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Jeff
07-01-2006, 10:22 AM
I saw the strangest thing the other night. Playing in a league match and this guy gets his break stick out and then gets this glove out and puts it on.

The glove looks funny and later on I find out it is a glove with weights attached that you can buy for exercising. I think you can add weight to it also. The thing must weight 5 pounds,

Anyway, he says the rules say you can't use a break stick over a certain weight but they don't say anything about a glove. I gotta say he smashed the balls.

What do you think, against the rules? Any thing to it as far as breaking?

unknownpro
07-01-2006, 10:28 AM
I saw the strangest thing the other night. Playing in a league match and this guy gets his break stick out and then gets this glove out and puts it on.

The glove looks funny and later on I find out it is a glove with weights attached that you can buy for exercising. I think you can add weight to it also. The thing must weight 5 pounds,

Anyway, he says the rules say you can't use a break stick over a certain weight but they don't say anything about a glove. I gotta say he smashed the balls.

What do you think, against the rules? Any thing to it as far as breaking?
I don't think it'll help get more break speed, but it could help lessen the impact on your arm and shoulder. I may try that myself. I've never seen a rule against it.

unknownpro

phjunky
07-01-2006, 10:32 AM
I never heard of that, sounds funny, but interesting.

branpureza
07-01-2006, 10:39 AM
that's ridiculous... does that mean that people with really fat (heavy) hands can break harder than people with bony hands?

Jeff
07-01-2006, 10:48 AM
that's ridiculous... does that mean that people with really fat (heavy) hands can break harder than people with bony hands?

E = (1/2) mass × speed (squared)

I imagine the more weight you add, the less your speed will be but at what point does one outdo the other. Does adding weight decrease your speed enough to actually decrease the impact? Any one ever seen a study on this?

ATH
07-01-2006, 10:55 AM
Hehe people do funny things, i personally found that changing my old break cue to a lighter cue helped my break a lot. The lighter cue gave me more control and speed, it felt easier to propel the cue into the CB.

sixpack
07-01-2006, 12:43 PM
E = (1/2) mass × speed (squared)

I imagine the more weight you add, the less your speed will be but at what point does one outdo the other. Does adding weight decrease your speed enough to actually decrease the impact? Any one ever seen a study on this?

I've seen a study on this.

Basically, if you're a small, quick person, you can achieve higher speed with a lighter cue. If you're a stronger, slower person, your speed tops out anyway, so then you need to start adding weight. If you're stronger, the addition of the weight doesn't cause enough of a speed loss to more than offset the weight addition.

I've tried both, I think I break a little better with a lighter cue, but if I don't feel like swinging hard, I'll grab a heavier house cue and swing a little easier.

Cheers,
RC

td873
07-01-2006, 01:31 PM
E = (1/2) mass × speed (squared)
Any one ever seen a study on this?

There are a number of threads on this, some going back a few years. The short answer typically is -> since speed is an exponential increase and mass is a linear increase, increasing speed has a more dramatic affect than increasing mass.

In practice, however, it is difficult to quantify and measure anything other than cue ball velocity, which may be affected by more variables than just cue stick weight/speed. For example, there is a lengthy discussion (somewhere) about tip compression between leather and synthetic affecting break speed.


-td

branpureza
07-01-2006, 03:29 PM
E = (1/2) mass × speed (squared)

I imagine the more weight you add, the less your speed will be but at what point does one outdo the other. Does adding weight decrease your speed enough to actually decrease the impact? Any one ever seen a study on this?


the weight of a glove you're wearing has nothing to do with how much your cue weighs... if you think wearing a 5 pound glove is the same as adding 5 pounds to your cue then try attaching that weight to your cue and breaking with that. that whole mass times speed squared thing is nice and all but it only applies to the poolcue.. not whats propelling it.

Jeff
07-01-2006, 03:48 PM
the weight of a glove you're wearing has nothing to do with how much your cue weighs... if you think wearing a 5 pound glove is the same as adding 5 pounds to your cue then try attaching that weight to your cue and breaking with that. that whole mass times speed squared thing is nice and all but it only applies to the poolcue.. not whats propelling it.

You may have a point if you were swinging the cue like a hammer but when the cue is moving straight forward, the hand and any weight attached to the hand becomes part of the driving force,

What's the difference between having two lead bars taped around the butt of the cue and having that same weight attached to the hand holding the butt.

branpureza
07-01-2006, 04:13 PM
well i can see the logic in that but a 5 pound weight is ridiculous... there's no way you can generate a decent amount of cue speed. that's like a baseball player trying to bat with one of those donuts still on the bat.

PoolSleuth
07-01-2006, 04:17 PM
What do you think, against the rules?

Against the Rules.....NOPE :)