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vjmehra
08-04-2017, 02:30 PM
So I have a garden room that is 5.28m x 4.27m (which I think is 17ft 4 inches x 14ft), so in simple terms would you go for an 8 footer or a 7 footer.

I'm not a fan of using short cues, so I'd probably go smaller if that was likely. In terms of theory it looks like I'm right on the edge of an 8 footer being viable, so am looking to see if anyone has any real world experience.

In terms of tournaments...I'm based in the UK and the only tournaments are on 9 footers, so neither are ideal, but thats okay I expect to only really play socially these days anyway.

Also, it doesn't make much difference perhaps, but as its marginal, at some point we are likely to expand the house at which point if I had a 7 footer I would definitely trade up to a 9, whereas if I already had an 8 footer I might be tempted to keep it.

I'm leaning more towards the smaller table, but would anyone consider an 8 footer with that room size, or is it just likely to result in to many awkward shots?

jrctherake
08-04-2017, 05:04 PM
So I have a garden room that is 5.28m x 4.27m (which I think is 17ft 4 inches x 14ft), so in simple terms would you go for an 8 footer or a 7 footer.

I'm not a fan of using short cues, so I'd probably go smaller if that was likely. In terms of theory it looks like I'm right on the edge of an 8 footer being viable, so am looking to see if anyone has any real world experience.

In terms of tournaments...I'm based in the UK and the only tournaments are on 9 footers, so neither are ideal, but thats okay I expect to only really play socially these days anyway.

Also, it doesn't make much difference perhaps, but as its marginal, at some point we are likely to expand the house at which point if I had a 7 footer I would definitely trade up to a 9, whereas if I already had an 8 footer I might be tempted to keep it.

I'm leaning more towards the smaller table, but would anyone consider an 8 footer with that room size, or is it just likely to result in to many awkward shots?

First off.........it must be nice to have plenty of 9' table tournaments. Here there are tons of tiny table tournaments but very, very few big table tournaments.

As far as your question:

If you are 100% certain that your going to make room for a 8 or 9 foot table in the near future then it is a no brainer if you favor a big table over tiny tables.......get a 9 ft table and live with the limited space until you have more room to play with.

Otherwise..........bite the bullet and get use to playing on a tiny table at your house and then make the adjustment to the big table when you go out.

Bottom line:

1. Make sure of remodel or different house...etc...etc.. = know what your space will be long term.

2. refer back to 1.

vjmehra
08-05-2017, 04:04 AM
First off.........it must be nice to have plenty of 9' table tournaments. Here there are tons of tiny table tournaments but very, very few big table tournaments.

As far as your question:

If you are 100% certain that your going to make room for a 8 or 9 foot table in the near future then it is a no brainer if you favor a big table over tiny tables.......get a 9 ft table and live with the limited space until you have more room to play with.

Otherwise..........bite the bullet and get use to playing on a tiny table at your house and then make the adjustment to the big table when you go out.

Bottom line:

1. Make sure of remodel or different house...etc...etc.. = know what your space will be long term.

2. refer back to 1.

Well I think its because we have our own version of 'small pool' with our 7 foot English tables, there are a couple of tours, loads of leagues and regular competitions on those, but for US pool its exclusively played on 9 footers.

We have one national tour, one high profile regional tour (in the south of the country) and then in London at least a few local tournaments.

That said, I haven't played competitively for a few years now!

In terms of re-modelling, its probably about 2 years away, although space won't be a problem then I don't think I can live with short cues for that long :-)

So my thoughts were either a cheap 7 footer that I then get rid of or perhaps a slightly nicer 8 footer that I keep, but it really depends how frustrating the 8 footer would be!

mchnhed
08-05-2017, 07:18 AM
So I have a garden room that is.......
17ft 4 inches x 14ft

A 9' foot American Pool Table is.........
9' + 5' + 5' = 19'
4' 6" + 5' + 5' = 14' 6"'
19' x 14' 6"

You're shy by 1' 8" total or 10" each end.
Short only 3" on each side.

If you are really going to remodel.....
Get the 9 foot and place it with 10" more space at the head end where you break.
The rack goes on the foot spot.

Cornerman
08-05-2017, 10:11 AM
So I have a garden room that is.......
17ft 4 inches x 14ft

A 9' foot American Pool Table is.........
9' + 5' + 5' = 19'
4.5 + 5' + 5' = 14.5'
19' x 14.5'



.
By adding 10' to each length and width as you've done, you've actually added 4" less to the width versus the length.

I'm sure that's not yours or anyone else's intention and that the intent would be to give dimensions that provided equal stroke length as an ideal space recommendation. A 4" difference (2" per side) is substantial, don't you think?

For a 9' table, if you're going to suggest 19' as the length requirement, then the corresponding width is 14' 10".

Freddie <~~~ 101

iusedtoberich
08-05-2017, 10:23 AM
IMO, we should do away with all feet measurements when dealing with room sizes, and only use inches. US based tape measures all have inches on them. The feet is an extra and unnecessary conversion.

(Unless in the metric system like the OP)

runout1961
08-08-2017, 11:44 AM
Easiest way I've always figured out if a room was big enough is real simple. Too many sites out there with "room size requirements" that give bad information. I'll use a 9' table as an example.

Playing field 50"x100"
58" cue on both sides
Back swing of 7" on both sides

So, length is 100" plus 58" cue on both sides plus 7" of backswing on both sides equals 230".

Width is 50" plus 58" on both sides plus 7" of backswing on both sides equals 180".

So, minimum space requirement for a 9' table is 230"x180". Not including chairs and everything else.

Easy.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

mchnhed
08-08-2017, 12:18 PM
So I have a garden room that is
5.28m x 4.27m = 207" x 168"

Need 230" x 180" for a 9' American Pool Table.

Short by 23" x 12" = .58m x .31m

Kinda short on the ends.
Not too bad on the sides.

I still say..... get the 9' if you are going to remodel.
Place the one end you break from farther from the wall by 6" or 16cm.

Damn, why did President Reagan vote against changing over to the Metric System!
Metrics is so much easier to use!
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metrication_in_the_United_States

michael4
08-08-2017, 02:18 PM
So I have a garden room that is 5.28m x 4.27m (which I think is 17ft 4 inches x 14ft), so in simple terms would you go for an 8 footer or a 7 footer.

I'm not a fan of using short cues

since you are not a fan of short cues, it clear to me you want the 7 foot table (for now).....the "5 feet all around" rule is the minimum needed, you will still bump the wall on occasion and feel cramped.....

MitchAlsup
08-08-2017, 03:30 PM
So I have a garden room that is 5.28m x 4.27m (which I think is 17ft 4 inches x 14ft), so in simple terms would you go for an 8 footer or a 7 footer.

I have an 8 foot table in a room that is similarly dimensioned.

Yes, it is a bit short.

I alleviate that with a rule that:: after you have declared a shot, you can move the CB from near the rail to the first diamond along the line of the declared shot, and shoot from there. No short cues needed.

Overall it works just fine with that "home" rule. AND it is much better to play on a 8 footer than a 7 footer by enough to accommodate the aforementioned rule. Over time you get so used to the room that you seldom end up leaving the CB in the zone where you need to use the rule.

Ralph Kramden
08-08-2017, 03:48 PM
I'd say for a 9' table your room should be 15'x20'
You'll never be happy with less using short cues.

.