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Varney Cues
07-09-2006, 10:05 AM
Well we all now know about the cues made in China. But you guys won't believe this...again from a very reliable source in the industry. I've known for quite a while that the Valley house cues are now made in China, says so on the sticker. Used to you could see huge differences in the woods used on the Valleys, even a few purpleheart and such. And they had the old fiber ferrules too. Now they all look the same, brown wood, and have plastic ferrules. Often the points are "painted" to try and even them up and weight bolts are often not centered causing them to "hop" as they roll. Sticker says "made in China"...guess where they are really made? Go ahead and guess...I'll give you ten tries...LOL!
The cues are made on a ship on the way here from China. Thats right, made on a boat. Seems for some tax/duty/tariff whatever reasons...they deemed it cheaper to actually make the cues on a ship. So if you are a big U.S. distributor and order some cases of Valley bar cues...they fire up the ship and they are constructed in route. What next?

rackem
07-09-2006, 12:02 PM
Actually the way I have heard it is. The cues that are being made in China are not made with Chineese wood. The wood is shipped to China. While the wood is on the way to China the manufacturing process begins. That's right there are milling machines on the boats. The blanks are being cut as the wood is on the way to China. As far as the product being finished on the way back, I find that hard to believe.

JoeyInCali
07-09-2006, 12:16 PM
They've been making them for a while.
From what I understand a foreign ship buys the maple logs then cuts them right there on the ship. Bypassing US tax and labor laws then ships the boards to China on the same boat.
Edwin Bandido can shed more light to this rumor.

onepocketchump
07-09-2006, 07:08 PM
Well we all now know about the cues made in China. But you guys won't believe this...again from a very reliable source in the industry. I've known for quite a while that the Valley house cues are now made in China, says so on the sticker. Used to you could see huge differences in the woods used on the Valleys, even a few purpleheart and such. And they had the old fiber ferrules too. Now they all look the same, brown wood, and have plastic ferrules. Often the points are "painted" to try and even them up and weight bolts are often not centered causing them to "hop" as they roll. Sticker says "made in China"...guess where they are really made? Go ahead and guess...I'll give you ten tries...LOL!
The cues are made on a ship on the way here from China. Thats right, made on a boat. Seems for some tax/duty/tariff whatever reasons...they deemed it cheaper to actually make the cues on a ship. So if you are a big U.S. distributor and order some cases of Valley bar cues...they fire up the ship and they are constructed in route. What next?

You are out of your mind. I don't believe this for a second. There is NO DUTY AT ALL for pool cues so there is no reason to "make them on a ship" even if that were true.

Also, even if the cue were made at sea, who cares? The US Navy maintains a precision machine shop on every large ship that can produce high end machine parts in high seas. Where does my info come from? A Navy machinist with 12 years of service.

Quit being a mudslinger.

John

Sometimes I really wonder about you Kevin.

Do you have any proof of this or is something you heard from some other loony nut job?

smittie1984
07-09-2006, 07:32 PM
I believe that's also why they only cost $6 each at retail. If your a pool hall and your sticks always get destroyed it's not a bad idea to have those.

Now for my political side. I believe if we were to adopt a consumption tax compared to an income tax and eliminate tariffs on imports than many of these manufactures would come here because America would be the world's most biggest and most powerful tax haven.

Varney Cues
07-09-2006, 07:33 PM
Do you have any proof of this or is something you heard from some other loony nut job?

No one here cares about your Navy time. I guess since you work for Fury you have all the answers. I'll too be sure and tell them you called them "loony nut jobs"...this was only told to me by the mgr. of Brady Dist. The largest distributor of Valley products in the area. A poolroom owner was waiting for their shipment of new Valley house cues and what I said was explained as the reason. I don't believe a man in his postion has any reason to fabricate that and pass it along to his customers.
You should check facts before you start name calling.

Timberly
07-09-2006, 07:58 PM
They're house cues, not "custom" cues. The majority of the folks that use them don't have the 1st clue how to respect a cue. They bang them on the edges of the table when they miss, they drop them, burn them with cigarettes, play swords... I could care less if they're made on a ship. If I were a pool room owner, I would be grateful for anything they do to defray the cost of something that I must have and something that is going to be abused as they are.

John did make a good point....There are very well run precision machine shops run on ships all over the ocean. If the US Navy trusts these shops to do repairs on the fighter jets that are docked on these ships, I don't think I'm going to lose too much sleep because the house cues at my local pool hall were built on a ship. :p

strtshtr
07-09-2006, 08:20 PM
Well we all now know about the cues made in China. But you guys won't believe this...again from a very reliable source in the industry. I've known for quite a while that the Valley house cues are now made in China, says so on the sticker. Used to you could see huge differences in the woods used on the Valleys, even a few purpleheart and such. And they had the old fiber ferrules too. Now they all look the same, brown wood, and have plastic ferrules. Often the points are "painted" to try and even them up and weight bolts are often not centered causing them to "hop" as they roll. Sticker says "made in China"...guess where they are really made? Go ahead and guess...I'll give you ten tries...LOL!
The cues are made on a ship on the way here from China. Thats right, made on a boat. Seems for some tax/duty/tariff whatever reasons...they deemed it cheaper to actually make the cues on a ship. So if you are a big U.S. distributor and order some cases of Valley bar cues...they fire up the ship and they are constructed in route. What next?

Sorry. I don't buy this for a second. The costs of manufacturing on board ship are many times what they are on mainland China. This would be an extremely expensive way to manufacture.
Every square foot on board ship is extremely valuable. The amount of space required for storage of raw material, machining, finishing, drying, etc. would all be very costly compared to the same operation on land. These operations would all be occupying valuable space otherwise utilized for freight.
I can think of no logical reason for manufacturing in transit.

unknownpro
07-09-2006, 08:24 PM
I believe that's also why they only cost $6 each at retail. If your a pool hall and your sticks always get destroyed it's not a bad idea to have those.

Now for my political side. I believe if we were to adopt a consumption tax compared to an income tax and eliminate tariffs on imports than many of these manufactures would come here because America would be the world's most biggest and most powerful tax haven.

Why don't we eliminate the income tax and bring back the tariffs we already eliminated? Tariffs were intended by the constitution to be the main source of income for the federal government. The 16th, and the 17th and 18th amendments should have never been passed.

Why should a communist be punished just for being communist when fascists run wild all over Washington? Disclaimer: I am not nor have I ever been associated with the Communist Party!

unknownpro

onepocketchump
07-09-2006, 08:36 PM
No one here cares about your Navy time. I guess since you work for Fury you have all the answers. I'll too be sure and tell them you called them "loony nut jobs"...this was only told to me by the mgr. of Brady Dist. The largest distributor of Valley products in the area. A poolroom owner was waiting for their shipment of new Valley house cues and what I said was explained as the reason. I don't believe a man in his postion has any reason to fabricate that and pass it along to his customers.
You should check facts before you start name calling.

You are such an easy target it's not even fun. My 15 years in the billiard industry involved in all aspects from raw materials sourcing to retail does give me a bit more perspective than a second rate peddler of converted house cues. I don't suppose you have ever considered for a second that your "reliable source" got some bad info himself? So you are saying that your info came from a poolroom owner who heard it from the manager of a local distribution business who heard it from ???? And you have the gall to tell me to check my facts???

Even though you probably have fantasies of being Miss Cleo I doubt that you have even a fraction of her non-existent pyschic abilities. So you can't possibly know how anyone else feels about me or anything I have done. It would help you tremendouly though to practice your reading comprehension so that you could see that my source was someone who was in the Navy and not myself.

Quit being a knock artist who is trying to make himself look good by spreading rumors. Either get your information right or don't say anything. You are starting to look like the Geraldo of pool.

John

shag_fu
07-09-2006, 09:18 PM
I like cheap cues. The ones I have hit good enough to win. They break like a ton o bricks, and I dont care who made them as long as it gets the job done. Sure I have a few decent customs, but I play with my secret asian specials more often than not. And for a few bucks, I dont have to be extra careful in some of those shadier venues we all like to frequent.

Nick B
07-09-2006, 09:37 PM
15 years ago I built (programmed) the a machine that Dufferin used to splice the two pieces that make up the points of the Hi-Run cues. Based on what my machine looked like and the automated machines that spun the shafts and other materials making up these cues I just can't see it.

There is still a lot of manual labour in making even a cheap house cue. Made on a ship...not a chance. These cargo ships are designed and manufactured to ship cargo. Not be rolling factories.

Nick

X Breaker
07-09-2006, 09:43 PM
15 years ago I built (programmed) the a machine that Dufferin used to splice the two pieces that make up the points of the Hi-Run cues. Based on what my machine looked like and the automated machines that spun the shafts and other materials making up these cues I just can't see it.

There is still a lot of manual labour in making even a cheap house cue. Made on a ship...not a chance. These cargo ships are designed and manufactured to ship cargo. Not be rolling factories.

Nick
Nick,

I think what they are trying to say is that the production process starts while the materials are being transported on the ship. The cues are not completely manufactured from scratch to finish on the ship.

Richard

bandido
07-09-2006, 10:24 PM
They've been making them for a while.
From what I understand a foreign ship buys the maple logs then cuts them right there on the ship. Bypassing US tax and labor laws then ships the boards to China on the same boat.
Edwin Bandido can shed more light to this rumor.
OK Joey as this is too funny for me specially since it's being brought out as a "breaking news" when I already mentioned something to this effect years ago.

Logs bought in North America are processed on-board in-transit. The ship has a sawmill and kiln-dryers and this is done mainly for efficient time management. The raw materials just sitting there on its way to China is a waste of time so a decision was made to start the manufacturing process in-transit. Some manufacturers utilize return trips for finish application (clear coat, tips, bumpers and stickers) and packing.

Other US based company's too have been producing off-shore for quite sometime now but are pushed to find creative ways to steer clear of the "Buy America" sentiment. One was even forced to purchase their rejects (with minor blemishes) so as for these to not end up as competing products to theirs. They just mark them as such and offer discounts on these blems. The Filipino cuemakers' were even blamed for these supposed "counterfeits" when in truth they were the company's rejects that the sub-contractor found a marketing channel for.

China did start out with sub-par products but that's because of being alienated by other nations (lack of technological knowledge). Taiwan, on the other hand, started getting progressive with better quality products due to better production techniques taught by the Americans and Europeans. I was almost a part of this, 7 years ago, as I was approached to do sticker designs for the cues and to teach cuemaking in Taiwan. I declined as I only have time to dedicate to my own products. The product quality slowly increased as did labour expense so Taiwan manufacturers started moving their manufacturing to the mainland.

Well, the mainland Chinese learned the process so the break-away groups that has knowledge and access to cheaper Mainland equipment is now the main source of the lower cost products that you see and get.

It's funny that when I first posted about this back then I was ignored. Breaking news? LOL It really doesn't matter where it's made as long as it brings the satisfaction that the purchaser is looking for.

Boro Nut
07-10-2006, 04:13 AM
Well we all now know about the cues made in China. But you guys won't believe this...The cues are made on a ship on the way here from China..... What next?

GM Bonzai Maple trees. Cut the branches off and clag a tip on, straight from the forest.

Remember where you heard it first.

Boro Nut

pooltchr
07-10-2006, 05:03 AM
Since most all the products are shipped from China in SEALED CONTAINERS, I would find it hard to believe that there is much production being done on board. My company orders large amounts of product on a regular basis. Most is shipped in those containers, although we are given the option of having some product sent air freight if we need it sooner. I don't think they are finishing anything on the cargo jet.
Steve

bandido
07-10-2006, 06:05 AM
You're right since you mentioned air freight. But sealed containers is more of dictated by US Laws and the Chinese does things to not have to comply with any law that's why log processing is done on the trip to China. Some deck hands are retrained for the chores than just to have them sit around during the voyage. Other workers who are not certified seamen are also employed and paid less benefits or pay due to non-declared income. Who's going to go after them, the International Revenue Service?

This is also done to get quicker ROI and lesser capital expense.

onepocketchump
07-10-2006, 06:42 AM
OK Joey as this is too funny for me specially since it's being brought out as a "breaking news" when I already mentioned something to this effect years ago.

Logs bought in North America are processed on-board in-transit. The ship has a sawmill and kiln-dryers and this is done mainly for efficient time management. The raw materials just sitting there on its way to China is a waste of time so a decision was made to start the manufacturing process in-transit. Some manufacturers utilize return trips for finish application (clear coat, tips, bumpers and stickers) and packing.

Other US based company's too have been producing off-shore for quite sometime now but are pushed to find creative ways to steer clear of the "Buy America" sentiment. One was even forced to purchase their rejects (with minor blemishes) so as for these to not end up as competing products to theirs. They just mark them as such and offer discounts on these blems. The Filipino cuemakers' were even blamed for these supposed "counterfeits" when in truth they were the company's rejects that the sub-contractor found a marketing channel for.

China did start out with sub-par products but that's because of being alienated by other nations (lack of technological knowledge). Taiwan, on the other hand, started getting progressive with better quality products due to better production techniques taught by the Americans and Europeans. I was almost a part of this, 7 years ago, as I was approached to do sticker designs for the cues and to teach cuemaking in Taiwan. I declined as I only have time to dedicate to my own products. The product quality slowly increased as did labour expense so Taiwan manufacturers started moving their manufacturing to the mainland.

Well, the mainland Chinese learned the process so the break-away groups that has knowledge and access to cheaper Mainland equipment is now the main source of the lower cost products that you see and get.

It's funny that when I first posted about this back then I was ignored. Breaking news? LOL It really doesn't matter where it's made as long as it brings the satisfaction that the purchaser is looking for.

Do you have any actual first-hand proof of this? I could even believe that the logs 'might' be worked on on the way to China but I highly doubt that there are any cues being touched on the way back.

I am sorry but this sounds like some kind of fantasy rumor with no basis in reality. I highly doubt that any shipping company wants to have loose logs that turn into missiles in rough seas. Not to mention the power required for the processing. It's just not energy efficient to do the processing on a ship.

I find it absolutely hilarious that there are so many speculative rumors about the billiard industry and overseas manufacturing in general.

I have sourced wood and raw materials for Taiwanese and Chinese cuemakers and in all that time I never came across any indication of wood processing at sea.

John

onepocketchump
07-10-2006, 06:48 AM
You're right since you mentioned air freight. But sealed containers is more of dictated by US Laws and the Chinese does things to not have to comply with any law that's why log processing is done on the trip to China. Some deck hands are retrained for the chores than just to have them sit around during the voyage. Other workers who are not certified seamen are also employed and paid less benefits or pay due to non-declared income. Who's going to go after them, the International Revenue Service?

This is also done to get quicker ROI and lesser capital expense.

What? Sailors have enough to do to keep the ship from sinking. Have you ever seen a container ship? They are packed so tightly that a mouse can't squeeze between them. There is NO WAY that there are floating factories doing wood processing enroute to China.

Less benefits? Less than what, Chinese labor costs on land? Your statements sound very specualtive at best. If there are these floating sweatshops then someone out there would know about them. Bring us some kind of evidence that they exist other than something someone made up.

John

bandido
07-10-2006, 06:55 AM
Well deja vu! Same as when I first mentioned that Preds were made in China.

pharaoh68
07-10-2006, 06:57 AM
I'll echo TImberly's statement. These are $30 house cues. Who cares??? They'll be warped, dinged, dented, whatever in six months anyway!

macguy
07-10-2006, 07:09 AM
Well we all now know about the cues made in China. But you guys won't believe this...again from a very reliable source in the industry. I've known for quite a while that the Valley house cues are now made in China, says so on the sticker. Used to you could see huge differences in the woods used on the Valleys, even a few purpleheart and such. And they had the old fiber ferrules too. Now they all look the same, brown wood, and have plastic ferrules. Often the points are "painted" to try and even them up and weight bolts are often not centered causing them to "hop" as they roll. Sticker says "made in China"...guess where they are really made? Go ahead and guess...I'll give you ten tries...LOL!
The cues are made on a ship on the way here from China. Thats right, made on a boat. Seems for some tax/duty/tariff whatever reasons...they deemed it cheaper to actually make the cues on a ship. So if you are a big U.S. distributor and order some cases of Valley bar cues...they fire up the ship and they are constructed in route. What next?

Why do you care how Valley builds their cues or their weight screws may be off center? They build cheap disposable house cues that's the business they are in. I doubt a pool room will lose any customers because the points on their house cues are not even. Is this really an issue?

onepocketchump
07-10-2006, 07:10 AM
Well deja vu! Same as when I first mentioned that Preds were made in China.

So what? People inside the industry know where things are made. We know which factory they came from and who is doing the buying.

Are you saying that we should accept your unsubstantiated rumor as fact because you say it's true?

I find nothing on the Internet to suggest that there is any kind fo manufacturing in any industry happening at sea. Not a shred of evidence. If you are going to muckrake then at least try to provide some form of proof for your claims. Otherwise I can get the same degree of reliable information from the National Enquirer.

John

Hal
07-10-2006, 07:11 AM
I think the guy that actually does the cue building is named Colin Colenso. His pay is proportionate to the number of points that he paints even.

Varney Cues
07-10-2006, 07:21 AM
Why do you care how Valley builds their cues or their weight screws may be off center? They build cheap disposable house cues that's the business they are in. I doubt a pool room will lose any customers because the points on their house cues are not even. Is this really an issue?
No...this is really not an issue. You missed the point. Just thought it was interesting that the cues are actually made (or partly made) on a ship.

Edwin...thank you sir for supplying some facts to the issue. I for one will apologize to you for the poor attitude here of some.
KV

bandido
07-10-2006, 07:24 AM
So what? People inside the industry know where things are made. We know which factory they came from and who is doing the buying.

Are you saying that we should accept your unsubstantiated rumor as fact because you say it's true?

I find nothing on the Internet to suggest that there is any kind fo manufacturing in any industry happening at sea. Not a shred of evidence. If you are going to muckrake then at least try to provide some form of proof for your claims. Otherwise I can get the same degree of reliable information from the National Enquirer.

John
John,
The manufacturing origin was mentioned as part of another topic that pertained to counterfeiting. Please don't treat my posts as muckracking somebody as none is intended.

And yes I do have associates based in other countries in Asia. But of course, you can treat it as just National Enquirer stuff since it's just business stuff between Asians. I don't know how to explain it to someone not in a 3rd world country. The advanced countries just find most of what happens here absurd based on what they're used to. Peace, John
Edwin Reyes

onepocketchump
07-10-2006, 08:05 AM
John,
The manufacturing origin was mentioned as part of another topic that pertained to counterfeiting. Please don't treat my posts as muckracking somebody as none is intended.

And yes I do have associates based in other countries in Asia. But of course, you can treat it as just National Enquirer stuff since it's just business stuff between Asians. I don't know how to explain it to someone not in a 3rd world country. The advanced countries just find most of what happens here absurd based on what they're used to. Peace, John
Edwin Reyes

Well I suppose it mght come as a surprise to you that I am fairly familiar with a lot of the inner workings of the Asian billiards business. I also know quite a lot about the counterfeiting that goes on in the billiard industry.

Still, in all my time in the industry I have never heard of anyone doing wood processing, or end-of-production work on the ships in transit. Assuming for a moment that it was true would you care to explain how the customs paperwork works out for that? Given that though treaty and international law there are conventional and univeral transport protocols that normally govern the transport of goods and raw materials between nations, I find it hard to concieve of how the paperwork looks for raw materials being converted to finished materials in transit.

Do they just have these floating shops as secret compartments on the ships and bribe all the officials in all the ports? The cost savings must be huge then to undertake that much effort to get around tariffs and duties. Of which there aren't any for pool cues coming into the USA by the way.

John

onepocketchump
07-10-2006, 08:07 AM
No...this is really not an issue. You missed the point. Just thought it was interesting that the cues are actually made (or partly made) on a ship.

Edwin...thank you sir for supplying some facts to the issue. I for one will apologize to you for the poor attitude here of some.
KV

You mean that you "think" they are made on a ship. And Edwin did not supply any facts at all. He said, "it's an Asian thing, you wouldn't understand".

To you; it's a logic thing, you wouldn't understand.

John

bandido
07-10-2006, 08:20 AM
Not really surprised John. Billiard equipment manufacturing in Asia was concieved in America mainly for the American consumers. The expectation was lower manufacturing cost, faster return of investment and higher profit. How to attain those expectations was for the local manufacturers to figure out.

macguy
07-10-2006, 08:29 AM
No...this is really not an issue. You missed the point. Just thought it was interesting that the cues are actually made (or partly made) on a ship.

Edwin...thank you sir for supplying some facts to the issue. I for one will apologize to you for the poor attitude here of some.
KV

Mind you, I have no idea what I am talking about and just brain storming, but I could imagine a scenario where they may do something like, not build finished products, but maybe load raw logs on to what could be something like a floating lumber mill and process the logs into lumber that is delivered at the other end for some reason. Maybe to skirt some kinds of trade agreements or tariffs on raw goods, who knows. I met a guy at a trade show who sold bar stools and chairs. We had lunch and he was telling how they did some of the business.

They bought the lumber in Canada and brought it into the U.S. then it was exported to someplace in South America and turned into roughed out furniture and imported back into the U.S. where it was finished and ready to sell. They would go through this whole song and dance just to make barstools so I could imagine almost anything is possible when it comes to moving goods from one country to another trying to skirt all kinds of issues.

Boro Nut
07-10-2006, 08:43 AM
I'll echo TImberly's statement. These are $30 house cues. Who cares???

Come off it. I doubt even the Chinese live in $30 houses.

Boro Nut

bandido
07-10-2006, 09:58 AM
Mind you, I have no idea what I am talking about and just brain storming, but I could imagine a scenario where they may do something like, not build finished products, but maybe load raw logs on to what could be something like a floating lumber mill and process the logs into lumber that is delivered at the other end for some reason. Maybe to skirt some kinds of trade agreements or tariffs on raw goods, who knows. I met a guy at a trade show who sold bar stools and chairs. We had lunch and he was telling how they did some of the business.

They bought the lumber in Canada and brought it into the U.S. then it was exported to someplace in South America and turned into roughed out furniture and imported back into the U.S. where it was finished and ready to sell. They would go through this whole song and dance just to make barstools so I could imagine almost anything is possible when it comes to moving goods from one country to another trying to skirt all kinds of issues.
Same process for these http://forums.azbilliards.com/showthread.php?t=35996. Remember when this guy first offered these and wrote about them as Pred blanks until he got correspondence from the mentioned party. I don't know what was wrong with that unless backlash from some sort of deception or omission is being avoided.

From your example, other product manufacturers also think of creative ways to cut down on or maximize utilization of production time and capitalization.

smittie1984
07-10-2006, 11:51 AM
Why don't we eliminate the income tax and bring back the tariffs we already eliminated? Tariffs were intended by the constitution to be the main source of income for the federal government. The 16th, and the 17th and 18th amendments should have never been passed.

Why should a communist be punished just for being communist when fascists run wild all over Washington? Disclaimer: I am not nor have I ever been associated with the Communist Party!

unknownpro

The problem I have with taxes on imports is they are often manipulated so American companies can have an advantage. I believe imported cars from Japan are taxed around 30%. Which drives the cost of an import car up. If we eliminated this it would force the Big 3 to build better and cheaper cars and with competition it would happen fast.

Also if we eliminated taxes on imports every company in the world would want to do business with the United States.

On top of that if the world decides to not sell us stuff anymore we would be financially ruined since we couldn't tax their goods since they aren't shipping them here. A consumption tax would fit this.

CrownCityCorey
07-10-2006, 01:40 PM
The best Fireworks are made in China :D

Fuji-whopper
07-10-2006, 01:43 PM
I like their food.

cigardave
07-10-2006, 01:57 PM
I like their food.

Why am I not impressed.

pooltchr
07-10-2006, 06:56 PM
I would like to hear any theory as to how 1 specific container that has been loaded on to a modern cargo ship might be opened, unloaded, "processed", reloaded, and re-sealed while out to sea. Those containers are the size of a tractor trailer, and are loaded and unloaded with cranes at the docks. Logistically, it would seem to me to be far more trouble and far more expensive than it would be to do all the work in a factory that is designed to make pool cues. If you already have a factory on dry land, why would you want to put one on a ship? And how would you know that you were always going to have your freight on the same ship? Or do they build these factories on all the ships? Or do the cue companies own one ship that they use all the time?

It just doesn't make any sense, logistically or financially.
Steve

cueandcushion
07-12-2006, 05:03 PM
I heard a fact based on a rumour based on a reliable source of a friend of a guy who once saw a pool cue made. He assures me with 100% reliability that all house cues are made by alien hybrids made in Area 51 near Roswell, New Mexico. These hybrids were manufactured using alien dna mixed with Chinese slave labor. This keeps the labor price to zero, since all they eat is sand. They also don't require sleep, so they work 24 hours a day. This will help my pool business beyond imagination since alien cues dont warp for at least 30 days after drunk kids sword fight with them during breaks between 8-Ball games. This lowered the price of my pool cues from $12.00 a piece to $11.95. I am still trying to figure out where I will invest this extra money. Any suggestions? :rolleyes:

Scott Lee
07-12-2006, 05:41 PM
He assures me with 100% reliability that all house cues are made by alien hybrids made in Area 51 near Roswell, New Mexico.

Oh come on! EVERYONE knows that Area 51 is in Nevada, not New Mexico!:rolleyes: :D

Scott Lee
www.poolknowledge.com

TellsItLikeItIs
07-12-2006, 05:54 PM
I am still trying to figure out where I will invest this extra money. Any suggestions? :rolleyes:
I'm not at liberty to discuss all I heard, but you might consider investing all that extra income into the fast food business.

I have it "from a very reliable source in the industry" that a certain fast food chain is now processing and flame broiling their beef during transit. Yep, it's true ;) They have a pilot program in effect now in one of the southern states. They round up the beef (on the hoof of course) then herd them into 50' tractor drawn trailers. The moment the steer enters the trailer, it is picked up by a huge mechanical hand. The mechanical hand begins processing the steers into patties and hands it off to another mechanical hand that holds it over a flame until it is fully broiled. From that point the cooked patty is mechanically inserted between a bun, along with the lettuce, tomatoes, & onions.

My "very reliable source" couldn't tell me how they handled the special orders, but I'm sure they have that worked out as well.

You may want to consult your financial advisor on this. I'm sure if you hurry you can get in on the ground floor. Lots of $$$ to be made on this one I'm sure.

smittie1984
07-12-2006, 06:39 PM
It just doesn't make any sense, logistically or financially.
Steve

Because of our tax system. You'd be amazed at what people will do to avoid the United States Tax Consequences.

Do you know how many times people have told me they are writing their pool table off as an office desk, table saw, design board, or even weirder things? It's all because of our tax system. It's a giant mess that needs to go.

jay helfert
07-12-2006, 07:44 PM
I heard a fact based on a rumour based on a reliable source of a friend of a guy who once saw a pool cue made. He assures me with 100% reliability that all house cues are made by alien hybrids made in Area 51 near Roswell, New Mexico. These hybrids were manufactured using alien dna mixed with Chinese slave labor. This keeps the labor price to zero, since all they eat is sand. They also don't require sleep, so they work 24 hours a day. This will help my pool business beyond imagination since alien cues dont warp for at least 30 days after drunk kids sword fight with them during breaks between 8-Ball games. This lowered the price of my pool cues from $12.00 a piece to $11.95. I am still trying to figure out where I will invest this extra money. Any suggestions? :rolleyes:

Very funny shit here. Thanks for the chuckle and the creativity.

Tommy Joe
07-14-2006, 04:53 PM
I like cheap cues. The ones I have hit good enough to win. They break like a ton o bricks, and I dont care who made them as long as it gets the job done. Sure I have a few decent customs, but I play with my secret asian specials more often than not. And for a few bucks, I dont have to be extra careful in some of those shadier venues we all like to frequent. (Quote)


I don't know if you're joking or not, but I'll assume you're serious, because I happen to agree with you. I don't like the really cheap balsa wood type cues, but I do favor a cue you can put to work without worrying about every little nick. My brother bought me a $150.00 cue for my birthday 12 years ago, which he shouldn't have done because I haven't played regular since 1978 and a bit in the mid 80s. I hocked the stick about 2 years ago during a stupid drinking binge. I liked the stick, but I really hated taking it out of the case, then unscrewing the safety plug on the shaft, then screwing it together, then going through the same ever-lasting procedure when it was time to pack it up. Back in the 80s I took two Dufferins off the pool-hall wall and took them to a guy in Orange County California and for a total of 40 dollars he made me two two-piece cues, both interchangeable. They were not sneaky petes. He put a nice joint in there. They were solid and no one can convince me there is a better stick, although I know longer have them, one stolen, the other smashed in fury following a loss. I knew a guy around that time who carried his old beat up stick in a towel bound with some kind of rope. I liked the way he just opened it up and put it together and was ready to go without all the hoopla. So, if you're serious about preferring a cheap stick, I tend to agree with you; there's something nice about a cheaper stick, where you can have a steady supply of them and can use them without treating them like something out of a museum that must be babied at every turn. Personally, the best sticks I've ever used were good house cues, one-piece cues, and in my early years when I was really enthused with playing every day, I would travel from one poolroom to another carrying the one-piece - on a city bus. I felt like an idiot sometimes, but really, what good is a two-piece stick other than providing portablility? I'm not saying I prefer an absolute piece of garbage stick, just one that's affordable and can be used, discarded, and replaced without feeling like I'm buying a new car or a house - two things I've also never had. But that's another story.

Tommy Joe

cueandcushion
07-17-2006, 03:24 PM
Oh come on! EVERYONE knows that Area 51 is in Nevada, not New Mexico!:rolleyes: :D

Scott Lee
www.poolknowledge.com


No..the government WANTS you to think it is in Nevada......

Its part of the right wing conspiracy to hide all the oil wells in New Mexico.

This is where they manufactured Monica Lewinsky too. Coincidence?

Think about it.....:rolleyes: