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ace911
11-04-2015, 05:37 PM
Firstly, congratulations to my friend Kevin Cheng who won this year’s U.S. Open. He played great the entire event and deserved to win. He also recently came off a major tournament win in Beijing defeating Wu in the finals. Looks like he might just fire and starts winning everything.

401284


I also wanted to share my observations during the tournament. Living in America, we don’t often get a chance to watch the players from Asia compete. So, I took this opportunity to watch their matches as often as I could. One match that stuck out to me was Chang Jung Lin vs Li He Wen. Li He Wen must have broke and ran about 7 racks that match, winning something like 11-3. He pretty much denied Chang much of an opportunity that match. The few balls he had to shoot, were long and awkward, and very hard to come with, especially being in the chair for so long. Another match was between Liu Hai Tao and Hsu Kai Lun. I believe Liu Hai Tao has a background in Chinese 8-ball. In my opinion, his mechanics are amazing, he has a snooker stance, and his stroke has almost perfect timing. He is a tremendous shotmaker, but watching the way the he cued the ball, no shot really looked hard, everything looked routine, like a walk in the park. Liu Hai Tao denied Hsu Kai Lun many opportunities that set also. It seemed like that was a trend going on several matches, many great players lost because they were denied opportunities. Their opponents hardly missed balls and kept them in their chairs the majority of the match. One match I didn’t see but I heard about was Justin Bergman playing Kevin Cheng. Kevin told me he must have broke and ran 6 racks, and Justin might have broke and ran 5, Kevin won 11-10. What really dawned upon me, is that at this level missing balls is a luxury. Top players don’t expect to miss balls and return to the table, they expect to be punished for it every time, and usually expecting it to cost them a few games, and sometimes even the set.

What I also noticed is that these players really pride themselves in representing their country. For the most part, they are international players and represent their country everywhere they go, so they have some sense of patriotism. You also see this with the Filipinos a lot. If they win a tournament, they not only won for themselves, but also for their country. I feel that we don’t see that attitude or pride so much with American players, maybe with the few exceptions such as: Van Boening, Strickland, and Archer. I wonder if the level of play in America would be stronger if the players prided themselves more in representing their country? This is just a thought that really stood out to me watching this event.

Sorry for the late post, but I still wanted to get this out.

Thank you,

Mike Wong

ga9ball
11-04-2015, 07:54 PM
Nice post Mike. I watched many US Open matches and noticed the same thing.
My son & l were at Steinway as were you.
We stayed all day and observed most of the matches. Some stellar play by most players.

What we noticed was the comradery of the Taiwan players, as well as the same for the European players. The Filipinos have done this for years as well. Each rooting for their FRIEND!

Driving home my son says to me, Dad did you see how those players are friends first, they eat together, root for their countrymen. He says you never see the US players rooting for the other US guys.

My son then said Mark Wilson is trying to do that with the Mosconi cup guys.
Hopefully someday these things that Foriegn players do that work so well will rub off!

King T
11-04-2015, 10:18 PM
The truth is that many of the actions you see amongst the players from other countries also comes from the Love of the game and the respect given to other players that have achieved a certain level of play.

JAM
11-05-2015, 01:35 AM
Firstly, congratulations to my friend Kevin Cheng who won this yearís U.S. Open. He played great the entire event and deserved to win. He also recently came off a major tournament win in Beijing defeating Wu in the finals. Looks like he might just fire and starts winning everything.

401284


I also wanted to share my observations during the tournament. Living in America, we donít often get a chance to watch the players from Asia compete. So, I took this opportunity to watch their matches as often as I could. One match that stuck out to me was Chang Jung Lin vs Li He Wen. Li He Wen must have broke and ran about 7 racks that match, winning something like 11-3. He pretty much denied Chang much of an opportunity that match. The few balls he had to shoot, were long and awkward, and very hard to come with, especially being in the chair for so long. Another match was between Liu Hai Tao and Hsu Kai Lun. I believe Liu Hai Tao has a background in Chinese 8-ball. In my opinion, his mechanics are amazing, he has a snooker stance, and stroke has almost perfect timing. He is a tremendous shotmaker, but watching the way the he cued the ball, no shot really looked hard, everything looked routine, like a walk in the park. Liu Hai Tao denied Hsu Kai Lun many opportunities that set also. It seemed like that was a trend going on several matches, many great players lost because they were denied opportunities. Their opponents hardly missed balls and kept them in their chairs the majority of the match. One match I didnít see but I heard about was Justin Bergman playing Kevin Cheng. Kevin told me he must have broke and ran 6 racks, and Justin might have broke and ran 5, Kevin won 11-10. What really dawned upon me, is that at this level missing balls is a luxury. Top players donít expect to miss balls and return to the table, they expect to be punished for it every time, and usually expecting it to cost them a few games, and sometimes even the set.

What I also noticed is that these players really pride themselves in representing their country. For the most part, they are international players and represent their country everywhere they go, so they have some sense of patriotism. You also see this with the Filipinos a lot. If they win a tournament, they not only won for themselves, but also for their country. I feel that we donít see that attitude or pride so much with American players, maybe with the few exceptions such as: Van Boening, Strickland, and Archer. I wonder if the level of play in America would be stronger if the players prided themselves more in representing their country? This is just a thought that really stood out to me watching this event.

Sorry for the late post, but I still wanted to get this out.

Thank you,

Mike Wong

Very nice post. Thank you for sharing your thoughts and the photo of our new 2015 champion. :)

ibuycues
11-05-2015, 02:10 AM
Firstly, congratulations to my friend Kevin Cheng who won this yearís U.S. Open. He played great the entire event and deserved to win. He also recently came off a major tournament win in Beijing defeating Wu in the finals. Looks like he might just fire and starts winning everything.

401284


I also wanted to share my observations during the tournament. Living in America, we donít often get a chance to watch the players from Asia compete. So, I took this opportunity to watch their matches as often as I could. One match that stuck out to me was Chang Jung Lin vs Li He Wen. Li He Wen must have broke and ran about 7 racks that match, winning something like 11-3. He pretty much denied Chang much of an opportunity that match. The few balls he had to shoot, were long and awkward, and very hard to come with, especially being in the chair for so long. Another match was between Liu Hai Tao and Hsu Kai Lun. I believe Liu Hai Tao has a background in Chinese 8-ball. In my opinion, his mechanics are amazing, he has a snooker stance, and stroke has almost perfect timing. He is a tremendous shotmaker, but watching the way the he cued the ball, no shot really looked hard, everything looked routine, like a walk in the park. Liu Hai Tao denied Hsu Kai Lun many opportunities that set also. It seemed like that was a trend going on several matches, many great players lost because they were denied opportunities. Their opponents hardly missed balls and kept them in their chairs the majority of the match. One match I didnít see but I heard about was Justin Bergman playing Kevin Cheng. Kevin told me he must have broke and ran 6 racks, and Justin might have broke and ran 5, Kevin won 11-10. What really dawned upon me, is that at this level missing balls is a luxury. Top players donít expect to miss balls and return to the table, they expect to be punished for it every time, and usually expecting it to cost them a few games, and sometimes even the set.

What I also noticed is that these players really pride themselves in representing their country. For the most part, they are international players and represent their country everywhere they go, so they have some sense of patriotism. You also see this with the Filipinos a lot. If they win a tournament, they not only won for themselves, but also for their country. I feel that we donít see that attitude or pride so much with American players, maybe with the few exceptions such as: Van Boening, Strickland, and Archer. I wonder if the level of play in America would be stronger if the players prided themselves more in representing their country? This is just a thought that really stood out to me watching this event.

Sorry for the late post, but I still wanted to get this out.

Thank you,

Mike Wong

Mike,
I enjoyed your post and appreciate you taking the time to do it. I also enjoyed your insertion of the picture. Nice.

Will Prout

Rookie33
11-05-2015, 07:13 AM
Excellent view point on the differences between US players and others. I've often wondered if the US was able to provide a greater number of pro level - paid events or tours if it would inspire more solidarity in the US players since a monies would be more available outside of team/country based events.

Tobermory
11-05-2015, 10:00 AM
I'm seventy-three, and I grew up in a different pool room culture. Where I grew up, you didn't "root" for anybody--at least not visibly. Your guts might be grinding over a side bet, but you didn't visibly press for your man. Am I the only one who remembers this?

PoolBum
11-05-2015, 10:38 AM
I'm seventy-three, and I grew up in a different pool room culture. Where I grew up, you didn't "root" for anybody--at least not visibly. Your guts might be grinding over a side bet, but you didn't visibly press for your man. Am I the only one who remembers this?

That was certainly the pervading culture in the poolrooms of yesteryear when guys were trying to make a living playing for money. But then the question arises as to why the Filipino players are so different, since you would think that trying to make a living in the Philippines playing pool for money would be a pretty hardcore proposition.

Is it just a cultural difference between the Philippines and the U.S.?

onemorebrando
11-05-2015, 10:52 AM
When they are on foreign soil, and strangers in a strange land (as those you mentioned are here) I'm sure they feel like ambassadors and pull for their countrymen in much the same way.

JoeyA
11-05-2015, 11:07 AM
Mike,
Thank you for your observations about the event and the "chemistry" between some of the players.

To me, it is kind of natural to see the camaraderie between the foreign players. The players coming from Taiwan traveled a long way and they are in a foreign land, competing for a large sum of money. It is only natural for them to have a certain amount of patriotic fervor for one another. I'm sure when Shane, Hunter Lombardo and the other traveling American players are competing in a foreign country, they are supporting each other, eating with each other, etc.

I believe when they are competing against one another, they are just as vicious as any other professional player.

Still, with that being said, it's always nice to see players acting like professionals instead of prima donnas, no matter what country they are from.

Thanks again for your efforts at the U.S. Open. Hope you picked up some "secrets" from the Taiwanese crew. :wink:

JoeyA

Firstly, congratulations to my friend Kevin Cheng who won this yearís U.S. Open. He played great the entire event and deserved to win. He also recently came off a major tournament win in Beijing defeating Wu in the finals. Looks like he might just fire and starts winning everything.

401284


I also wanted to share my observations during the tournament. Living in America, we donít often get a chance to watch the players from Asia compete. So, I took this opportunity to watch their matches as often as I could. One match that stuck out to me was Chang Jung Lin vs Li He Wen. Li He Wen must have broke and ran about 7 racks that match, winning something like 11-3. He pretty much denied Chang much of an opportunity that match. The few balls he had to shoot, were long and awkward, and very hard to come with, especially being in the chair for so long. Another match was between Liu Hai Tao and Hsu Kai Lun. I believe Liu Hai Tao has a background in Chinese 8-ball. In my opinion, his mechanics are amazing, he has a snooker stance, and his stroke has almost perfect timing. He is a tremendous shotmaker, but watching the way the he cued the ball, no shot really looked hard, everything looked routine, like a walk in the park. Liu Hai Tao denied Hsu Kai Lun many opportunities that set also. It seemed like that was a trend going on several matches, many great players lost because they were denied opportunities. Their opponents hardly missed balls and kept them in their chairs the majority of the match. One match I didnít see but I heard about was Justin Bergman playing Kevin Cheng. Kevin told me he must have broke and ran 6 racks, and Justin might have broke and ran 5, Kevin won 11-10. What really dawned upon me, is that at this level missing balls is a luxury. Top players donít expect to miss balls and return to the table, they expect to be punished for it every time, and usually expecting it to cost them a few games, and sometimes even the set.

What I also noticed is that these players really pride themselves in representing their country. For the most part, they are international players and represent their country everywhere they go, so they have some sense of patriotism. You also see this with the Filipinos a lot. If they win a tournament, they not only won for themselves, but also for their country. I feel that we donít see that attitude or pride so much with American players, maybe with the few exceptions such as: Van Boening, Strickland, and Archer. I wonder if the level of play in America would be stronger if the players prided themselves more in representing their country? This is just a thought that really stood out to me watching this event.

Sorry for the late post, but I still wanted to get this out.

Thank you,

Mike Wong