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(((Satori)))
11-03-2015, 07:31 PM
Why are they so good?

Is it the action that the Filipinos stay in?

Is it the perfect mechanics of the Taiwanese?

Are they just born with it?

Is it their desire that pushes them above and beyond?


What is it?

TATE
11-03-2015, 07:49 PM
Why are they so good?

Is it the action that the Filipinos stay in?

Is it the perfect mechanics of the Taiwanese?

Are they just born with it?

Is it their desire that pushes them above and beyond?


What is it?

Let's add the Europeans into the conversation as well. Dedication and professionalism.

Filipinos - yes, action and dedication to playing competitive pool daily for many, many hours against top competition. Play for a car or a soda, they want to play and they want to gamble.

Taiwanese - So many seem to have emulated Fong Pang Chau, from mechanics even down to his facial expressions and patterns. They have a structured tournament system and are always playing somewhere in a tournament. No weaknesses.

Until now, the Taiwanese and Chinese have not done particularly well in the USA - not like the Filipinos. I expect a flood of Taiwanese and Chinese in the US Open next year. Maybe they need to expand the field.

Don't want to seem unpatriotic, but an Asian/Europe Cup would be good action. I'll take the Asians.

one stroke
11-03-2015, 07:53 PM
Let's add the Europeans into the conversation as well. Dedication and professionalism.

Filipinos - yes, action and dedication to playing competitive pool daily for many, many hours against top competition. Play for a car or a soda, they want to play and they want to gamble.

Taiwanese - So many seem to have emulated Fong Pang Chau, from mechanics even down to his facial expressions and patterns. They have a structured tournament system and are always playing somewhere in a tournament. No weaknesses.

Until now, the Taiwanese and Chinese have not done particularly well in the USA - not like the Filipinos. I expect a flood of Taiwanese and Chinese in the US Open next year. Maybe they need to expand the field.

Don't want to seem unpatriotic, but an Asian/Europe Cup would be good action. I'll take the Asians.

I remember to this day watching Fong Pang winning the winner take all international with a display of pool that was unbelievable
There's no stoping the Asians now

1

Teacherman
11-03-2015, 08:02 PM
Training...

(((Satori)))
11-03-2015, 08:03 PM
The Filipinos and Taiwanese or Chinese all seem to have some differences in their style of play but one thing that I have noticed is that they all seem to have a very easy going temperment that seems to be shark proof and stress reducing under pressure situations. I think this has to be a factor in how good they play.

(((Satori)))
11-03-2015, 08:04 PM
Training...

Do you know how they train or are you assuming they do something different?

What is it about their training that you believe sets them apart?

klone
11-03-2015, 08:04 PM
In Taiwan the government supports cue sports, gives rewards to winners of international sanctioned tournaments, and has a system of mentors to grow younger players.

Unfortunately the U.S. has none of those...?

ribdoner
11-03-2015, 08:07 PM
Why are they so good?

Is it the action that the Filipinos stay in?

Is it the perfect mechanics of the Taiwanese?

Are they just born with it?

Is it their desire that pushes them above and beyond?


What is it?

not spectacular, ie., Keith, Earl, Louie, Jayson, etc., but, they get out when they're supposed to and the moment isn't too big for them

DTL
11-03-2015, 08:14 PM
..................

kaoandy1125
11-03-2015, 08:24 PM
In Taiwan the government supports cue sports, gives rewards to winners of international sanctioned tournaments, and has a system of mentors to grow younger players.

Unfortunately the U.S. has none of those...?

What you said "was" true.
Unfortunately, Taiwanese government basically doesn't give enough attention to pool, as they never really had.
We don't have a men professional tournament this year, and ironically, we won a lot of titles this year.
Just because pool is not being played at the next Asian Games, our government cut a whole bunch of budget on pool.
In short, there are currently NO professional tournaments for men in Taiwan, and I think that's sad.
Surprising right? We have so many talented players and they can't even play a single tournament in our own country.

fish2
11-03-2015, 08:30 PM
A lot (most??? ) of the smaller pool halls in the Philippines charge on a per game basis, hence the tendency is to play a longer lasting game like Rotation, (one pocket is not played in the Philippines) think of it as 9 ball, but with 15 balls on the table. you pocket the lowest numbered ball, every ball counts and each ball is assigned a point based on its number. First to 61 points wins. You learn how to navigate around 15 other balls, once your used to rotation.. 9 balls is a cinch :)

(((Satori)))
11-03-2015, 08:32 PM
What you said "was" true.
Unfortunately, Taiwanese government basically doesn't give enough attention to pool, as they never really had.
We don't have a men professional tournament this year, and ironically, we won a lot of titles this year.
Just because pool is not being played at the next Asian Games, our government cut a whole bunch of budget on pool.
In short, there are currently NO professional tournaments for men in Taiwan, and I think that's sad.
Surprising right? We have so many talented players and they can't even play a single tournament in our own country.

Can you confrm what DTL said about the training? Are there any top pros over there who are not a part of the group that goes international... similar to how Kevin Cheng doesnt seem to be a part of that group.

Do you have any more insight on how the group that travels together trains? More details as to what they are doing? Drills what?

Thanks.

Tokyo-dave
11-03-2015, 08:46 PM
I know that when I lived in Japan you could walk into any pool room almost anytime of the day and see kids either playing eachother low stakes, playing a ring game "Go-ku", or running drills.
Walk into a poolroom in the US and you see maybe one or two money matches with half the room sitting on the rail, and the rest of the good players sitting on their asses and preaching "I won't screw my cue together for less than $100.)

Hardly ever see anybody running drills or even playing good competitive matches unless there's cash involved.

I'm not at all against playing for cash, but I think I see US players reach a level where they feel they can gamble and make a little............and peter out at that level. Just good enough to get the cash isn't good enough to win major tournaments. Pool and billiards is a game here often being played by "pool players" while in some countries, it's a sport played by athletes.

Dave

kaoandy1125
11-03-2015, 08:49 PM
Can you confrm what DTL said about the training? Are there any top pros over there who are not a part of the group that goes international... similar to how Kevin Cheng doesnt seem to be a part of that group.

Do you have any more insight on how the group that travels together trains? More details as to what they are doing? Drills what?

Thanks.

From what I heard and saw this July, players do gather at a local pool hall before this asian tournament to practice. However, they basically play against each other for 9/10 ball, or something called 235 (A different kind of carom, I think it's only being played in taiwan). By the way, they train on tight pockets (https://youtu.be/kFpgEIXdhmY?t=6m48s)
These pros come from different places, for example, Ko brothers, Wu (Yup he's taiwanese) and Chang Jung Lin attended the same high school, but other players attend other schools.
Hence they don't train together, except for those training sessions before major tournament (I think this is what DTL was referring to). We do have coaches for those training sessions, and that's all I know.
And yes, Kevin Cheng wasn't with the group, he came by himself and kicked everyone's ass lol. I think everyone else are with the group though.
It's just sad that our pool talent is being ignored by our government... Kevin Cheng actually posted on his facebook page in Sept saying he needed to think about his career...since there are no tournaments in Taiwan for him to play, and playing abroad is really like gambling...imagine how much he has to pay for this trip to the US if he got knocked out in 2nd round of US Open?

mikeyfrost
11-03-2015, 08:50 PM
It's just their time right now. This is the push our top players needed to reach that next level. It's good for the game what's happening right now. Enjoy this time.

King T
11-03-2015, 10:08 PM
Let's add the Europeans into the conversation as well. Dedication and professionalism.

Filipinos - yes, action and dedication to playing competitive pool daily for many, many hours against top competition. Play for a car or a soda, they want to play and they want to gamble.

Taiwanese - So many seem to have emulated Fong Pang Chau, from mechanics even down to his facial expressions and patterns. They have a structured tournament system and are always playing somewhere in a tournament. No weaknesses.

Until now, the Taiwanese and Chinese have not done particularly well in the USA - not like the Filipinos. I expect a flood of Taiwanese and Chinese in the US Open next year. Maybe they need to expand the field.

Don't want to seem unpatriotic, but an Asian/Europe Cup would be good action. I'll take the Asians.

I have traveled the world and this is the only place where the players take so much pride in stealing, beating tricks and bragging about it and ducking tuff action, it hurts their game.

sjm
11-03-2015, 10:21 PM
Asians have better playing temperament but, more importantly, they make better decisions than Americans in rotation games. Their shot conceptualization is better, with better choices in offense, defense and far greater use of two way and other multipurpose shots.

Somewhat similarly, Americans, on average, are better at shot conceptualization than Asians at one pocket but Asians have gradually closed this gap by studying and copying the top Americans.

Americans need to similarly close the gap with the Asians in rotation games by studying the way that Asians play. Americans are so obsessed with the break that they, far too often, fail to develop complementary skills to the extent that is necessary. Sad but true.

JoeyInCali
11-03-2015, 11:06 PM
It's no longer a secret.
Mika, Morra and SVB went to Asia and joined the action there to get better .
Rodney Morris did the same thing .
Action in Taiwan is really tough. These guys have super tight pockets down there.

DavidMNienow
11-03-2015, 11:08 PM
Hardly ever see anybody running drills or even playing good competitive matches unless there's cash involved.

Dave

Back in the day when I was able to compete on a constant regular basis, I decided to develop my own training program to improve my skill set. In order to do that I adopted the PAT drills, added additional material from my library of books for shots to practice, and developed a variety of forms to keep track of my training efforts. I did that solid for 6 months before a car accident ended my ability to play. During those 6 months my playing improved a great deal. Enough to irritate/piss off local players who found it harder to get wins against me. I adopted a mental playing philosophy on par of other professional athletes based on reading multiple sports psychology books I read. I went from having an un-regimented no intent bang the balls style of practice to a regimented training system with planned goals and intent all to improve my overall game skills. And it was working very good for me.

I talked to a handful of local pool players about what I was doing. Showed them the forms I created to keep track of my drills and training efforts. U know how many local players asked for copies of my forms to use in their own efforts at self improvement? The answer was 1, maybe 2. It was a few years ago.

Know how many times I walked into the pool room to see any players doing drills and keeping track of their performance efforts? The answer was NONE.

Sure once in a great while I would see someone doing A drill. But never keeping track of how many times they succeeded or failed. Which to me made the whole effort worthless. Because without keeping track of successs/failure, balls made or missed, then how does anyone know that any direct improvement is taking place? To me that was pretty basic to my training efforts. Tracking one's training efforts to me seems fundamental to self improvement. But it seems totally lost on the vast majority of pool players here in the United States.

So if structured training programs in europe and asia lead to major differences in players in those regions to where those players kick the ass of American players in competition, then perhaps American pool players need to re-asses their bang the balls with no intent practice regimens, and make some changes to see some major improvement in their own game skills.

poolchady
11-04-2015, 12:05 AM
Agree.

I was watching the finals of the US Open on accustats live stream and Mark Wilson was talking about this. He said a lot of the top players form Taiwan train at the same facility........said "last Tuesday was jump stick training day".

In Taiwan, there are a couple of senior high schools that have what we called "Pool Class" specifically for young fellows who are interested in pool.
It's similiar to those NCAA kids in colleges in the States.
They still need to finish their Math homework or attend their English lessons but they use their spare time to train.
The good thing is if they won a big tournament or ranked top 3 in the state or perform well, they will be admitted to the college/university without taking the entrance exam.
That gives them motivation to learn and work hard.
I have no idea how they trained in China since Taiwan and China are totally different countries. I do know a lot of Taiwanese professional players going to China for coaching young female talents. That's why Chinese young ladies are so strong in the WPC.

RiverCity
11-04-2015, 12:41 AM
Asians have better playing temperament but, more importantly, they make better decisions than Americans in rotation games. Their shot conceptualization is better, with better choices in offense, defense and far greater use of two way and other multipurpose shots.

Somewhat similarly, Americans, on average, are better at shot conceptualization than Asians at one pocket but Asians have gradually closed this gap by studying and copying the top Americans.

Americans need to similarly close the gap with the Asians in rotation games by studying the way that Asians play. Americans are so obsessed with the break that they, far too often, fail to develop complementary skills to the extent that is necessary. Sad but true.

Tap tap tap!

O'SulliReyes
11-04-2015, 12:45 AM
Technique-wise, Taiwanese players are generally more textbook than the Filipinos. This is largely because of the rigorous systematic training regime that they have there. This is quite similar to the way snooker as a sport is being handled in the UK. Thus, this also explains why Taiwanese players have a common playing style in terms of stroke (mechanical) and how they conduct themselves around the table. Consistency is the name of their game.

Filipinos meanwhile couldn't be any more different. Back when I was a kid living in a village not too far from Ronnie Alcano's hometown, people viewed pool as, quite oxymoronically, an indoor street game. The big-time money players honed their temperament thanks to the high-pressure environment in which they played. The young guns would typically look at how the grown-ups play the game, copy them and integrate their own style to it, and polished their game so that their mechanics, while not textbook, gets the job done. I have been playing snooker since I was a teenager (I'm 23 now), but I still have traces of the wavy Filipino stroke thanks to years of playing pool as a child. Efren Reyes and Francisco Bustamante are your prototypical Filipino players--highly unorthodox but effective cue action, and unparalleled knowledge of the table attained from years of playing on tough conditions (humidity, slow cloth etc).

Just wanna share this online article by a Filipino sports journalist and World Pool Championship TV commentator Bob Guerrero on why Filipinos have dominated this game for quite some time now: https://sg.sports.yahoo.com/blogs/the-passionate-fan/filipinos-learn-billiards-masters-164655974.html

"The money game culture is harsh, unforgiving, and Darwinian. You sink or you swim. You either lose money or make it. But it works. It has toughened up generations of Pinoy players, steeling them for the pressure of tournaments, and forcing them to work on their technique on their own, or risk going hungry."

Marky Mark
11-04-2015, 01:03 AM
Re: the Filipinos, my assumption is that it is their desire to make their lives more comfortable and lift their family or families-to-be from hardship. I also think that these Pinoy pros are also very intelligent persons. If they had the opportunity to be in school I believe they will excel too. Their approach to the game; being that it's not scientific, is what gives them the creativity on the table. As Parica said in an interview before, Pinoys do not have the time to practice. They just play and learn as they go. Since they are intelligent, they pick up things easily and are able to apply what they learn.

I think these are some of the main reasons that help propel them to be among the very best.

arps
11-04-2015, 03:14 AM
a typical filipino would do regular stuff using his hands instead of a machine or an equipment. this is significant especially in daily tasks - carpentry, cooking, cleaning, etc. that is my theory - we use our hands a lot. somehow, we master using it everyday. ask efren, bustamante, orcollo, or any other Filipino pool player if he can do the laundry using his hands instead of a washing machine. most of them can.

kurama418
11-04-2015, 07:38 AM
I tried getting people to play 235 here (US), and only one person in the pool hall thinks it will benefit his game and now we play the game once every 1-2 days of a goal who can get one 5. Sometimes we will switch to 3 cusion. Most players say there is no point of playing carom on a normal pool table since it has pockets... I try to state it is just a practice to familiar the characteristics of the cue ball, target ball, different strokes, English, tangent line deflectiins, follow through pattern etc... Most claim playing these games will throw your stroke off, is that true? I mean if you cant hit the ball where you want in 235 it is the same like missing a ball in a pocketed game.

snucar
11-04-2015, 07:50 AM
I have traveled the world and this is the only place where the players take so much pride in stealing, beating tricks and bragging about it and ducking tuff action, it hurts their game.

If you were talking strictly about the Pinoys, I'd have agreed with you up to a certain extend. But the Taiwanese, Chinese and Japanese players' behavior during a match is exemplary.

In any case, this is irrelevant to the discussion. We're discussing the technical merits of their success.

Johnnyt
11-04-2015, 08:02 AM
Re: the Filipinos, my assumption is that it is their desire to make their lives more comfortable and lift their family or families-to-be from hardship. I also think that these Pinoy pros are also very intelligent persons. If they had the opportunity to be in school I believe they will excel too. Their approach to the game; being that it's not scientific, is what gives them the creativity on the table. As Parica said in an interview before, Pinoys do not have the time to practice. They just play and learn as they go. Since they are intelligent, they pick up things easily and are able to apply what they learn.

I think these are some of the main reasons that help propel them to be among the very best.

I agree 100%. Almost all sports are like this. When is the last time you saw a boxer that was well healed before he got to the top. Johnnyt

JB Cases
11-04-2015, 08:21 AM
Why are they so good?

Is it the action that the Filipinos stay in?

Is it the perfect mechanics of the Taiwanese?

Are they just born with it?

Is it their desire that pushes them above and beyond?


What is it?

Filipinos and Taiwanese/Chinese have to be put in separate categories.

Filipinos stay in action to preserve their pecking order. For them pool is a way to make money and get out of being poor.

Taiwanese generally don't have escaping poverty as a motivator. What they do have is a family and societal expectation to excel at whatever they choose to do. So they believe in the power of intense and structured training.

Same for the Chinese except that is coupled with escaping poverty.

So yes, desire and opportunity. They have the opportunity to be trained formally and to train competitively with world beaters.

gxman
11-04-2015, 08:24 AM
Good thing all these asian guys don't live here in the U.S to attend all the tournaments. It would leave crumbs for the american players in tournament earnings.

HelloBaby-
11-04-2015, 08:37 AM
Technique-wise, Taiwanese players are generally more textbook than the Filipinos. This is largely because of the rigorous systematic training regime that they have there. This is quite similar to the way snooker as a sport is being handled in the UK. Thus, this also explains why Taiwanese players have a common playing style in terms of stroke (mechanical) and how they conduct themselves around the table. Consistency is the name of their game.

Filipinos meanwhile couldn't be any more different. Back when I was a kid living in a village not too far from Ronnie Alcano's hometown, people viewed pool as, quite oxymoronically, an indoor street game. The big-time money players honed their temperament thanks to the high-pressure environment in which they played. The young guns would typically look at how the grown-ups play the game, copy them and integrate their own style to it, and polished their game so that their mechanics, while not textbook, gets the job done. I have been playing snooker since I was a teenager (I'm 23 now), but I still have traces of the wavy Filipino stroke thanks to years of playing pool as a child. Efren Reyes and Francisco Bustamante are your prototypical Filipino players--highly unorthodox but effective cue action, and unparalleled knowledge of the table attained from years of playing on tough conditions (humidity, slow cloth etc).

Just wanna share this online article by a Filipino sports journalist and World Pool Championship TV commentator Bob Guerrero on why Filipinos have dominated this game for quite some time now: https://sg.sports.yahoo.com/blogs/the-passionate-fan/filipinos-learn-billiards-masters-164655974.html

"The money game culture is harsh, unforgiving, and Darwinian. You sink or you swim. You either lose money or make it. But it works. It has toughened up generations of Pinoy players, steeling them for the pressure of tournaments, and forcing them to work on their technique on their own, or risk going hungry."

Do you notice that the younger generation of Filipinos and even few older ones no longer follow Efren or Busti's technique ? They adapted a more stable stroke, as you said, they are intelligent and they learn from others, this time they learned supposedly from the Taiwanese and Europeans.

Jose Parica comments about not having time to practice is wrong. Again you can not use example of some genius to draw a conclusion about what's the best way to go for the biggest chance to succeed.

If 100000 kids tried Efren and Busti ingenious style and only few succeeded, it's not the way to teach a new generation. The fact is the only one who succeeded is Ronnie Alcano.

You lost a lot more time learning on-the-go than having a good training and then going out to gamble. Learning on-the-go also has the risk of having some bad habits technique-wise.

On the other hand, I agree that gambling constantly is one of the best way to sharpen one's nerve. Playing for food is of course one of the biggest motivation, don't miss or you don't eat :wink:.

European also has a very structured training but they lack gambling spirit, they seems to need more time to mature mentally. Most Europeans reach their peak quite late.

Taiwanese had a structured training for kids AND they gamble on regular basis like the Filipinos, maybe not all days and nights but results proved that's a success formula.

Americans gamble but they only gamble when a good game shows up. I agree to the fact that most guys spend the whole day in a pool hall but they are sitting and talking more than playing.

alstl
11-04-2015, 08:40 AM
I can't speak to all Asians but my wife is Filipina, grew up in Tondo. Go to google maps , type tondo in the search box and use the pegman feature to drop yourself onto a street in Tondo. You see poverty everywhere and people busting their butts every day just to survive. No food stamps, no Obamaphone, no section 8 housing, no disability check and good jobs are hard to find. You work today so you have food to eat.

The pool players aren't just playing APA beer league pool. They are serious. They spend long hours at a pool table honing their skills. Efren is one of the nicest people you will meet but make no mistake - if you match up with Efren he wants to beat your ass. Take a close look at his eyes when he is down on a shot. Hand a guy like that a pool cue and he becomes an MMA fighter.

Teacherman
11-04-2015, 08:47 AM
What does SVB do after and between matches?

For how long?

How often?

What does Dennis Orcollo do after and between matches?

For how long?

How often?

What do most Americans do?

This is simple.....not brain surgery.

Shawn Armstrong
11-04-2015, 08:49 AM
I always loved watching the Filipino players when I got into pool. Efren and a young Bustamante were electric to watch. Big, swooping strokes. Juicing the ball all over the table - it made the game look a lot more fun. But watching the rise of the Chinese and Taiwanese players this past decade and a half, has been eye opening. If you want to talk playing style, Filipino is feel, and artistry. The Chinese/Taiwanese/Japanese model is pure mathematical precision. Only as much english as needed to change the angle of the shot. Lots of multiple rail shots with no running english - always coming into the angle of the shot. My favourite player, from the first time I saw him play, was Yang Ching Shun. He was burying Orcollo for big money in both of their primes. I'm not sure if he's playing again, but he, in my opinion, had the potential to dominate the game. If you've never seen him play, check him out on Youtube. Strickland even said, after being beat by him in a match, "he is the best player I've ever seen play the game". Pretty high praise.

watchez
11-04-2015, 08:51 AM
For the Filipinos, they are good cause as people say they are constantly playing each other and the action is real.

The Ko brothers family owns a pool room. Much of their 'training' happens there.

snucar
11-04-2015, 08:59 AM
My favourite player, from the first time I saw him play, was Yang Ching Shun. He was burying Orcollo for big money in both of their primes. I'm not sure if he's playing again, but he, in my opinion, had the potential to dominate the game. If you've never seen him play, check him out on Youtube. Strickland even said, after being beat by him in a match, "he is the best player I've ever seen play the game". Pretty high praise.

The 2002 WC semifinal between Francisco Bustamante and Ching-Shun Yang is, IMO, one of the greatest matches of all times.

NitPicker
11-04-2015, 10:34 AM
Training...

Succinct. But more precisely, it's not just how, but when...as in when they get started. The best players of anything...not just cue sports but anything, music as another example...no matter where you reside...the best of the best almost always got started very young and have simply invested more time. There is always a huge difference between someone that started at or near adulthood vs. the person that's been playing since they were old enough to walk or hold something in their hands.

There's no secret to this. You get people started as young as possible, at anything, and you not only develop a large and deep pool of skill, but a large and deep pool of customers for the future also.

Teacherman
11-04-2015, 10:38 AM
90% of Americans play their first competitive pool match when they are 21 years old or older. Bar League.

Until that changes....nothing changes.

NitPicker
11-04-2015, 10:41 AM
90% of Americans play their first competitive pool match when they are 21 years old or older. Bar League.

Until that changes....nothing changes.

Exact-a-mundo!

arps
11-04-2015, 10:54 AM
The 2002 WC semifinal between Francisco Bustamante and Ching-Shun Yang is, IMO, one of the greatest matches of all times.

i agree. best of the best.

JoeyInCali
11-04-2015, 11:05 AM
I always loved watching the Filipino players when I got into pool. Efren and a young Bustamante were electric to watch. Big, swooping strokes. Juicing the ball all over the table - it made the game look a lot more fun. But watching the rise of the Chinese and Taiwanese players this past decade and a half, has been eye opening. If you want to talk playing style, Filipino is feel, and artistry. The Chinese/Taiwanese/Japanese model is pure mathematical precision. Only as much english as needed to change the angle of the shot. Lots of multiple rail shots with no running english - always coming into the angle of the shot. My favourite player, from the first time I saw him play, was Yang Ching Shun. He was burying Orcollo for big money in both of their primes. I'm not sure if he's playing again, but he, in my opinion, had the potential to dominate the game. If you've never seen him play, check him out on Youtube. Strickland even said, after being beat by him in a match, "he is the best player I've ever seen play the game". Pretty high praise.

It's funny how playing conditions determine players' styles .
When Efren came over here, he had the long roller-coaster stroke.
But, after so many years of playing on fast cloth tables, he actually has lost that roller coaster stroke . Busta still has it .
I think the Taiwanese play in much better conditions in Taiwan. Mostly AC'd room and worsted cloth . So, their stroke looks more compact and their game more subtle. Kinda the same for Euro players.

Ron Swanson
11-04-2015, 11:48 AM
not spectacular, ie., Keith, Earl, Louie, Jayson, etc., but, they get out when they're supposed to and the moment isn't too big for them

Who's this Keith person i keep seeing referenced on here?

Shawn Armstrong
11-04-2015, 11:52 AM
Who's this Keith person i keep seeing referenced on here?

Grady Seasons

TATE
11-04-2015, 01:07 PM
I have traveled the world and this is the only place where the players take so much pride in stealing, beating tricks and bragging about it and ducking tuff action, it hurts their game.

If you were talking strictly about the Pinoys, I'd have agreed with you up to a certain extend. But the Taiwanese, Chinese and Japanese players' behavior during a match is exemplary.

In any case, this is irrelevant to the discussion. We're discussing the technical merits of their success.

He was agreeing with my post - therefore, I think he was commenting about American players.

My experience is Pinoy's will try to make a somewhat fair game given the chance and are not afraid of heads up competition - in fact, respect and welcome it.

railbird99
11-04-2015, 01:11 PM
Let's be real for a second. Everyone knows the asians are good because of the shape of their eyes. I have been implementing a severe squint in to my game for a couple of months now.

Kris_b1104
11-04-2015, 01:23 PM
Let's be real for a second. Everyone knows the asians are good because of the shape of their eyes. I have been implementing a severe squint in to my game for a couple of months now.

https://i.imgflip.com/tmkec.jpg

klone
11-04-2015, 01:31 PM
Let's be real for a second. Everyone knows the asians are good because of the shape of their eyes. I have been implementing a severe squint in to my game for a couple of months now.


Ya can't spell Caucasian without Asian... [emoji16]

railbird99
11-04-2015, 02:03 PM
https://i.imgflip.com/tmkec.jpg

Lmao. Be careful, everyone who's color blind is taking you seriously, and correctly pointing out that it's clearly ko pin yi

Ron Swanson
11-04-2015, 03:35 PM
Grady Seasons

Ah, nobody, then. Thanks.