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sunnyone
09-16-2013, 12:06 PM
Dear Gentle Readers,

In the tremulous tapioca (no, not shaky puddin’! Louts!) that seems to be the essence of my pool-brain, I’ve been thinking about pivotal pool shots.

In one-pocket -- to me anyway -- the most intriguing shot is, so often, the one following the break.

(A boyfriend I used to know compared it to the second-shot options on a golf hole where you’re supposed to make in five tries. But the good golfers shoot for four, or even three. My meager point, I think, is that the second shot positions a golf guy to go for it or, alternatively, to play it safe in that particular encounter. Okay, I don’t really understand golf!)

Having watched an hour or so of the Steinway 14.1 competition, I am, of course, now uber-qualified to comment on the subtleties of straight pool.

Here, it seems to me, that the break-out shot -- the one following a 14-ball run -- is central to the success of the following inning. I was continually startled (not, unfortunately, an uncommon phenomenon when I’m watching pool!) by the variety of strategies for this crucial shot:

Hard / medium / soft.

Low / center / high.

Right / center / left.

Okay, the usual suspects.

Beyond that, what I gathered from the commentators, was that the player would select a precise entry point into the rack -- a specific ball, the gap between two balls, a tiny slice of one particular ball -- all coordinated with the above options.

Plus ... the decision to stay down table, go up table, go up table aggressively and return apace (Thorsten Hohmann) … etc.

Is there a similar key-shot philosophy for other games?

Such as banks? Is there a comparable, consistent, turning-point shot in that game?

My sense is that in the bang-bang rotation games, and in 8-ball, the break is critical. But is there also a win / lose decision point that often follows the break?

Or, am I over-reaching in trying to find a strategy pattern that even a pool-doofus such as I am can understand?

Rigorous inquiry, billiards-wise, is my life,

Sunny

P. S. Speaking of the Steinway 14.1, wasn’t it grand to see Astoria spotlighted!

P. P. S. And, speaking further of Queens, here’s a fun little trivia question: can you name the five NYC boroughs in alphabetical order? You can win tons of free drinks with this one. Even among the natives. Especially among the natives!

(Hint: the correct answer is not: Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, Staten Island.)

Dunnn51
09-16-2013, 12:47 PM
Dear Gentle Readers,

In the tremulous tapioca (no, not shaky puddin’! Louts!) that seems to be the essence of my pool-brain, I’ve been thinking about pivotal pool shots.

In one-pocket -- to me anyway -- the most intriguing shot is, so often, the one following the break.

(A boyfriend I used to know compared it to the second-shot options on a golf hole where you’re supposed to make in five tries. But the good golfers shoot for four, or even three. My meager point, I think, is that the second shot positions a golf guy to go for it or, alternatively, to play it safe in that particular encounter. Okay, I don’t really understand golf!)

Having watched an hour or so of the Steinway 14.1 competition, I am, of course, now uber-qualified to comment on the subtleties of straight pool.

Here, it seems to me, that the break-out shot -- the one following a 14-ball run -- is central to the success of the following inning. I was continually startled (not, unfortunately, an uncommon phenomenon when I’m watching pool!) by the variety of strategies for this crucial shot:

Hard / medium / soft.

Low / center / high.

Right / center / left.

Okay, the usual suspects.

Beyond that, what I gathered from the commentators, was that the player would select a precise entry point into the rack -- a specific ball, the gap between two balls, a tiny slice of one particular ball -- all coordinated with the above options.

Plus ... the decision to stay down table, go up table, go up table aggressively and return apace (Thorsten Hohmann) … etc.

Is there a similar key-shot philosophy for other games? of course there is !

Such as banks? Is there a comparable, consistent, turning-point shot in that game?

My sense is that in the bang-bang rotation games Bang Bang ??? bang ,BANG ?? <---- you are trying to get even here! and in 8-ball, the break is critical. But is there also a win / lose decision point that often follows the break?

Or, am I over-reaching in trying to find a strategy pattern that even a pool-doofus such as I am can understand?

Rigorous inquiry, billiards-wise, is my life, (Well, you got that right !)

Sunny

P. S. Speaking of the Steinway 14.1, wasn’t it grand to see Astoria spotlighted!

P. P. S. And, speaking further of Queens, here’s a fun little trivia question: can you name the five NYC boroughs in alphabetical order? You can win tons of free drinks with this one. Even among the natives. Especially among the natives!

(Hint: the correct answer is not: Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, Staten Island.)

EVERY game has a pivotal point, you just need to be able to recognize it. (Even "bang,bang" games ! )
Keep looking Blondie ! :thumbup::grin:

CJ Wiley
09-16-2013, 12:52 PM
Dear Gentle Readers,

In the tremulous tapioca (no, not shaky puddin’! Louts!) that seems to be the essence of my pool-brain, I’ve been thinking about pivotal pool shots.

In one-pocket -- to me anyway -- the most intriguing shot is, so often, the one following the break.

(A boyfriend I used to know compared it to the second-shot options on a golf hole where you’re supposed to make in five tries. But the good golfers shoot for four, or even three. My meager point, I think, is that the second shot positions a golf guy to go for it or, alternatively, to play it safe in that particular encounter. Okay, I don’t really understand golf!)

Having watched an hour or so of the Steinway 14.1 competition, I am, of course, now uber-qualified to comment on the subtleties of straight pool.

Here, it seems to me, that the break-out shot -- the one following a 14-ball run -- is central to the success of the following inning. I was continually startled (not, unfortunately, an uncommon phenomenon when I’m watching pool!) by the variety of strategies for this crucial shot:

Hard / medium / soft.

Low / center / high.

Right / center / left.

Okay, the usual suspects.

Beyond that, what I gathered from the commentators, was that the player would select a precise entry point into the rack -- a specific ball, the gap between two balls, a tiny slice of one particular ball -- all coordinated with the above options.

Plus ... the decision to stay down table, go up table, go up table aggressively and return apace (Thorsten Hohmann) … etc.

Is there a similar key-shot philosophy for other games?

Such as banks? Is there a comparable, consistent, turning-point shot in that game?

My sense is that in the bang-bang rotation games, and in 8-ball, the break is critical. But is there also a win / lose decision point that often follows the break?

Or, am I over-reaching in trying to find a strategy pattern that even a pool-doofus such as I am can understand?

Rigorous inquiry, billiards-wise, is my life,

Sunny

P. S. Speaking of the Steinway 14.1, wasn’t it grand to see Astoria spotlighted!

P. P. S. And, speaking further of Queens, here’s a fun little trivia question: can you name the five NYC boroughs in alphabetical order? You can win tons of free drinks with this one. Even among the natives. Especially among the natives!

(Hint: the correct answer is not: Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, Staten Island.)

Yes, the Touch of Inside Shot (TOI) is the one that unlocks the door of mastery. ;)

http://ts3.mm.bing.net/th?id=H.4512585887580814&pid=15.1&H=136&W=160

ENGLISH!
09-16-2013, 01:03 PM
sunnyone,

You have a rather unique writing style that I am rather sure emulates the rest of your style.

Is there a story behind your avatar picture?

And... did you take the handle sunnyone from the song Sunny...with the lyric...sunny one so true... I...

Sorry for being so presumptuous with the questions, but this is a discussion forum.

If I have over stepped, just give me a look & turn & walk away. That is so much more productive then a slap.

Regards & Best Wishes,
Rick

bdorman
09-16-2013, 01:20 PM
In one-pocket both the break and the shot after the break have the potential to determine the tenor (and possibly the outcome) of the game. But just as often both of the shots are "the usual" routine shots...and we have to wait until later in the game for a pivotal shot.

The great thing about watching one-pocket is that one player will make a fantastic shot...and the other player will answer with an equally fantastic shot (there's a Shannon Dalton vs. Efren Reyes video on youtube that has more unbelievable shots in one game than most other matches have in their entire match!).

I guess the same can be said for any game that invovles a safety battle. I just enjoy one-pocket because "safe" is an element of almost every shot.

When I play, any shot that goes in AND gets position for the next shot is THE SHOT :D

Johnnyt
09-16-2013, 01:25 PM
There is "the shot" in almost every match/game. Most of the time that shot is a miss. Johnnyt

prad
09-16-2013, 01:41 PM
This is what i think :-
9 ball :- break shot, and making the 9.
10 ball:- break shot, and making the 10.

I think in straight pool every shot is important (the game will punish you for positional errors), its about planning and even if the game looks simple there is "certain way" to play it.

CreeDo
09-16-2013, 02:34 PM
In 9 ball and 10 ball, there are two "the shot"s that come up all the time:

- Very often you are looking at a sketchy, difficult 1 ball. A long thing cut or something.
So many games are lost on someone either taking a flyer at it and hanging it... or trying a weak safe
and selling out some barely makeable shot.

- It seems like half of the time, getting from the 2nd-to-last ball to the game ball in 9/10b is a risky shot.
Like the 8 ball is on the head spot and the 9b just below the foot spot or something. To get good and straight on the 9 you must travel a few rails and possibly risk getting stuck on the rail or scratching in the side. I always feel like that shot needs a little extra time.

victorl
09-16-2013, 04:01 PM
There is no one shot because each rack is different. The "shot" is usually the toughest shot in the rack, or the one that opens up the rest of the rack to be run. It could be a combination, a breakout, a shot that requires pinpoint shape, or even a well-played safety. For great players, the key shot is often the first shot of a run because once they get in line, the runout is near automatic.

sunnyone
09-18-2013, 09:13 AM
The great thing about watching one-pocket is that one player will make a fantastic shot...and the other player will answer with an equally fantastic shot (there's a Shannon Dalton vs. Efren Reyes video on youtube that has more unbelievable shots in one game than most other matches have in their entire match!).



A beaux I used to know and I bought a loft in Soho. It came with a billiards table (because the seller didn’t have room in his new place) and that’s how I became interested in the sport. One of the very first vids I watched was that one in Galveston. (Which is when Efren became my innamorato!)

It was an amazing intro to one-pocket -- which immediately became my favorite game -- and I replayed several of the shots several times.

The only downside? The announcer was a bit sketchy, wasn’t he? Don’t remember his name, but the poor chap was hardly up to the task, was he? Also … sort of a degenerate tone of voice, although that could be my own subjective reaction.



Someone inquired about my online persona. My avatar is, of course, the actress Myrna Loy. My mom and dad have a TV and sometimes my mom and I watch the ‘Thin Man’ movies when one of the stations runs a bunch of them. Nick and Nora always reminded me of my parents -- urban and urbane -- but I’m prejudiced!

My forum name, Sunnyone, swam into focus because ‘Sunny’ wasn’t available. I’ve been called Sunny from childhood … I admit to a positive, perhaps naively so, attitude toward life!

Elucidation is my life,

Sunny