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DrCue'sProtege
08-12-2017, 08:06 AM
Can anyone tell me what years the Sands Reno Open was held? Its my understanding it started around 1985 and finished around 1999, but I could be mistaken. And didn't they run it twice a year, in early June and then early December?

I miss the Sands Reno Open. A lot of good Accu-Stats videos were made there. A lot of good matches too.

Any chance this tournament somehow gets resurrected?

r/DCP

garczar
08-12-2017, 10:42 AM
'85 was first year and iirc 2008 was last yr. Mike Davis won that event.(Googled that fact). Don't know if they played in '09 or not. Jay H. will know for sure. Where you at Jay?? Need a lil' help here.

westcoast
08-12-2017, 12:39 PM
Speaking of the Sands, I don't think I've ever seen a pro player play worse than Hopkins did in this match

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b93Al9PQqlM

garczar
08-12-2017, 02:07 PM
Speaking of the Sands, I don't think I've ever seen a pro player play worse than Hopkins did in this match

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b93Al9PQqlMHe looked a tad intimidated to me. Playing ER then was like batting against Bob Gibson in his prime. ANY mistake got severely punished.

westcoast
08-12-2017, 09:41 PM
He looked a tad intimidated to me. Playing ER then was like batting against Bob Gibson in his prime. ANY mistake got severely punished.

I agree. Hopkins is a hall of fame player and I was very surprised to see him play that poorly- perhaps he was a bit intimidated

Justin Bergman
08-12-2017, 10:27 PM
Sands was a great tournament... $100 or maybe $150 entry and $15,000 for 1st, cheap rooms, and they kept the tourn room open 24/7. All best of all it was on 9ft. First year I went was with J Hall we were both 16 or 17, I just got my license...We gambled whole way there almost died twice driving in snowstorm. As soon as I get there I played a guy I didn't know for $500 and it ended up being Brandon Shuff. It ended up being a set for like $11,000... I got 5th in the pro tournament... Ronnie Wiseman won it that year. There was action every night. I heard they used to have 4 a year, then went to two a year, then one... Then it went to the bar table championships I think that's in Vegas now.

DrCue'sProtege
08-13-2017, 07:04 PM
Yeah, what I am talking about is the Pro 9-Ball tournament played on the 9-footers.

Did that actually run through 2008???

r/DCP

AtLarge
08-13-2017, 09:26 PM
Some of the Reno Open event winners:

June 2000 -- R. Martinez, $10,000
Dec. 2000 -- J. Horsfall, $10,000
June 2001 -- C. Deuel, $12,000
Dec. 2001 -- R. Morris, $12,000
June 2002 -- K. Davenport, $12,000
Dec. 2002 -- D. Medina, $12,000
June 2003 -- J. Schmidt, $12,000
Dec. 2003 -- M. Davis, $12,000
June 2004 -- R. Morris, $12,000
Dec. 2004 -- D. Basavich, $12,000
June 2005 -- M. Manalo, $12,000
Dec. 2005 -- R. Wiseman, $12,500
June 2006 -- D. Orcollo, $12,500
Dec. 2006 -- R. Orem, $12,500
Dec. 2007 -- S. Van Boening, $15,000
Dec. 2008 -- M. Davis, $15,000

jay helfert
08-14-2017, 04:10 AM
Sorry guys, my memory fails me sometimes on dates and events. I'm much better at remembering specific incidents that stand out in my mind. I was the TD in the late 80's and early 90's for maybe six or seven years. Back then there were two tourneys a year at the Sands (June and December) with a $300 entry fee into the pro event and a $10,000 top prize (good money back then). Barbara Woodward was the Sands host and organizer and at the end of the tourney we would count out $10,000 in hundreds on the final table and hand it all to the winner. Second place got $6,000.

There was also a Pro-Am event staged by Gene Stary right before the main event that used his excellent handicapping system for all the players. That was a cheap entry fee (like $50 or $60) and first prize was generally around $3,000. Many of the pros came early for that one as well. The whole event lasted for eleven days and I got paid $100 a day (plus room and food). It was a tough gig but I needed the dough. I was basically jobless except for the tournaments I worked, maybe ten or twelve a year. Hell, I was doing handy man work at a nearby health spa for women for $15 an hour just to make ends meet. OMG, I could tell you stories about that gig, doing repairs in the locker room! ;)

In the early 90's I made a deal with the BCA to stage the North American 9-Ball Championships in Reno and it was a big success. First place was $15,000! The BCA pulled out after two years and I made a new deal with the Sands and we renamed it the U.S. Bar Table Championships. I held it there for six or seven years, then moved to the Flamingo Hilton for a few years and next held it at the MGM by the airport. Before I sold the event to Mark Griffin we had moved back to the Sands. I think I ran the first twelve years of the USBT before Mark took over. I could write another book about just that one event, so many crazy things happened along the way.

By the way, in all the events I ever produced (a few dozen at last count) ALL the money got paid promptly and completely! I never owed any player a dime. In the second Los Angeles Open in 1994 when Mark Tadd won $26,000 I had a shortfall of over twenty grand to make up. I had about 50K to my name and I went to the bank and withdrew the money so that everyone got paid. The following year I produced the California Pool Tour for Brunswick (a series of ten events) just to get back on my feet. I got together with George Hardie of the Bicycle Club at around the same time (early 90's) to produce those events and they turned out to be huge successes, until Don Mackey came along and spoiled that party. It's been an adventure trying to make a living off Pool, but somehow I survived and eventually thrived. The few dollars I made over the years (poolrooms brought in the bulk of it) I poured into real estate deals and now it's multiplied tenfold and more!

I almost forgot all the great events we had at Hard Times in the late 80's to mid 90's. This was a collaboration with Chuck Markulis who wanted to create events that would bring the top players to L.A. He asked me how to do it and I told him we needed to add $10,000 to the purse. He never batted an eye and said let's do it and the rest is history.

Black-Balled
08-14-2017, 05:28 AM
Some great little tales here, nice.

garczar
08-14-2017, 05:45 AM
Sorry guys, my memory fails me sometimes on dates and events. I'm much better at remembering specific incidents that stand out in my mind. I was the TD in the late 80's and early 90's for maybe six or seven years. Back then there were two tourneys a year at the Sands (June and December) with a $300 entry fee into the pro event and a $10,000 top prize (good money back then). Barbara Woodward was the Sands host and organizer and at the end of the tourney we would count out $10,000 in hundreds on the final table and hand it all to the winner. Second place got $6,000.

There was also a Pro-Am event staged by Gene Stary right before the main event that used his excellent handicapping system for all the players. That was a cheap entry fee (like $50 or $60) and first prize was generally around $3,000. Many of the pros came early for that one as well. The whole event lasted for eleven days and I got paid $100 a day (plus room and food). It was a tough gig but I needed the dough. I was basically jobless except for the tournaments I worked, maybe ten or twelve a year. Hell, I was doing handy man work at a nearby health spa for women for $15 an hour just to make ends meet. OMG, I could tell you stories about that gig, doing repairs in the locker room! ;)

In the early 90's I made a deal with the BCA to stage the North American 9-Ball Championships in Reno and it was a big success. First place was $15,000! The BCA pulled out after two years and I made a new deal with the Sands and we renamed it the U.S. Bar Table Championships. I held it there for six or seven years, then moved to the Flamingo Hilton for a few years and next held it at the MGM by the airport. Before I sold the event to Mark Griffin we had moved back to the Sands. I think I ran the first twelve years of the USBT before Mark took over. I could write another book about just that one event, so many crazy things happened along the way.

By the way, in all the events I ever produced (a few dozen at last count) ALL the money got paid promptly and completely! I never owed any player a dime. In the second Los Angeles Open in 1994 when Mark Tadd won $26,000 I had a shortfall of over twenty grand to make up. I had about 50K to my name and I went to the bank and withdrew the money so that everyone got paid. The following year I produced the California Pool Tour for Brunswick (a series of ten events) just to get back on my feet. I got together with George Hardie of the Bicycle Club at around the same time (early 90's) to produce those events and they turned out to be huge successes, until Don Mackey came along and spoiled that party. It's been an adventure trying to make a living off Pool, but somehow I survived and eventually thrived. The few dollars I made over the years (poolrooms brought in the bulk of it) I poured into real estate deals and now it's multiplied tenfold and more!

I almost forgot all the great events we had at Hard Times in the late 80's to mid 90's. This was a collaboration with Chuck Markulis who wanted to create events that would bring the top players to L.A. He asked me how to do it and I told him we needed to add $10,000 to the purse. He never batted an eye and said let's do it and the rest is history.Wow. Talk about "been there,done that, got the t-shirt". Great post.

hang-the-9
08-14-2017, 06:04 AM
Nice info on that event, I thought it died out way before the 2000s. I have quite a few AccuStats matches from that event, some great classic pool matches happened during it.

wahcheck
08-14-2017, 06:30 AM
Those were the real good old days of pool for me. I think the first pro tournament I ever saw in person was one of those Sands Reno events. It was there I first saw Earl for the first time. It was also the first time I saw Bucktooth and how he tried to hustle the Pro players. I was impressed. I was hooked on the experience and attended every following one I could, summer and winter.
The winter events were adventuresome, when it was snowing. I think that's where Pat Fleming first started videotaping Accu-Stats matches, hauling all that equipment across the U.S. from the East. I also remember attending the 9-Ball tournament at Caesar's Lake Tahoe, where Earl beat Steve Mizerak in the Finals for $25,000 and a car! That was the first time I ever saw Earl (or anybody) do a jump shot (with his playing cue; "jump cues" didn't exist then) to win a game. The Sands Reno 9-ball Pro and Pro-Am tournaments and the Camel Pro Tour back then were the best of times for me as a pool fan. I sure miss them.

Bob Jewett
08-16-2017, 02:00 PM
Here is a Sands article I ran into while sorting through my P&B magazines.

June of 1999 was the 29th. Most years they had two tournaments.

467519

AtLarge
08-16-2017, 02:20 PM
Here is a Sands article I ran into while sorting through my P&B magazines.

June of 1999 was the 29th. Most years they had two tournaments. ...

The article mentions the 30th one would be in Dec., 1999. And then they held the 16 events I listed in post #8. So it looks like they had 46 events in total.

DrCue'sProtege
08-17-2017, 10:02 AM
If the Sands Reno Open ran all the way through 2008 did the Accu-Stats people video a lot of the matches? I don't see any Reno 9-Ball matches in their catalog. And if they quit filming around 2000, what happened?

Poolplaya9
08-17-2017, 11:15 AM
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