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View Full Version : original vs refinish?


ludachris939
07-14-2016, 12:02 PM
I have and early 80s meucci cue and it has some scratches. Not sure if to sell it or refinish it? Does it lose value if i refinish it? Does it play differently?

Type79
07-14-2016, 02:08 PM
Billiards is the only community that prefers a refinished cue over one that is original albeit with a few scratches/dings i.e. patina.

It shouldn't be that way but it is, at least for the present time.

TATE
07-14-2016, 03:30 PM
I have and early 80s meucci cue and it has some scratches. Not sure if to sell it or refinish it? Does it lose value if i refinish it? Does it play differently?

Generally it adds value to refinish all but seriously historic collectors cues. There are many Meucci's out there. A refinish will not affect the way the cue plays.

Send it to Scot Sherbine and you'll get a better-than-new looking cue back in a few weeks at a reasonable price that you can play for many more years. You'll be glad you did.

poolguy4u
07-14-2016, 05:38 PM
I have and early 80s meucci cue and it has some scratches. Not sure if to sell it or refinish it? Does it lose value if i refinish it? Does it play differently?

:boring2:


Sell it the way it is. No use in putting $100 dollars into it for a refinish

when it only raises the value by $50 dollars.


:frown:


.

WildWing
07-15-2016, 05:00 PM
You'll get plenty of opinions, both for and against refinishing a cue. From over 40 years in this hobby, here are a few observations you might find useful.

For a relatively cheap cue, like a plain Meucci, it makes no difference at all what you do, other than what makes you feel good. You're not going to get a better price selling it with a refinish, so it's up to you whether to spend the money, or go on playing with it. You might like a more pristine looking cue. If that's the case, go ahead and refinish it. Or not.

On vintage, collectible cues, the opinions get a bit heated. Some are fine with refinishing to show the cue in its best light, and others are opposed to any alteration whatsoever. I can only guess the latter group still lives in candle-lit homes with an out-house in the backyard.

A good example would be the famous Balabushka Dove Cue, owned by Steve Mizerak. Refinished several times in its life, most recently by Dennis Searing, and shown on this forum. No negative comments here were ever given for its refinishing. Yet, when this subject comes up, some pipe up saying it's a sin to change anything original. Well, they're not very consistent, are they...

Refinishing (and repairing, when necessary) a cue is good; preserves the cue, keeps it playable when it has a fault, and presents the cue in its best light. It's also important that for a very valuable cue, a refinish be done by the highest talent there is, and there are several to choose from, depending on the cue. Bottom line, up to you, and your Meucci is not really in a class where it matters. But I hope this gives a bit of perspective, and does not come across as one-sided.

All the best,
WW

lfigueroa
07-15-2016, 05:03 PM
I have and early 80s meucci cue and it has some scratches. Not sure if to sell it or refinish it? Does it lose value if i refinish it? Does it play differently?


It's a Meucci, refinish it.

Lou Figueroa
has a 70's Meucci

HereWeGo
07-15-2016, 05:11 PM
+1 for team refinish.

428790

TNOriginals
07-21-2016, 03:26 PM
+1 for team refinish.

428790

Dangit I'm buying any of those you're selling!

Skratch
07-22-2016, 07:33 AM
You'll get plenty of opinions, both for and against refinishing a cue. From over 40 years in this hobby, here are a few observations you might find useful.

For a relatively cheap cue, like a plain Meucci, it makes no difference at all what you do, other than what makes you feel good. You're not going to get a better price selling it with a refinish, so it's up to you whether to spend the money, or go on playing with it. You might like a more pristine looking cue. If that's the case, go ahead and refinish it. Or not.

On vintage, collectible cues, the opinions get a bit heated. Some are fine with refinishing to show the cue in its best light, and others are opposed to any alteration whatsoever. I can only guess the latter group still lives in candle-lit homes with an out-house in the backyard.

A good example would be the famous Balabushka Dove Cue, owned by Steve Mizerak. Refinished several times in its life, most recently by Dennis Searing, and shown on this forum. No negative comments here were ever given for its refinishing. Yet, when this subject comes up, some pipe up saying it's a sin to change anything original. Well, they're not very consistent, are they...

Refinishing (and repairing, when necessary) a cue is good; preserves the cue, keeps it playable when it has a fault, and presents the cue in its best light. It's also important that for a very valuable cue, a refinish be done by the highest talent there is, and there are several to choose from, depending on the cue. Bottom line, up to you, and your Meucci is not really in a class where it matters. But I hope this gives a bit of perspective, and does not come across as one-sided.

All the best,
WW

I think collectors who are looking to preserve the history of the item (cue) would rather keep the original state. Collectors in it for the monetary value will probably want to have it refinished with the intent of reselling at a later date. Players will probably want to have it refinished, so they can use it. Who likes the dings in their cues?!

OP: if your intent is to resell it, then the best money would probably come from a collector who wants to preserve the historical value of it in its original conditions. Don't refinish it. These buyers may not be as prominent as the other buyers, but they'll also most likely spend more to get it. If you want a quick sell, then you'll find more buyers who would probably want it refinished. Putting the money into getting it done may not be worth the cost adjustment when selling.