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View Full Version : What is the most neglected aspect in amateur pool?


Ghosst
08-03-2017, 11:53 AM
Fitness?
Practice?
Fundamentals?
Kicking?
Something else perhaps?

drv4
08-03-2017, 12:21 PM
Fundamentals... both with stroke and knowledge of the game. When I first started playing 4 years ago I remember what an eye opening moment it was for me to understand how the cueball reacted differently with roll and stun. The game is so much easier when you can do two things 1. Hit whitey where you are aiming consistently and 2. Know where whitey is going after contact with the OB.

mchnhed
08-03-2017, 12:30 PM
What is the most neglected aspect in amateur pool?

Support.
Encouragement.
Getting non-players to play.
Getting New Players to buy a cue.
Locally Available Pool Lessons.
Startup programs for new players.
Youth programs.

Learning the Fundamentals.
Doing Fundamental Drills.
Practicing the Fundamentals.
Using the Fundamentals.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Start with the fundamentals.

Study the table.
Find the aim line.
Commit to a shot.
Stop Thinking.
Stance.
Grip.
Bridge.
Stroke.
Sight OB to Pocket Last.
Shoot.
Follow Though.
Remain down.
Observe the action of the balls.
Analyze.
Correct.
Relax.
Have Fun.

***Insert "Relax & Have Fun" between each step.***

Do simple one shot drills to see your faults.
Up and Back to cue tip. Straight Shots. Length of table.
Up and Back with 1 Tip English, Left/Right 1 diamond.
Stroke & Follow through using the rack spot.

Ralph Kramden
08-03-2017, 12:35 PM
Focus.... Look at the eyes of most good players... their eyes are glued to the shot... They are like a predator.
Amateur players sometimes aren't focused at all. Jumping up, banging balls, and looking around.. Like prey.

.

michael4
08-03-2017, 12:52 PM
Fitness?
Practice?
Fundamentals?
Kicking?
Something else perhaps?

position play and basic strategy.
I see many amateurs who are decent shot makers, but they make little effort to leave the CB in shape for the next shot, and have no clue about defense or what I consider basic strategy.....

cuenut
08-03-2017, 12:55 PM
Fundamentals related to stance, bridge, etc., followed closely by understanding of interaction between a cueball and object ball; and the ability to aim properly.

garczar
08-03-2017, 04:07 PM
The basics. Get on YT and watch all the snooker lessons. Cut thru all the crap and don't develop bad habits.

pt109
08-03-2017, 04:24 PM
Most neglected aspect?.......accuracy...without it you will always be rolling the dice.

You can run the table with no position...you can't run it if you don't make a ball.

realkingcobra
08-03-2017, 04:46 PM
Fitness?
Practice?
Fundamentals?
Kicking?
Something else perhaps?

Over looking the fact that most amateur pool players play pool just to have some fun, and people that PLAY pool want to spoil their fun by insisting they learn to play pool like a pool player, then getting upset when they find out....they really don't care, they are just out with their friends having fun.

"you can make a jackass out of a race horse, but you can't make a race horse out of a jackass" so here's the big question for you. Why does there have to be something wrong with nust playing pool cor fun? And, why does every person who picks up a cue stick, need to learn how to draw the cue ball back 2 feet or it's percieved that they MUST need lessons to learn to play better....so they'll be able to have fun....as pool players?

couldnthinkof01
08-03-2017, 04:47 PM
Deodorant with consistent p.s.r coming in a close second.

realkingcobra
08-03-2017, 05:02 PM
Fitness?
Practice?
Fundamentals?
Kicking?
Something else perhaps?

See, here's the real deal, if pool don't get fixed so that the top pro's can make a decent living as a PRO, then why worry about the amateurs learning to play pool? I mean, with no possible future to look forward to as a PRO, why worry about bringing in new players....to support pool leagues?

mchnhed
08-03-2017, 05:04 PM
Over looking the fact that most amateur pool players play pool just to have some fun, and people that PLAY pool want to spoil their fun by insisting they learn to play pool like a pool player, then getting upset when they find out....they really don't care, they are just out with their friends having fun.

"you can make a jackass out of a race horse, but you can't make a race horse out of a jackass" so here's the big question for you. Why does there have to be something wrong with nust playing pool cor fun? And, why does every person who picks up a cue stick, need to learn how to draw the cue ball back 2 feet or it's percieved that they MUST need lessons to learn to play better....so they'll be able to have fun....as pool players?
I agree with what you are saying about some people just want to have fun playing Pool, but......
Wouldn't a friendly, welcoming Pool Room with "Free Lessons for Beginners" get those Ball Bangers to feel more comfortable so that they come back to play more often?
First timers want to be shown the ropes of rules, language and pool table etiquette.
They don't have to join a league, just become repeat offenders, I mean customers!

pocketsplitter
08-03-2017, 05:08 PM
See, here's the real deal, if pool don't get fixed so that the top pro's can make a decent living as a PRO, then why worry about the amateurs learning to play pool? I mean, with no possible future to look forward to as a PRO, why worry about bringing in new players....to support pool leagues?



That's the problem though. Pros need new players and admirers in order to make money. There will only be admirers if they know the game outside of broken bar boxes and dive bars, otherwise they'll think efren isn't good because he never had to make a tough shot, ie, he had the cue ball on a string. When you can sell out Madison square garden on $80+ tickets...that's when ppl like efren will make millions a year


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realkingcobra
08-03-2017, 05:09 PM
I agree with what you are saying about some people just want to have fun playing Pool, but......
Wouldn't a friendly, welcoming Pool Room with "Free Lessons for Beginners" get those Ball Bangers to feel more comfortable so that they come back to play more often?
First timers want to be shown the ropes of rules, language and pool table etiquette.
They don't have to join a league, just become repeat offenders, I mean customers!

If that sign said "free golf lessons" the line would be down the street and around the corner!

mchnhed
08-03-2017, 05:11 PM
If that sign said "free golf lessons" the line would be down the street and around the corner!
Sadly, I agree.
We had the same problem in Bowling.
Look where Brunswick Bowling is now.
SOLD

realkingcobra
08-03-2017, 05:12 PM
That's the problem though. Pros need new players and admirers in order to make money. There will only be admirers if they know the game outside of broken bar boxes and dive bars, otherwise they'll think efren isn't good because he never had to make a tough shot, ie, he had the cue ball on a string. When you can sell out Madison square garden on $80+ tickets...that's when ppl like efren will make millions a year


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Hmmmm....and in the mean time, Pro's are dropping out like flys getting sprayed with raid....because they can't make shit for a living unless they're in the top 4 in this country.....not to exciting for the new players if you ask me.

realkingcobra
08-03-2017, 05:21 PM
Pros need new players and admirers in order to make money.
Sent from my iPhone using AzBilliards Forums (http://r.tapatalk.com/byo?rid=87673)

No, cue stick, cloth, chalk, pool ball, pool table.....manufactures ALL need new Pro's to drink the Kool-Aid to replace the pros that are getting sick of the taste of the kool-aid-piss and are quitting playing....because nothings changing, and without NEW Pro's to replace them, how is this industry going to keep prospering....selling it's goods to everyone NOT a Pro!

Ghosst
08-03-2017, 05:29 PM
snip ...so here's the big question for you. Why does there have to be something wrong with nust playing pool cor fun? And, why does every person who picks up a cue stick, need to learn how to draw the cue ball back 2 feet or it's percieved that they MUST need lessons to learn to play better....so they'll be able to have fun....as pool players?

The question is intended to bring about intelligent debate. I have the answers of a few pro players to this very question that I will post later. People might enjoy their thoughts, especially the lurkers who sit back quietly and read the posts without wanting to answer themselves and instead rely on us. Quite a few of our members are short-stop speed or better so their insight is valuable.

As a group, we can answer the same questions with decreasing patience and forget that people new to the sport may not use the search function at all, only peruse the latest online arguments and believe this is all we are. So now and then, it's worth revisiting questions that might have an impact on their play.

pocketsplitter
08-03-2017, 05:58 PM
Hmmmm....and in the mean time, Pro's are dropping out like flys getting sprayed with raid....because they can't make shit for a living unless they're in the top 4 in this country.....not to exciting for the new players if you ask me.



And hence the viscous cycle.


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hotelyorba
08-04-2017, 12:17 AM
Hmmmm....and in the mean time, Pro's are dropping out like flys getting sprayed with raid....because they can't make shit for a living unless they're in the top 4 in this country.....not to exciting for the new players if you ask me.

So new players should only be interested and excited about pool if there is a whole bunch of money to be made? Can't it just be because it's fun to play pool? Just as a hobby, as a fun passtime, whatever?

Also: if there's more people loving the game, more people will come to tournaments to watch - that generates money and is interesting for sponsors because now they can reach more people at these events. I realize we wouldn't get great big masses of people to attend, it would never be nearly enough for pool to be considered a 'big viewer sport' or anything - but still. For anything to happen, we need more interested people there.

To answer OP's original question: I think one neglected aspect in amateur pool that hasn't been mentioned yet, is "don't think you're done learning the game once you're consistently winning games against that one buddy or once you think you've seen and made every possible angle on the table".

I've seen that many times: someone gets his own cue and starts playing a lot, and within 6 months or so they made balls in every angle possible, because there aren't that many. They are now King of Pool, must be some talent to be able to do that afte such a short period of time!

The line of reasoning now becomes: "I can make every ball, because I've done it before" and they don't expect to ever miss again. When they do, they soon learn to blame some external aspect: the table is off, the balls... something with the balls, the chalk too and someone was walking in my line of sight.

Guess what I'm saying is: you're never done learning in this game, so be as precise as you can. Always mind all the little details. And know that you and you alone are responsible for failure, as well as success.

realkingcobra
08-04-2017, 02:30 AM
So new players should only be interested and excited about pool if there is a whole bunch of money to be made? Can't it just be because it's fun to play pool? Just as a hobby, as a fun passtime, whatever?
I bet it was a hell of an adventure taking that first cruise on the Titanic, until it hit that damn iceberg and the people realized, we're dying now. Meaning, no Pro's playing anymore in the US, no more tournaments, no more tournaments, sales to the masses fall off, but yes....we can still have some fun....asking what happened?

CGM
08-04-2017, 04:45 AM
Equating the health of amateur pool to the health of professional pool is silly. I think, yes, professional sports in general give a certain level of exposure to the sport but 99.999% of people that play any sport have no intention of becoming a pro. I never played golf because the PGA exists. All that professional sports do for the western amateur is serve to sell the latest and greatest apparel and equipment. The sport would not die altogether without a pro league.

buckets
08-04-2017, 07:46 AM
See, here's the real deal, if pool don't get fixed so that the top pro's can make a decent living as a PRO, then why worry about the amateurs learning to play pool? I mean, with no possible future to look forward to as a PRO, why worry about bringing in new players....to support pool leagues?
more pros, more purses

more amateurs, more pros

more players, more amateurs

more bangers getting into the "real" game, more players

realkingcobra
08-04-2017, 08:00 AM
more pros, more purses

more amateurs, more pros

more players, more amateurs

more bangers getting into the "real" game, more players

Now you're getting the picture...LOL

realkingcobra
08-04-2017, 08:05 AM
Equating the health of amateur pool to the health of professional pool is silly. I think, yes, professional sports in general give a certain level of exposure to the sport but 99.999% of people that play any sport have no intention of becoming a pro. I never played golf because the PGA exists. All that professional sports do for the western amateur is serve to sell the latest and greatest apparel and equipment. The sport would not die altogether without a pro league.

Pro's are used for advertising a sport. No pro's, no advertising, no advertising, no sales, no sales....no incentive for manufacturing to get involved. No industry support....no sport....it really is that simple!

mchnhed
08-04-2017, 08:21 AM
more pros, more purses

more amateurs, more pros

more players, more amateurs

more bangers getting into the "real" game, more players
You Have It Bass Acwards.

More Friendly Pool Community & Pool Rooms, More Ball Bangers.

More Ball Bangers, More Regulars.

More Regulars, More Amateurs.

More Amateurs, More Leagues & More Cue Sales.

More Leagues, More Local Tournaments.

More Local Tournaments, More Talent.

More Talent, More Pros.

More Pros, More Money.

CGM
08-04-2017, 08:22 AM
I would venture to guess that most people that play couldnt name one pro.

MitchAlsup
08-04-2017, 08:36 AM
I fail to see why pro pool players think pool owes them a living?

mchnhed
08-04-2017, 08:48 AM
I would venture to guess that most people that play couldnt name one pro.
Minnesota Fats?
http://www.thehypertexts.com/Minnesota%20Fats%20Overrated%20Pool%20Billiards.ht m

CGM
08-04-2017, 08:50 AM
Pro's are used for advertising a sport. No pro's, no advertising, no advertising, no sales, no sales....no incentive for manufacturing to get involved. No industry support....no sport....it really is that simple!

I just dont see how you can attribute the entirety of the well being of pool on the backs of the existence of professionals. I promise you that if professional pool players ceased to exist today just as many people would play pool tomorrow.

BC21
08-04-2017, 09:03 AM
position play and basic strategy.
I see many amateurs who are decent shot makers, but they make little effort to leave the CB in shape for the next shot, and have no clue about defense or what I consider basic strategy.....

I agree. Many times the only difference between a good shot-making bar banger and a fine-tuned poolhall player is their ability to learn and play position, patterns, and overall strategy.

Bavafongoul
08-04-2017, 09:23 AM
All too common nowadays it's good manners & sportsmanship.

poolguy4u
08-04-2017, 09:24 AM
:boring2:



Actually there are amateurs out there that are better than so called professionals.


Those amateurs have real jobs and aren't afraid to work for a living.


Forty years ago every big town had a hand full. ....They were good but just didn't leave the porch.



:thumbup:




.

realkingcobra
08-04-2017, 11:22 AM
I just dont see how you can attribute the entirety of the well being of pool on the backs of the existence of professionals. I promise you that if professional pool players ceased to exist today just as many people would play pool tomorrow.

Just imagine if there was no "professional's" representing any type of sports being played. Would baseball cease to exist after little league? Would football end after high school? How about basketball, no need for a scholarships if there's no where to play after collage right?

buckets
08-04-2017, 11:31 AM
You Have It Bass Acwards.

More Friendly Pool Community & Pool Rooms, More Ball Bangers.

More Ball Bangers, More Regulars.

More Regulars, More Amateurs.

More Amateurs, More Leagues & More Cue Sales.

More Leagues, More Local Tournaments.

More Local Tournaments, More Talent.

More Talent, More Pros.

More Pros, More Money.

I'm a back-asswards kinda guy haha

Glad you got my point though!

JoeyInCali
08-04-2017, 11:42 AM
Equating the health of amateur pool to the health of professional pool is silly. I think, yes, professional sports in general give a certain level of exposure to the sport but 99.999% of people that play any sport have no intention of becoming a pro. I never played golf because the PGA exists. All that professional sports do for the western amateur is serve to sell the latest and greatest apparel and equipment. The sport would not die altogether without a pro league.

It is.
Nobody cares about pro women's soccer or softball.
The participation in those sports is healthy.

Would bass fishing die without pro-bass fishing contest ? No.

Most APA and BCA bangers don't even know SVB.

Ghosst
08-04-2017, 11:56 AM
Back on the actual topic:

From both in person and recorded interviews, commentary, and lessons, here's what I've gathered from several pros or top-level amateurs on what the average player should be working on if they want to improve their game:

Johnny Archer______Fundamentals & cue ball aim
Shane VanBoening__Practice & cue ball control
Jason Shaw _______Fundamentals / Drills
Ronnie Alcano______Fundamentals / Drills
Bustamante________Cue ball control
Efren Reyes________*spin* (wasn't specific, but from what I could gather)
Earl Strickland______Position
Tor Lowry__________Fundamentals
Bob Jewett_________Fundamentals
Dave Alciatore______Fundamentals
Mark Griffin ________Pattern Play
Ken Schuman ______Pattern Play
Corey Deuel _______Delivery (cue ball aim)
John Schmidt_______Delivery (HAMB / making the shot)

Since their observations are sometimes several years passed, they may have changed their mind slightly and are welcome to correct the list.

MapleMan
08-05-2017, 08:36 AM
I think its safety play. I think we find ways to stand and make balls that work but suffer from attempting shots that give the other guy the table. I am not a runout player by any means but i see the value in bih and can get out with a favorable layout. Pattern play i think is number 2. It helps us plan ahead and know the odds of getting out or playing safe.

tonythetiger583
08-05-2017, 10:35 AM
I think its safety play. I think we find ways to stand and make balls that work but suffer from attempting shots that give the other guy the table. I am not a runout player by any means but i see the value in bih and can get out with a favorable layout. Pattern play i think is number 2. It helps us plan ahead and know the odds of getting out or playing safe.

I think in the long run, if you have good fundamentals, good potting abilities, and good pattern play, it seems important to be more aggressive. Not all safeties are created equal, and if you're opponent can just jump or kick out of it, you'll wish you had that 50/50 shot you dismissed a second ago. Safety-ing definitely has it's place, and I love a good safety as much as the next guy, but I'd much rather not let the guy back to the table.

When I miss a low percentage shot, it's seems more constructive to examine the chain of events that led me to that low percentage shot. Usually it was poor planning on my part a couple shots ago.

Your win percentage will definitely suffer if you're just trying to get out all the time, and if you don't have the skills to actually back it up. And it's a blurred line between playing super aggressively to improve, and just being a banger.

Also to add to the discussion, I feel like it's failure to try new things and sticking to what's comfortable that is a key part of amateur pool. The other is thinking that every skill stacks neatly on top of another, and the road is straight forward. You don't learn a perfect stroke on day 1, and if your stroke sucks, it won't just magically become perfect with ton's of play.

I think real improvement involves a lot of re-examination of your current skill sets, and how new information effects it. A lot of two steps forward, one step back type stuff. You have to be willing to overhaul or revise stuff (but not pointlessly).

tonythetiger583
08-05-2017, 10:45 AM
I think the other skill that's really important is honest evaluation of you're skill. Being able to see where you're lacking and taking the necessary steps to genuinely improve it to a satisfactory level. Also actually diagnosing problems at their roots instead of treating the symptom. ex: Instead of trying to force yourself to stay down on a shot, asking yourself why you may be jumping up in the first place.

MapleMan
08-05-2017, 01:14 PM
I think in the long run, if you have good fundamentals, good potting abilities, and good pattern play, it seems important to be more aggressive. Not all safeties are created equal, and if you're opponent can just jump or kick out of it, you'll wish you had that 50/50 shot you dismissed a second ago. Safety-ing definitely has it's place, and I love a good safety as much as the next guy, but I'd much rather not let the guy back to the table.

When I miss a low percentage shot, it's seems more constructive to examine the chain of events that led me to that low percentage shot. Usually it was poor planning on my part a couple shots ago.

Your win percentage will definitely suffer if you're just trying to get out all the time, and if you don't have the skills to actually back it up. And it's a blurred line between playing super aggressively to improve, and just being a banger.

Also to add to the discussion, I feel like it's failure to try new things and sticking to what's comfortable that is a key part of amateur pool. The other is thinking that every skill stacks neatly on top of another, and the road is straight forward. You don't learn a perfect stroke on day 1, and if your stroke sucks, it won't just magically become perfect with ton's of play.

I think real improvement involves a lot of re-examination of your current skill sets, and how new information effects it. A lot of two steps forward, one step back type stuff. You have to be willing to overhaul or revise stuff (but not pointlessly).

I agree that we should strive to improve being able to run out but i think amateurs often neglect playing a safe at the right time. A great player will get out and maybe even make the shot does not mean it was wrong to play a safe. In my experience in these moments i take the ill advised shot and suffer

sixpack
08-05-2017, 01:33 PM
If that sign said "free golf lessons" the line would be down the street and around the corner!

Our golf course offers free lessons once a week. Very seldom do people show up.

mchnhed
08-05-2017, 03:10 PM
Our golf course offers free lessons once a week. Very seldom do people show up.
This may because people do not know of the lessons or may feel they don't need lessons.
Sometimes you have to create a perception of need.
Could be a lack of promotion.
Just because you offer a service or product most people will need to have it handed to them on silver platter and even then may not use the opportunity.

sixpack
08-05-2017, 03:32 PM
This may because people do not know of the lessons or may feel they don't need lessons.
Sometimes you have to create a perception of need.
Could be a lack of promotion.
Just because you offer a service or product most people will need to have it handed to them on silver platter and even then may not use the opportunity.

The only reason I posted that is because I see a general trend in our society where it's difficult to get people to do anything. So much of the average person's attention and interest is locked up in social media and the spin from big companies that it is hard for a delayed gratification pursuit - such as golf, pool or bowling - to get the public's attention.

Ralph Kramden
08-05-2017, 03:32 PM
Our golf course offers free lessons once a week. Very seldom do people show up.

People think a 1 time lesson will make them a golfer... and then don't practice.
People think a pill is all that is needed to lose weight... and then eat too much.

Pool is the same.. People think playing once a week is all it takes to play well.

.

JohnnyOzone
08-05-2017, 04:57 PM
position play and basic strategy.
I see many amateurs who are decent shot makers, but they make little effort to leave the CB in shape for the next shot, and have no clue about defense or what I consider basic strategy.....

I totally agree with this, and I think strategy is so bad because of the ball count system of scorekeeping in most leagues. Trains newer players to play totally the wrong way, and most of them never change.

JohnnyOzone
08-05-2017, 05:03 PM
You Have It Bass Acwards.

More Friendly Pool Community & Pool Rooms, More Ball Bangers.

More Ball Bangers, More Regulars.

More Regulars, More Amateurs.

More Amateurs, More Leagues & More Cue Sales.

More Leagues, More Local Tournaments.

More Local Tournaments, More Talent.

More Talent, More Pros.

More Pros, More Money.


I don't see how you go from "more pros" to 'more money"

realkingcobra
08-05-2017, 07:37 PM
I don't see how you go from "more pros" to 'more money"

Other way around, more money equates to more Pro's :thumbup:

mchnhed
08-05-2017, 10:20 PM
I don't see how you go from "more pros" to 'more money"
Other way around, more money equates to more Pro's :thumbup:
Doesn't more contestants mean larger purses?

jasonlaus
08-05-2017, 10:43 PM
Over looking the fact that most amateur pool players play pool just to have some fun, and people that PLAY pool want to spoil their fun by insisting they learn to play pool like a pool player, then getting upset when they find out....they really don't care, they are just out with their friends having fun.

"you can make a jackass out of a race horse, but you can't make a race horse out of a jackass" so here's the big question for you. Why does there have to be something wrong with nust playing pool cor fun? And, why does every person who picks up a cue stick, need to learn how to draw the cue ball back 2 feet or it's percieved that they MUST need lessons to learn to play better....so they'll be able to have fun....as pool players?

Your best post ever:thumbup:
Jason

jasonlaus
08-05-2017, 10:46 PM
I agree with what you are saying about some people just want to have fun playing Pool, but......
Wouldn't a friendly, welcoming Pool Room with "Free Lessons for Beginners" get those Ball Bangers to feel more comfortable so that they come back to play more often?
First timers want to be shown the ropes of rules, language and pool table etiquette.
They don't have to join a league, just become repeat offenders, I mean customers!

3 things men will never admit they are not good at - sex, directions, and pool.
Jason

realkingcobra
08-06-2017, 07:01 AM
Doesn't more contestants mean larger purses?

No, that just means more players are playing for their own money back, kind of like playing in a ring game, and has nothing to do with professional pool.

smashmouth
08-06-2017, 07:53 AM
imo,

cueball control over the vertical axis including but not limited to medium - long range stun run through

if I had to pick one thing in all things pool it would be the above

chefjeff
08-06-2017, 08:13 AM
Fitness?
Practice?
Fundamentals?
Kicking?
Something else perhaps?

The myth, promoted by movies and tv, that this game can be mastered in just a short period of time.

When Fast Eddie told Vincent that he needed to quit his job and go on the road a few months before the tournament to get some seasoning, Vincent was bewildered why it would take so long. I was laughing inside that movie goers would think such improvements could happen in such a short period as a few months.


Jeff Livingston

onepocketron
08-06-2017, 08:17 AM
Fundamentals in my view. I can't tell you how many folks I see doing all manner of things that cause them to screw up.

The thing I see most, is coming up off the shot, what I call "jumping up". Most don't even realize they are doing it as they have been doing it for so long, it feels normal to raise up as they are delivering the stick to the cue ball.

If you want to know if your fundamentals are good, video yourself for a while. The camera doesn't lie. If you are raising up during the forward stroke, don't expect to make balls consistently, and be prepared to miss a lot of easy shots.

Scott Lee
08-06-2017, 08:42 AM
Might as well add a few more names...

Jerry Briesath_______Fundamentals & stroke
Randy Goettlicher____Fundamentals & stroke
Scott Lee___________Fundamentals & stroke
Denny Stewart______Fundamentals & stroke
Mark Finkelstein_____Fundamentals & stroke

Getting the picture? :thumbup:

Scott Lee
http://poolknowledge.com

Back on the actual topic:

From both in person and recorded interviews, commentary, and lessons, here's what I've gathered from several pros or top-level amateurs on what the average player should be working on if they want to improve their game:

Johnny Archer______Fundamentals & cue ball aim
Shane VanBoening__Practice & cue ball control
Jason Shaw _______Fundamentals / Drills
Ronnie Alcano______Fundamentals / Drills
Bustamante________Cue ball control
Efren Reyes________*spin* (wasn't specific, but from what I could gather)
Earl Strickland______Position
Tor Lowry__________Fundamentals
Bob Jewett_________Fundamentals
Dave Alciatore______Fundamentals
Mark Griffin ________Pattern Play
Ken Schuman ______Pattern Play
Corey Deuel _______Delivery (cue ball aim)
John Schmidt_______Delivery (HAMB / making the shot)

Since their observations are sometimes several years passed, they may have changed their mind slightly and are welcome to correct the list.

Ghosst
08-07-2017, 08:23 AM
Might as well add a few more names...

Getting the picture? :thumbup:

I should have added Rodney Morris (Fundamentals) and Mike Page (Fundamentals) too. Seems there might be a trend in improving your game.

I came off a long layoff and have been working on remembering to approach every shot the same way, whether it's a half-ball safety or a 3-rail one-pocket shot. It's not like riding a bike at all, and for the moment I still have a very mechanical PSR but it's becoming a routine and not a checklist.