will always have to go through a series of RE adjustments to get the right perception of the shot" - this is what players will struggle with all their life, then label the re adjustments as part of their pre shot routine and teach it ...... this has been going on for the last 30 years, and passed down until the "easy to teach" techniques are "common knowledge".

That's what I saw when I started reading some of this forum info. - it was simply heading people down a dead end street. Once you're shown the truth it will set you free to differentiate the effective way to play from the way that's commonly taught.....there's a recognizable difference. 'The Game is the Teacher'

One Pocket John
09-14-2013, 12:39 PM
Yes, the fact of the matter is, "either you do it correct or your subconscious will always have to go through a series of RE adjustments to get the right perception of the shot" - this is what players will struggle with all their life, then label the re adjustments as part of their pre shot routine and teach it ...... this has been going on for the last 30 years, and passed down until the "easy to teach" techniques are "common knowledge".

That's what I saw when I started reading some of this forum info. - it was simply heading people down a dead end street. Once you're shown the truth it will set you free to differentiate the effective way to play from the way that's commonly taught.....there's a recognizable difference. 'The Game is the Teacher'

Went to your Facebook page. Your head needs a tan. Looks cool though.

If you could dogleg thru St. Louis that would be cool. Could meet you at Cue & Cushion in Overland MO. on a Friday thru Monday during the day.

Take care and travel safely.

John :)

DunnM1
09-14-2013, 04:25 PM
Better than a book, better than a DVD and better than drills. DEE ADKINS!

CJ Wiley
09-14-2013, 06:27 PM
Went to your Facebook page. Your head needs a tan. Looks cool though.

If you could dogleg thru St. Louis that would be cool. Could meet you at Cue & Cushion in Overland MO. on a Friday thru Monday during the day.

Take care and travel safely.

John :)

Last time I was at Cue & Cushion I was with Rusty Branemiere and he was playing Bill Berry....I think Tom Ferry was around that day too.

Does that "date me" or what?

Man, could Rusty play banks and one pocket, He was "Tommy Tucker the Pool Sucker" and I was "Butch" from the mountains of Tennessee when we were traveling on the road together.

The stories I could tell from those road trips would be interesting to put together....Rusty and I ALWAYS got the money in Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky - there was some great players around there too.

The only guy I didn't beat (we broke even) was a guy named John Brumback....some of you may have heard that name before.

'The Road was the Teacher'

stan shuffett
09-14-2013, 07:02 PM
Last time I was at Cue & Cushion I was with Rusty Branemiere and he was playing Bill Berry....I think Tom Ferry was around that day too.

Does that "date me" or what?

Man, could Rusty play banks and one pocket, He was "Tommy Tucker the Pool Sucker" and I was "Butch" from the mountains of Tennessee when we were traveling on the road together.

The stories I could tell from those road trips would be interesting to put together....Rusty and I ALWAYS got the money in Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky - there was some great players around there too.

The only guy I didn't beat (we broke even) was a guy named John Brumback....some of you may have heard that name before.

'The Road was the Teacher'

CJ, You bring back memories with the mention of Rusty. I only played him once and that was at the Kentucky Open in 1985 at Jimmy Hodges's Cue Time. I won my first match against Louie Lemke 11/10. I played Paul Campbell the next match and he went all in for about 900 with a bookie on our match and I came out on top 11/4. Miss that guy. Paulie was a lot of fun. I played Rusty next and played well to be up at 10/9 and then he came with extremely tough long rail banks to win each of the last 2 games. I mean he cranked'em in when it counted, too. Kim Davenport spanked me my next match and went on to win the event , the first of his many professional tournament victories.

Stan Shuffett

ENGLISH!
09-14-2013, 07:24 PM
Yes, this the advanced reason for setting the left foot parallel to the line of the shot....it allows you to slightly adjust your aim using the foot, while keeping the upper body angles consistent. You have a snooker background so you understand the advantages to an open stance and a square look at the shot.....it's superior to the normal pool stance that's taught, however, as you noted, the feet must be placed properly and consistently to gain the full advantage.

Hi CJ,

I naturally gravitated to an 'open' 'square' stance with a 'face on' level head when I was 13 years old. Perhaps I did that because I was also playing other sports, hitting a baseball, tennis ball, pieces of old rubber hose with a broom stick, etc. Anyway, it was natural to me.

We walk around all day long with our head & eyes level & do so many other tasks face on. I have gotten many a young foul ball hitter into hitting doubles, triples, & home runs, just by getting their heads & eyes level & facing the incoming ball with little to no other adjustments. Just doing that allowed their natural hand eye coordination to work by just taking a road block out of the way.

I just wanted to throw my support behind what you're saying & what I feel is a more 'naturally correct' method.

Best Regards & Best Wishes,
Rick

ENGLISH!
09-14-2013, 07:32 PM
Yes, the fact of the matter is, "either you do it correct or your subconscious will always have to go through a series of RE adjustments to get the right perception of the shot" - this is what players will struggle with all their life, then label the re adjustments as part of their pre shot routine and teach it ...... this has been going on for the last 30 years, and passed down until the "easy to teach" techniques are "common knowledge".

That's what I saw when I started reading some of this forum info. - it was simply heading people down a dead end street. Once you're shown the truth it will set you free to differentiate the effective way to play from the way that's commonly taught.....there's a recognizable difference. 'The Game is the Teacher'

Tap! Tap! Tap!

CJ Wiley
09-14-2013, 09:45 PM
CJ, You bring back memories with the mention of Rusty. I only played him once and that was at the Kentucky Open in 1985 at Jimmy Hodges's Cue Time. I won my first match against Louie Lemke 11/10. I played Paul Campbell the next match and he went all in for about 900 with a bookie on our match and I came out on top 11/4. Miss that guy. Paulie was a lot of fun. I played Rusty next and played well to be up at 10/9 and then he came with extremely tough long rail banks to win each of the last 2 games. I mean he cranked'em in when it counted, too. Kim Davenport spanked me my next match and went on to win the event , the first of his many professional tournament victories.

Stan Shuffett

Paulie Campbell was great action and a funny character too. "South Side" Louie Lemke I tried to trap in Minnesota but he somehow knew not to play.....Jimmy Hodges was a really solid players, I had him giving me the 8 Ball at his pool room in Kentucky and it was all I could do to win, I had to run a "5 Pack" at the end on him.

I haven't heard those names in a while, those guys were all great action, and no, they didn't play like Rusty...or Kim D.

Another player that was around back then was Mike Johnson, I played him several time for some pretty big money, although we played his best game which was bar table. I believe he ended committing suicide, which was sad, he had a lot of heart and I respected that quality.

"Country Calvin," Reid Pierce and Joe Lawrence were also traveling around gambling a lot in those days.....brings back a lot of memories, Stan, it sure was an adventure [in pool] back then wasn't it? :thumbup2:

stan shuffett
09-15-2013, 05:20 AM
Paulie Campbell was great action and a funny character too. "South Side" Louie Lemke I tried to trap in Minnesota but he somehow knew not to play.....Jimmy Hodges was a really solid players, I had him giving me the 8 Ball at his pool room in Kentucky and it was all I could do to win, I had to run a "5 Pack" at the end on him.

I haven't heard those names in a while, those guys were all great action, and no, they didn't play like Rusty...or Kim D.

Another player that was around back then was Mike Johnson, I played him several time for some pretty big money, although we played his best game which was bar table. I believe he ended committing suicide, which was sad, he had a lot of heart and I respected that quality.

"Country Calvin," Reid Pierce and Joe Lawrence were also traveling around gambling a lot in those days.....brings back a lot of memories, Stan, it sure was an adventure [in pool] back then wasn't it? :thumbup2:

Yes, Cj. It was a vastly different time for pool back then. Of course, I was in a classroom teaching and had extremely limited experiences compared to what you had. I was lucky to get play in the Kentucky Open. That particular event fell on my spring break. I was in heaven for that week. I was mostly a weekend warrior of some sort. I got to play somewhere most every weekend for years when I was really after it.
Stan Shuffett

CreeDo
09-16-2013, 09:41 AM
1. 99 Critical Shots book
2. Dr. Dave's website

I'm not sure if you really need a #3. Maybe a breakrak.

sfleinen
09-16-2013, 09:52 AM
1. 99 Critical Shots book
2. Dr. Dave's website

I'm not sure if you really need a #3. Maybe a breakrak.

I echo this same list. Even though I give Dr. Dave quite a ribbing for how he strip-mines the AZB forums and his sometimes jabberwocky advertising, his site is definitely chock-full of anything and everything you'd want to sit down with a cup of coffee and get lost in. Lots of great stuff there.

I'd add a third item to that list, and that would be:

3. Joe Tucker's "Third Eye Stroke Trainer (http://seyberts.com/products/Third_Eye_Stroke_Trainer_w/_DVD-318-84.html)." For the simple reason that it keeps you honest and well-tuned in not only knowing where true center axis is, but also -- as a result -- in actually hitting the cue ball where you "think" you're hitting it. One of the best tools to diagnose head/eye alignment and cueing perception issues there is.

-Sean

dr_dave
09-16-2013, 12:32 PM
The PAT testsHave you tried the Billiard University (BU) Exams yet? If not, give them a try. The BU system is similar to PAT, but better, IMO. For more info, see the BU thread (http://forums.azbilliards.com/showthread.php?t=321301) or the BU website (http://billiarduniversity.org/). BTW, if you try the BU Exams, please post your score (and videos if available) on the BU thread (http://forums.azbilliards.com/showthread.php?t=321301).

Enjoy,
Dave

hang-the-9
09-16-2013, 01:00 PM
Our Jr Pool League here in Mass has got some new players, you sent me your older video a while back for the kids to watch, and I will have them go though it and work on things with them. Several of the new kids show some promise, including an 8 or so yr old girl that lines up and bridges like a pro already. I am working with a few of them to show them how to line up properly on the shot before even getting down in the full shooting stance with the bridge and why it's important to hit where you are aiming on the cueball.

Thanks for that video and I'll be posting some pictures of the kids in their learning process since everyone talks about the "future of pool", some of us are working on creating the players for that future :smile:

I may put together a video at some point to show how this process works (clearing the hips to get the ideal visual perspective of every shot), as far as I know it's never been shown in detail. The only reason I can show it is from teaching the martial arts for 22 years has given me a keen insight on how the body functions, and how to train others to accomplish these type movements.

Most people seem to be unaware of their body holistically, so they isolate parts that really have no direct influence on their game. The foundation of the feet, then the center of the body (the hips) are the places that are most neglected in instruction and arguably the most critical areas of potential improvement.

To put it all in place you must first take it apart and refine all the moving parts. I show most of this on my 'Ultimate Pool Secrets' DVD, but it's challenging to show everything at once.....it usually takes a 3 week process. Watching any DVD once or taking a couple hour lesson won't do much good with out the dedication to open you mind and make the effort to incorporate new techniques that work under pressure and competition. 'The Game is the Teacher'

CJ Wiley
09-16-2013, 01:04 PM
Our Jr Pool League here in Mass has got some new players, you sent me your older video a while back for the kids to watch, and I will have them go though it and work on things with them. Several of the new kids show some promise, including an 8 or so yr old girl that lines up and bridges like a pro already. I am working with a few of them to show them how to line up properly on the shot before even getting down in the full shooting stance with the bridge and why it's important to hit where you are aiming on the cueball.

Thanks for that video and I'll be posting some pictures of the kids in their learning process since everyone talks about the "future of pool", some of us are working on creating the players for that future :smile:

That would be fantastic....the future of pool is getting better every day in every way.

mortuarymike-nv
09-16-2013, 01:07 PM
A video of yourself playing pool .


MMike

hang-the-9
09-16-2013, 03:06 PM
A video of yourself playing pool .


MMike

I don't know how that will help you get better, but here you go. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W6KKnuZWiWE

mr8ball
09-16-2013, 04:20 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BOd6gt6G1S0

and lots of practice

mr8ball
09-16-2013, 04:25 PM
Here is Joe Tuckers 3rd eye trainer. ALso a great product

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GYsNj7EXaAA

CJ Wiley
09-18-2013, 01:21 PM
'Zen if the Art of Archery' is {by far} the best "pool book" I ever read, here' an example of a page out of the book - the trick is to replace the word "archery" with the word "pool".

" Stop thinking about the shot! " the Master called out.

" That way it is bound to fail. "

" I canít help it, " I answered, " the tension gets too painful. "

" You only feel it because you havenít really let go of yourself.
It is all so simple.

You can learn from an ordinary bamboo leaf
what ought to happen. It bends lower and lower under the
weight of snow.

Suddenly the snow slips to the ground without
the leaf having stirred.

Stay like that at the point of highest
tension until the shot falls from you.

So, indeed, it is: when the
tension is fulfilled, the shot must fall, it must fall from the archer
like snow from a bamboo leaf, before he even thinks it. "

'The Game is the Teacher'

BeachBum2012
09-18-2013, 01:39 PM
+1000...the video does not lie! I remember Randy breaking down my whole process (or lack thereof) and it was a real eye opener. After watching the video I told him I was probably the worst APA 7 in terms of fundamentals and was amazed I could even shoot like I did with those bad fundys. Fortunately he told me he had seen much worse :o

That sounds like me. I'm an APA 7 and I know my fundamentals are just terrible. I need to find someone local to work with. I've been recording myself and trying to adjust, but I think another set of eyes would be better.

allanpsand
09-18-2013, 01:58 PM
When I was young - "Willie Mosconi's On Pocket Billiards" to basic fundamentals.

After too many years of bar banging - "99 Critical Shots" woke me up to actually considering physics in my game. Bob Byrnes' books were also early study tools.

Lately, the concept of progressive exercises as explained by San Francisco Billiards Academy (Bob Jewett & group).

Now - learning from the consequences of success and failure.

CJ Wiley
09-18-2013, 02:33 PM
This has always been my 2nd favorite pool book...just replace "tennis" with "pool".


http://coachingcommons.org/wp-content/uploads/2009/01/coaching-commons-books-001-262x300.jpg (http://www.tennismindgame.com/inner-game-tennis.html)CLICK FOR MORE INFO

Pidge
09-18-2013, 02:40 PM
Here is the book that's taught me the most. Just replace "fun" with "pool".

CJ Wiley
09-18-2013, 02:45 PM
Here is the book that's taught me the most. Just replace "fun" with "pool".

another great one.....this is informative for stake horses too, just replace "bad" with "pool balls".

http://www.chud.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/breaking_bad_ver7_xlg-600x889.jpg

bud green
09-18-2013, 06:31 PM
"BIILIARDS
as it should be played"

By Willie Hoppe...........Copyright 1941....... The Reilly & Lee Co. , Chicago, Illinois

IMO.......this book is the masterpiece publication of all time on billiards (3 cushion), It was written more than 70 years ago and it still rates #1.

I'm going to have to disagree with you on this one. Many of the diagrams are wrong, he didn't really author it, and much better material has since been put out.

If you would have mentioned Daly's billiard book, I would say ok. Ceuelemens Mr 100 is a great one to have as well.

Byrne's first two books on pool are still the best things out there for someone interested in both pool and billiards.

After Byrne and watching Accu-Stat videos, especially one pocket and straight pool videos, I would say Walt Harris's Billiard Atlas books have made the biggest day to day improvement in my game (kicking for pool, system shots for three cushion).

I honestly can't think of an instructional video I've seen that was better than the books I have or a good match video with good commentary. Stroke mechanics seem like something that you really would benefit more from a qualified instructor being there in person than a video or book.