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haifp
01-15-2014, 06:47 PM
is it just me or does it bother anyone else when your opponent takes a long time to take his shots. I've read in a few places that this is bad etiquette.

madhatter44
01-15-2014, 06:56 PM
I only play slow when it really bothers my opponent.

Just kidding...

staypuff578
01-15-2014, 06:58 PM
I usually don't mind unless they are intentionally doing it.

Lesh
01-15-2014, 07:05 PM
Well it's their time at the table, they better make it count bc if they screw up it's likely the last time they get to do it. I shoot in a league with LOTS of elder statesmen in it. They like to review the lay of the land and get their bearings so they can align the parabolic mean and accellerate adequately along the medial axis of the quadrahelial flummoxial squabblduhigglianus and floobity-boobity the snaggwhongdillios. So just hold on there young feller and try to learn something.

Fine... ok siddown and try not to fart dust on my case.

BING! OUT!!

Lesh

Rackemep
01-15-2014, 07:22 PM
I TRY not to think about how slow my opponent is playing...I shoot with a couple of guys that play slow...One is in a wheelchair and it obviously takes him some extra time to get around the table to look at shots and then get into position to take the shot. I totally understand and enjoy shooting with him. <----- He has taught me a great lesson in patience.

The other slow guy will look at a shot forever then get down and take 15-20 practice strokes (really 15-20...I've counted them, granted they are quick jerky strokes)...Then he'll jump up out of his shot and look some more...Then get back down and take 15-20 practice strokes and shoot. He doesn't do it as a sharking technique or anything its just one of those little quirks that the guy has...I can tell when he's shooting good just by how many strokes he takes...If he's doing the 15-20 practice strokes he's off and will talk/think him self right out of making the shot but, when he cuts it down to 3-5 practice strokes he gets himself into a decent rhythm and may get out...

I cant shoot slow...I have to get into a rhythm in order to get rolling....Now if I get in a jam that requires more than my normal thought process then I will take the time needed to be confident or at least comfortable with my shot....

FairladyZ
01-15-2014, 08:10 PM
I cant shoot slow...I have to get into a rhythm in order to get rolling....Now if I get in a jam that requires more than my normal thought process then I will take the time needed to be confident or at least comfortable with my shot....
Yup. Once I get into a rhythm, my consistency goes way up....If that rhythm is broken or I'm just having a bad day, I'll start rushing shots out of frustration....that's when I know its time to step back, take a deep breath, and regroup my thoughts. Someone shooting deliberately slow to be an annoyance, that I have to say would be one of my biggest pet-peeves.

Black-Balled
01-16-2014, 06:06 AM
I have only been bothered to the point that I would call significant twice, once by a friend who was giving me an ass whuppin, though he couldn't win with the 8 and we were playing tourney match/ even.

The othe was Jeremy jones. I don't recall what the race was to, but he was in no danger of losing! As you might imagine, he stayed in line the whole time and the last few games, had shoot/ stop outs, but he had to walk around, get down get up, use a towel, suck a cig, use a towel, get some powder, look at the shot some more, use a towel...and it was far more painful than reading the past few lines, trust me.

My opinion and attitude that I try to maintain is tha I don't shoot until I am ready, why should I expect to be able to dictate to others when the should be ready to pull ye olde trigger?

osama
01-16-2014, 06:12 AM
I only get frustrated when my opponent is texting on his phone instead of making the shot. :angry:

oldplayer
01-16-2014, 06:13 AM
I have played some opponents (thank goodness not many) that are so slow that they seem to be frozen in time and I want to get out a surveyors transit to see if they are actually moving!

Black-Balled
01-16-2014, 06:18 AM
I heard an old timer yell 'pawn to knight 7!' At his opponent once.

I got no chess smarts, but I found it damn funny.

j_zippel
01-16-2014, 06:31 AM
I heard an old timer yell 'pawn to knight 7!' At his opponent once.

I got no chess smarts, but I found it damn funny.

i don't know what that even means but i laughed

CokerFan82
01-16-2014, 07:09 AM
I only get frustrated when my opponent is texting on his phone instead of making the shot. :angry:

I absolutely refuse to spend my table time watching a guy play w/ his phone. It's just about as bad as deliberate sharing in my opinion!

JBB2388
01-16-2014, 07:53 AM
Definitely bothers me. Not to the point that it affects my game though. I play APA 8-Ball and this past Tuesday night i unfortunately had to wait and play the last match of the night and didn't even start it until 1:40am. The first 4 matches took over 6 and a half hours to play. Mostly because of idiots that can't play and take 5 minutes between every shot because they are out of position every time. Oh well. One of the many drawbacks of playing in the APA.

CreeDo
01-16-2014, 08:04 AM
I don't mind naturally slow/fidgety. But if they appear to be overanalyzing
a simple situation (stop shot, shop shot) I might lose patience and say
"err, can't you just do a stop shot here?".
Of if it's a friend, a more sarcastic "you want me to draw you a diagram?"

I only recently realized how frustrating it is, dealing with people on their phones.

I used to be one of them! But I figured out it's extremely irritating to have
to keep saying. "Your turn to shoot. You're up. Your shot."
It's just rude. It's worse than slow play, it's no-play.
As in, they're not even playing pool. They're dicking around on the phone
and pool is just a temporary chore to deal with.

Now I try to put my phone away (even if I'm bored to death waiting on my turn).

Cdryden
01-16-2014, 08:14 AM
If the situation calls for it I don't mind a bit. I used to play very fast, my instructor slowed me down and now I see where I made a lot of mistakes. If a persons routine is a bit on the slow side I understand. When they are slow due to being distracted when it is their shot I don't like it.

If you are continuously on the phone, talking to someone else, taking smoke breaks, etc, I feel that it showing a lack of respect for your opponent and the game. I wont split table time with these types...why should I pay for them to be on the phone?

Devils Advocate: Is it bad etiquette to rush a slow player?

jrackman
01-16-2014, 08:20 AM
Well it's their time at the table, they better make it count bc if they screw up it's likely the last time they get to do it. I shoot in a league with LOTS of elder statesmen in it. They like to review the lay of the land and get their bearings so they can align the parabolic mean and accellerate adequately along the medial axis of the quadrahelial flummoxial squabblduhigglianus and floobity-boobity the snaggwhongdillios. So just hold on there young feller and try to learn something.

Fine... ok siddown and try not to fart dust on my case.

BING! OUT!!

Leshlmao... so kid listen to Lesh and it will be ok, I think?

West Point 1987
01-16-2014, 08:33 AM
Some (most, I think) players are rhythm players...I know I am. Some are not, and each shot is considered and re-considered as its own individual thing. Doesn't have to be slow, but often is, especially if they're under some pressure. Even some top players spend A LOT of time walking around the table, looking at the shot from every angle, resetting, going to the table for a towel or talc, chalking again, etc. As good as Alex P is, I just can't watch him play...about the third time he walks around the table I change the channel. Charlie Williams is another guy I don't have the patience to watch.

The problem with rhythm players, though, is it can be easy to get knocked out of that rhythm and then it's a chore to get it back. The deliberate players seem to get it back easier if the wheels fall off.

Matt
01-16-2014, 08:39 AM
Slow play detracts from my enjoyment of the game, but I can tolerate slow players so long as they seem like they are doing something related to taking the shot. If my opponent is doing something totally unrelated, I consider it disrespectful. Unfortunately, I have a bad habit of not saying anything and letting it irritate me and take my mind off the game, so I am trying to make it a point to let me opponent know if I think they are out of line. Maybe they'll stop, maybe they won't, but at least I will have said something and can quit wondering whether they are doing it on purpose or not.

randyg
01-16-2014, 09:08 AM
In a Tournament you just call in the "shot clock" judge.

randyg

BobTfromIL
01-16-2014, 09:15 AM
There's one player down here who's so slow it takes him 5 minutes to get his stick
out of his case. This guy will probably live to be 140.

Jude Rosenstock
01-16-2014, 09:25 AM
From the player perspective, you can't let slow-play bother you. If you compete a lot, you're going to find yourself in important matches that don't have a shot-clock. I enjoy competing in 9/10-ball, 8ball and 14.1 and I really only encounter shot-clocks when playing 9 or 10ball. In fact, during the Amateur 8ball BCA Championships, it was routine for many of my opponents to look over the table for a few minutes before beginning their turn.

How do I feel? In the beginning, it bothered me immensely. I regard myself as a rhythm player and felt they were breaking my rhythm. But, I'm also VERY competitive and have a strong desire to continue improving and the only way you can do that is to take ownership of your mistakes. When you blame your opponent for your own bad play, you're not taking responsibility. "I played like shit because the guy plays like a turtle!" That's really not an excuse.

Now, if you want to talk about slow-play from the TD's perspective, that's something else. Some organizers are very cognizant of this, less experienced ones obviously are less so. When you are running a tournament, you always have a set number of hours to complete it. You shouldn't look at a field and say, "Oh, I've got 47 guys, 20 tables, I should need about 2 days to complete this." It should be more precise. You should know that you need to complete exactly 15 rounds. The poolroom has granted you 24 hours of use on 20 tables which gives you exactly 75 minutes for each round (I'm not really doing the math). This means, if the first round takes 90 minutes to complete, you have a problem. If you can isolate that problem, great. It's a lot easier when you can point at one guy and say, "Speed it up". If he gets eliminated, problem solved. Otherwise, in a time-constrained situation (very common), it's important to be on top of slow-play and to encourage players to complete their matches quickly.

West Point 1987
01-16-2014, 09:31 AM
This is a good point about TD control...I've played in tournaments where the TD is on top of things and gets matches started on time, and I've played where the match is announced, the players agree to go for a 30 minute smoke break, then agree to allow each other a rack to guage the table, etc. Then they take liberal breaks during the match. Tables are getting turned over all around them, but their glacial pace holds the whole bracket up.

Jude Rosenstock
01-16-2014, 09:49 AM
This is a good point about TD control...I've played in tournaments where the TD is on top of things and gets matches started on time, and I've played where the match is announced, the players agree to go for a 30 minute smoke break, then agree to allow each other a rack to guage the table, etc. Then they take liberal breaks during the match. Tables are getting turned over all around them, but their glacial pace holds the whole bracket up.

Yeah, breaks have been commonplace ever since smoking was banned in poolrooms (most states, at least). At the time, I think there was a majority of pool players that were against the smoking ban and "the break" was seen as a reasonable compromise. It really was a horrible idea and one that needs to go.