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View Full Version : DCC Straight pool is coming up - Stuart Pettman 117 Compressed down to 20:33


elvicash
01-18-2014, 10:13 AM
Stuart Pettman runs 117 at the 2013 DCC 14.1 Challenge. Compressed down to 20:33 so the video is basically only Stuart going into his stance, shooting and the balls rolling. All of the scouting and planning were removed to make the shooting and patterns jump out. Great shooting Stuart. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Je5f...ature=youtu.be

Come to the Derby and see some of the best straight pool players in the world. Give it a try 12 attempts for a $100. We have over $7500 added this year and we pay it all out. The best play and they get paid. this year we are back on the 9' Diamonds. Also this year we have a new name The "George Fels Memorial Straight Pool Challenge" to honor George Fels who passed away on December 31, 2013. Watch or participate if at the event look for streaming from Inside Pool. Thanks for checking out this video.

Let me know if you like the compressed format.

Williebetmore
01-18-2014, 11:02 AM
Dangit. "That video does not exist".

I want to see it though.

Bob Jewett
01-18-2014, 11:24 AM
Here is the link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Je5faff3uvc

I do like the compressed format, but it's got to be an awful lot of work.

MahnaMahna
01-18-2014, 11:54 AM
Love the compressed format!

What a great run.

Just out of curiosity:

-what size pockets?

-can you tell us about the player? Where is he from, what's his high run, etc?

Great job, thanks!

krychekrowe
01-18-2014, 12:56 PM
Does he have some sort of marking on his shaft? Anyone have any info?


Best regards

DGilb147
01-18-2014, 01:34 PM
Love the compressed format!

What a great run.

Just out of curiosity:

-what size pockets?

-can you tell us about the player? Where is he from, what's his high run, etc?

Great job, thanks!

Ex English snooker pro - probably first time he has played 14-1

Nostroke
01-18-2014, 01:37 PM
Im pretty sure DAZ said he was the best potter on earth. I think he lives in Thailand now.

Bob Jewett
01-18-2014, 10:40 PM
....
-can you tell us about the player? Where is he from, what's his high run, etc?

...
He has an autobiography out about his time on the snooker tour. It's very interesting to see how that's organized.

Cameron Smith
01-19-2014, 01:16 AM
Does he have some sort of marking on his shaft? Anyone have any info?


Best regards

I can't speak for Stuart, however I do know some snooker players will mark their shaft where their bridge hand should be, and some will also place marker where their grip had should be. together this would provide a consistent bridge length and ensure your arm is at a 90 degree angle rather than slightly forward or behind.

DGilb147
01-19-2014, 01:29 AM
I can't speak for Stuart, however I do know some snooker players will mark their shaft where their bridge hand should be, and some will also place marker where their grip had should be. together this would provide a consistent bridge length and ensure your arm is at a 90 degree angle rather than slightly forward or behind.

Yes although it is not so clear with Stuarts cue as to what the markings represent.
It does seem to indicate the length of follow through.
Marco Fu was one player that did mark their cue.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ihZh4DpG8k

DGilb147
01-19-2014, 01:33 AM
can someone clarify it was suggested that the run of 117 on a 10ft table is a world record
is this correct?

I am fully aware of Mosconi's run on a 8ft table

victorl
01-19-2014, 04:45 AM
I met him a few times in Thailand. He runs a pool hall in Bangkok called Hustlers.
I believe he had only played straight pool a couple of times before running 117 at DCC, and played a lot of unorthodox snooker patterns. His main games are snooker, 9 ball and 10 ball and he is a monster at all those games.
When I first saw him, I was like man, this guy's the straightest shooter I've ever seen, anywhere. Then I watched him destroy Mika Immonen playing 10 ball when Mika made a stop in Thailand and realized he was the real deal.

By the way, the spot on his cue he always keeps it facing up to make sure that the shaft is always facing the same direction for radial consistency. Snooker cues have an indent at the butt to keep track of it, but pool cues don't.

victorl
01-19-2014, 04:48 AM
can someone clarify it was suggested that the run of 117 on a 10ft table is a world record
is this correct?

I am fully aware of Mosconi's run on a 8ft table

The "world record" refers to the highest verified (i.e. videotaped) straight pool run on a 10-foot table.

macguy
01-19-2014, 06:51 AM
Here is the link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Je5faff3uvc

I do like the compressed format, but it's got to be an awful lot of work.
He seemed to have to come with quite a few tough shots and went blindly into clusters numerous times getting luckily with one makable shot. I say this with all due respect, for that run I would rather see it uncut to get a sense of his thinking as he was playing.

On first look it looks like he doesn't know what he is doing and is surviving through luck and his shot making. When he finally missed it caught up with him the way he played the last few balls. You can see the three balls in line in the cluster that are going to be like hitting a wall. He had a number of ways to open that cluster with the balls that were open and he chose about the worst one. That is why I say I would like to see it unedited to see if he looked at anything else and what his thinking was.

Having said that I know he is primarily a snooker player. When I was in Europe in the 80's I played quite a few snooker players 9 ball and they often cinched balls and didn't even seem to play position they were so confident in their shot making on what to them was an easy pool table.

sjm
01-19-2014, 07:16 AM
Reproduced from my post in the 14.1 forum:

Pretty interesting run. Obviously, Pettman's end patterns are far from classic, but I saw so many things I liked, and which pool players should take note of:

1) Pettman's skill in playing shape when he was forced to run into balls during the rack was exquisite, a snooker skill that translates well to 14.1.

2) Pettman's speed control was very impressive and his cueing was rock solid, snooker skills that translate well to 14.1.

3) On the break shots at the beginning of the rack, with just one exception, Pettman's attack angles into the rack were solid and he hit the break shots with authority.

Still, what impressed me the most was something that's very subtle and is often overlooked by viewers of 14.1 - Pettman's cue ball practically never ended up anywhere near a rail! This is a common attribute among both top snooker players and the most elite 14.1 players and it's definitely much harder to accomplish than it might seem. I would urge developing players in 14.1 to take note of this.

Nice run. Thanks for sharing.

elvicash
01-19-2014, 07:37 AM
Here is the link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Je5faff3uvc

I do like the compressed format, but it's got to be an awful lot of work.

Hey Bob we miss you at the Derby. I would like to thank you again for getting the challenge started and putting the money up for a number of years. You deserve to be recognized for being a big part of the interest coming back to straight pool. I travel alot for work and I find people playing it as I travel around and that was not really true for a number of years especially in the mid-west.

As to the work it was not that bad, my problem was I think I doing it 3 times, I had to convert to a format my editor could edit as my my digital camera was not easily used directly. Halfway though I felt my converted video quality was not good enough, then my project appeared to be corrupted but I finally got a handle on it. I think I could do it now in perhaps 3-4 hours per hour of actual play time. I think I will try to do some runs this year at the Derby while I am onsite perhaps get 2 or 3 runs up quickly in this compressed format.

He seemed to have to come with quite a few tough shots and went blindly into clusters numerous times getting luckily with one makable shot. I say this with all due respect, for that run I would rather see it uncut to get a sense of his thinking as he was playing.

On first look it looks like he doesn't know what he is doing and is surviving through luck and his shot making. When he finally missed it caught up with him the way he played the last few balls. You can see the three balls in line in the cluster that are going to be like hitting a wall. He had a number of ways to open that cluster with the balls that were open and he chose about the worst one. That is why I say I would like to see it unedited to see if he looked at anything else and what his thinking was.

Having said that I know he is primarily a snooker player. When I was in Europe in the 80's I played quite a few snooker players 9 ball and they often cinched balls and didn't even seem to play position they were so confident in their shot making on what to them was an easy pool table.

You can see the run in a mixed run tape here from the Inside Pool stream, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZvQSmvfbHWg The miss at the end occurs around 2:15:22 I am sure the entire run is not captured as the stream was not focused on that table the entire time there were 2 tables going. I would think the entire runs was well more than an hour long, I thought this format would be nice as the actual flow of the run is much easier to see and IU like the result, I considered trimming to only the last single stroke and I think this format including building the stance looks really good is very watchable. I might post the entire run if there was interest.

Cornerman
01-19-2014, 07:56 AM
Hey Bob we miss you at the Derby. I would like to thank you again for getting the challenge started and putting the money up for a number of years. You deserve to be recognized for being a big part of the interest coming back to straight pool. I travel alot for work and I find people playing it as I travel around and that was not really true for a number of years especially in the mid-west.

As to the work it was not that bad, my problem was I think I doing it 3 times, I had to convert to a format my editor could edit as my my digital camera was not easily used directly. Halfway though I felt my converted video quality was not good enough, then my project appeared to be corrupted but I finally got a handle on it. I think I could do it now in perhaps 3-4 hours per hour of actual play time. I think I will try to do some runs this year at the Derby while I am onsite perhaps get 2 or 3 runs up quickly in this compressed format.



You can see the run in a mixed run tape here from the Inside Pool stream, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZvQSmvfbHWg The miss at the end occurs around 2:15:22 I am sure the entire run is not captured as the stream was not focused on that table the entire time there were 2 tables going. I would think the entire runs was well more than an hour long, I thought this format would be nice as the actual flow of the run is much easier to see and IU like the result, I considered trimming to only the last single stroke and I think this format including building the stance looks really good is very watchable. I might post the entire run if there was interest.
I'm pretty sure the whole run was captured. But, I've been wrong before. Once Stuart started, I don't believe we switched over. He starts right around 1hr09m

I apologize for some of the seemingly uneducated commentating. Even when I watch it today I think I must have been blind or high.

Freddie <~~~ or both

MCP
01-19-2014, 08:26 AM
Nice job editing after a while you don't even notice the cut.
MCP

sfleinen
01-19-2014, 08:54 AM
I met him a few times in Thailand. He runs a pool hall in Bangkok called Hustlers.
I believe he had only played straight pool a couple of times before running 117 at DCC, and played a lot of unorthodox snooker patterns. His main games are snooker, 9 ball and 10 ball and he is a monster at all those games.
When I first saw him, I was like man, this guy's the straightest shooter I've ever seen, anywhere. Then I watched him destroy Mika Immonen playing 10 ball when Mika made a stop in Thailand and realized he was the real deal.

By the way, the spot on his cue he always keeps it facing up to make sure that the shaft is always facing the same direction for radial consistency. Snooker cues have an indent at the butt to keep track of it, but pool cues don't.

I agree with the bolded. Reproduced from my post in the 14.1 forum:

As I watch the video again, it's helpful to notice the following:

1. The black mark is indeed just a spot on one side of the shaft. Its not a "ring" that goes all the way around the circumference of the shaft, which would be the case if he didn't care about the orientation of the wood and is just using it as a bridge-length indicator.

2. On some shots, you can see that where the spot is, it also seems to be the demarcation point where, in a pro taper, the pretty-much-straight-part of the shaft ends, and the conical taper begins. Stu might've killed two birds with one stone, in not only marking the "keel" of the quarter-sawn maple, but also the beginning of the conical taper part of the pro taper.

I feel pretty sure of the "keel-marker" reasons for #1. #2 is conjecture on my part.

-Sean

While the "bridge-length" reasons could be valid, knowing how fanatical many snooker players are about their cue orientation, it makes sense that a spot on one side-only of the shaft (and not a ring around the circumference) is for grain-orientation purposes.

-Sean

BeiberLvr
01-19-2014, 09:01 AM
I agree with the bolded. Reproduced from my post in the 14.1 forum:



While the "bridge-length" reasons could be valid, knowing how fanatical many snooker players are about their cue orientation, it makes sense that a spot on one side-only of the shaft (and not a ring around the circumference) is for grain-orientation purposes.

-Sean



Are there any actual benefits to doing what Pettman does?

macguy
01-19-2014, 10:24 AM
Hey Bob we miss you at the Derby. I would like to thank you again for getting the challenge started and putting the money up for a number of years. You deserve to be recognized for being a big part of the interest coming back to straight pool. I travel alot for work and I find people playing it as I travel around and that was not really true for a number of years especially in the mid-west.

As to the work it was not that bad, my problem was I think I doing it 3 times, I had to convert to a format my editor could edit as my my digital camera was not easily used directly. Halfway though I felt my converted video quality was not good enough, then my project appeared to be corrupted but I finally got a handle on it. I think I could do it now in perhaps 3-4 hours per hour of actual play time. I think I will try to do some runs this year at the Derby while I am onsite perhaps get 2 or 3 runs up quickly in this compressed format.



You can see the run in a mixed run tape here from the Inside Pool stream, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZvQSmvfbHWg The miss at the end occurs around 2:15:22 I am sure the entire run is not captured as the stream was not focused on that table the entire time there were 2 tables going. I would think the entire runs was well more than an hour long, I thought this format would be nice as the actual flow of the run is much easier to see and IU like the result, I considered trimming to only the last single stroke and I think this format including building the stance looks really good is very watchable. I might post the entire run if there was interest.

Thanks for the link I just watched it. It is really more enjoyable watching in real time then fast forward. I have to say, I was a little hesitant to make my earlier comments regarding his play. When I watched the full match with commentary who ever those guys were commenting, they were really brutal. At points they were making fun of him and laughing at the way he played.

DGilb147
01-19-2014, 11:30 AM
The "world record" refers to the highest verified (i.e. videotaped) straight pool run on a 10-foot table.

Many thanks i thought it was a record , i watched this on you tube (inside pool) Many months ago and they made some mention of it being a world record.

Bob Jewett
01-19-2014, 12:57 PM
Many thanks i thought it was a record , i watched this on you tube (inside pool) Many months ago and they made some mention of it being a world record.
Copied from another thread:

The record in tournament play on a 5x10 is by Joe Procita: 182 in 1954 against Mosconi.

Irving Crane was the first to run over 300 on a 5x10 in exhibition: 309 in Logan Utah in 1939.

Mosconi ran 309 in exhibition in 1945, then 322 (April 22, 1953, Platteville, Wisconsin) and 365 (November 13, 1953, Wilmington, North Carolina). It's not clear which of these exhibition runs was on a 5x10, although the 309 probably was. Mosconi comments in his biography that the 365 started with him breaking the head ball into the side pocket, so his opponent had no shot during the game except the lag. The run took "more than an hour and a half."

A high run of 355 is also listed for Mosconi in 1953 but without any other information and Mosconi does not mention it in his biography.

The longest run in any cue sport discipline was by Tom Reece in 1907 at English Billiards: 499,135 (unfinished). That was on a 6x12 table, but Tom was not using much of the table.

sfleinen
01-19-2014, 02:23 PM
Are there any actual benefits to doing what Pettman does?

With the black dot on the shaft, you mean? If he's using a laminated shaft, no benefit at all, other than to satisfy the subconscious "must orient shaft 'this' way" hankering that snooker practitioners have.

If, on the other hand, he's using plain maple shafts, there could be a radial-consistency benefit, much like what Meucci did with their Red Dot shaft product (i.e. putting a red dot on the shaft, that if positioned face-up, guaranteed left-right radial consistency, because it was tested on their robot at the factory).

Irrespective of all this, I think it's a great result he achieves -- even if only to satisfy his subconscious.

-Sean

DGilb147
01-19-2014, 02:25 PM
Copied from another thread:

The record in tournament play on a 5x10 is by Joe Procita: 182 in 1954 against Mosconi.

Irving Crane was the first to run over 300 on a 5x10 in exhibition: 309 in Logan Utah in 1939.

Mosconi ran 309 in exhibition in 1945, then 322 (April 22, 1953, Platteville, Wisconsin) and 365 (November 13, 1953, Wilmington, North Carolina). It's not clear which of these exhibition runs was on a 5x10, although the 309 probably was. Mosconi comments in his biography that the 365 started with him breaking the head ball into the side pocket, so his opponent had no shot during the game except the lag. The run took "more than an hour and a half."

A high run of 355 is also listed for Mosconi in 1953 but without any other information and Mosconi does not mention it in his biography.

The longest run in any cue sport discipline was by Tom Reece in 1907 at English Billiards: 499,135 (unfinished). That was on a 6x12 table, but Tom was not using much of the table.

Thanks for the information on 14-1 . Tom Reece's break helped to ruin English billiards as a spectators sport, mind you it took skill to manoeuvre and wedge the two balls into the pocket to play nursery cannons from.

victorl
01-19-2014, 06:36 PM
I agree, I don't see much benefit to consistent shaft orientation, but I could be wrong. It's a big thing in snooker, but has never really caught on in pool.
He just shoots so damn well that it made me want to try it too.
By the way, Pettman was using a Predator shaft the last time I saw him.