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DJSTEVEZ
08-14-2017, 07:38 PM
So I've been getting in, give or take a few minutes, at least an hour on the table everyday.

I'm beginning to see progress and consistency. My "self-awareness" of my mechanics is better.

The things I want to do are more consistent as are the things I want to refrain from doing.

I've always wanted to be good at this game and I think the table in the office, where access is so easy, is key.

By the time Fall is in full swing I'd just like to play in a tournament 2 or 3 times a month and be happy with my game...how I played

Right now I'm just hitting balls (trying to string a pattern together straight Pool style).

In the next couple of weeks I'm going to start drills and develop a regimen.

Stay tuned

https://i.pinimg.com/736x/e0/d6/7d/e0d67d505f7b5108978faa0d18975323--chic-nails-place.jpg

garczar
08-15-2017, 05:56 AM
So I've been getting in, give or take a few minutes, at least an hour on the table everyday.

I'm beginning to see progress and consistency. My "self-awareness" of my mechanics is better.

The things I want to do are more consistent as are the things I want to refrain from doing.

I've always wanted to be good at this game and I think the table in the office, where access is so easy, is key.

By the time Fall is in full swing I'd just like to play in a tournament 2 or 3 times a month and be happy with my game...how I played

Right now I'm just hitting balls (trying to string a pattern together straight Pool style).

In the next couple of weeks I'm going to start drills and develop a regiment.

Stay tuned

https://i.pinimg.com/736x/e0/d6/7d/e0d67d505f7b5108978faa0d18975323--chic-nails-place.jpgSorry to be picky here BUT: you develop a "regimen" not regiment. UNLESS, you're starting your own army. ;)

DaveInSC
08-15-2017, 05:59 AM
So I've been getting in, give or take a few minutes, at least an hour on the table everyday.

I'm beginning to see progress and consistency. My "self-awareness" of my mechanics is better.

The things I want to do are more consistent as are the things I want to refrain from doing.

I've always wanted to be good at this game and I think the table in the office, where access is so easy, is key.

By the time Fall is in full swing I'd just like to play in a tournament 2 or 3 times a month and be happy with my game...how I played

Right now I'm just hitting balls (trying to string a pattern together straight Pool style).

In the next couple of weeks I'm going to start drills and develop a regiment.

Stay tuned

https://i.pinimg.com/736x/e0/d6/7d/e0d67d505f7b5108978faa0d18975323--chic-nails-place.jpg

I'm working on getting consistent with practice too. You have a table at home, and at work? I'm seriously jealous... I have to go to the pool hall! Wife and I are looking to get a new house in a year or so... I WILL have a home table then :)

bbb
08-15-2017, 07:23 AM
enjoy the journey...:)

strmanglr scott
08-15-2017, 07:40 AM
I'm an 8, 9 ball player. The only time I'm happy w my game is if I run the rack or succeed in a safety war and run out.

Doesn't mean I don't enjoy the game when I don't.

DJSTEVEZ
08-15-2017, 08:47 AM
Sorry to be picky here BUT: you develop a "regimen" not regiment. UNLESS, you're starting your own army. ;) My mother was a professional proofreader and I was taught by Nuns in grades 1 to 12. I appreciate you bringing that to my attention more than you know. Thank you! -Z-

pt109
08-15-2017, 09:33 AM
Don't get too hung up on what's wrong, DJ...keep looking for something good.

467428

chefjeff
08-15-2017, 09:50 AM
My mother was a professional proofreader and I was taught by Nuns in grades 1 to 12. I appreciate you bringing that to my attention more than you know. Thank you! -Z-

Shouldn't that "you" be a "your"? :cool:


Jeff Livingston

pt109
08-15-2017, 10:05 AM
Shouldn't that "you" be a "your"? :cool:


Jeff Livingston

Pay heed to the Chef, he's a product of higher education....
...he read War and Peace once.....he suspects it's about Russia.


p....why are all the grads in Russia?.....t

book collector
08-15-2017, 10:16 AM
The same thing 95% of players who ever get better than a C level notice.
Now the only thing that will keep you from being a B, or A ,or semi pro, or pro, or superpro, is the ability and determination that no matter what else is going on in your life pool is number 1, and it gets the lions share and then some of your effort.
best of luck to you whatever happens.

hang-the-9
08-15-2017, 11:00 AM
I'm beginning to see progress and consistency. My "self-awareness" of my mechanics is better.


I like that description of what is happening, you know what you are doing and why and can adjust it if needed to see what happens. If it's all random like with many new players, you have no idea where the issue is or what to fix.

Something I like to also call "pool vision" is important, that is when you start to see the table as a collection of shots and tangent lines vs just a random mess of pool balls.

I had a similar breakthrough happen with music when I started to play an instrument. Before, a song to me was a whole thing, when I started to play guitar, I could pick apart the instruments and individual melody of them along with vocals on top, so I can basically "zoom" into a part of the song I wanted to listen to at will and then "zoom" out to listen to the whole song.

hang-the-9
08-15-2017, 11:02 AM
Don't get too hung up on what's wrong, DJ...keep looking for something good.

467428

Wow, that guy really hates water ballons.

Pushout
08-15-2017, 12:16 PM
Take it one day at a time, seriously.

KenRobbins
08-15-2017, 01:59 PM
The same thing 95% of players who ever get better than a C level notice.
Now the only thing that will keep you from being a B, or A ,or semi pro, or pro, or superpro, is the ability and determination that no matter what else is going on in your life pool is number 1, and it gets the lions share and then some of your effort.
best of luck to you whatever happens.

This is the difference, I agree. Just don't make any dramatic life changes for pool, unless you already have nothing, there's no reward for it. Most likely you'll never cash in on the spots that will make it worth while in the bigger tournaments. Nothing wrong with trying to perfect your game and be great at it. Just don't quit your day job. Stupid enough, that's what I did. I hated my job anyhow. Almost bought the motor home, luckily I didn't go all out stupid. A couple family members including my wife (probably trying to get rid of me lol) were actually pushing me to do it, but I'll never be good enough to make it to the top. I'm going to stop fooling myself, finish remodeling my home and stay in banger status. And retire as a grumpy old man.

DJSTEVEZ
08-15-2017, 05:53 PM
This is the difference, I agree. Just don't make any dramatic life changes for pool, unless you already have nothing, there's no reward for it. Most likely you'll never cash in on the spots that will make it worth while in the bigger tournaments. Nothing wrong with trying to perfect your game and be great at it. Just don't quit your day job. Stupid enough, that's what I did. I hated my job anyhow. Almost bought the motor home, luckily I didn't go all out stupid. A couple family members including my wife (probably trying to get rid of me lol) were actually pushing me to do it, but I'll never be good enough to make it to the top. I'm going to stop fooling myself, finish remodeling my home and stay in banger status. And retire as a grumpy old man.

Sage advice. I have no delusions about how far I'll go with my game. For me the journey is the reward. I love playing this game, but it's about the game within me more than it is anything else.
Pool could never be the most important thing in life to me, not even close...and that's OK. Not passing judgement on anyone for whom Pool is #1.
I just want to do as well as I can given what I am willing to put into it. For the 1st time I have some resources to put into cultivating my game.
Regardless of the results I know I'll have fun doing it. That's a pretty solid ROI from where I'm standing. Again, great advice. Thank you. -Z-

hotelyorba
08-16-2017, 01:51 AM
Interesting thread, I am on a similar journey myself. Just trying to get the most out of this game within my potential, and I also look at it from a 'journey is better than the end goal' perspective. I don't even know what I would define the end goal to be, although I am convinced I'd never reach any national or international champion level ever. And I'm fully okay with that -- as long as I keep feeling that there is more to learn I am totally happy playing this game the way I do.

I find that the more you 'study' your game and your stroke, the more details you see that also need work. It's like an endless zoom into the details, that shows more details, so you zoom in some more... to find more details. It's a beautiful thing. Don't know if that makes any sense at all, but it is how I experience it. :thumbup:

BC21
08-16-2017, 06:42 AM
Interesting thread, I am on a similar journey myself. Just trying to get the most out of this game within my potential, and I also look at it from a 'journey is better than the end goal' perspective. I don't even know what I would define the end goal to be, although I am convinced I'd never reach any national or international champion level ever. And I'm fully okay with that -- as long as I keep feeling that there is more to learn I am totally happy playing this game the way I do.

I find that the more you 'study' your game and your stroke, the more details you see that also need work. It's like an endless zoom into the details, that shows more details, so you zoom in some more... to find more details. It's a beautiful thing. Don't know if that makes any sense at all, but it is how I experience it. :thumbup:

This is a great way to look at it. I think too many players have an unrealistic goal of becoming the next big star in professional pool. It's like climbing Mt Everest...only a select few reach the top, but just climbing as far as you can, and as best as you can, is rewarding in itself.

There are hundreds of unknown professional-caliber players right now that find themselves struggling uphill to become the next greatest player. Only a handful will succeed.

This isn't meant to be discouraging. I'm just saying we can't all be champions, but we can certainly become very good players, great players, just maybe not the greatest. And that's a "maybe" because anything is possible. So zoom in, and keep zooming in until all flaws are highlighted and remedied. And above all, enjoy the process.

KenRobbins
08-16-2017, 04:58 PM
Sage advice. I have no delusions about how far I'll go with my game. For me the journey is the reward. I love playing this game, but it's about the game within me more than it is anything else.
Pool could never be the most important thing in life to me, not even close...and that's OK. Not passing judgement on anyone for whom Pool is #1.
I just want to do as well as I can given what I am willing to put into it. For the 1st time I have some resources to put into cultivating my game.
Regardless of the results I know I'll have fun doing it. That's a pretty solid ROI from where I'm standing. Again, great advice. Thank you. -Z-

I'm not sure how many constructive hours a week they say you should put into table time. I've been playing again for just a little over a year now after about a 10 year break. For about 6 months I was putting around 70 hours of table time in a week, I'm down around 40 hours a week now. It's a weird feeling but a good feeling that you'll notice when everything just clicks when you really improve. A lot of times when you look at the table the pockets will look much bigger than they really are. It's really hard to explain and probably makes no sense at all. I won't be hanging my cue up again. I've been keeping track of the money board here on azbilliards on a couple pro's. It's really not that good. Not sure where I'm going from here. Maybe join a barbox pool league. LMAO

DJSTEVEZ
08-16-2017, 05:18 PM
Interesting thread, I am on a similar journey myself. Just trying to get the most out of this game within my potential, and I also look at it from a 'journey is better than the end goal' perspective. I don't even know what I would define the end goal to be, although I am convinced I'd never reach any national or international champion level ever. And I'm fully okay with that -- as long as I keep feeling that there is more to learn I am totally happy playing this game the way I do.

I find that the more you 'study' your game and your stroke, the more details you see that also need work. It's like an endless zoom into the details, that shows more details, so you zoom in some more... to find more details. It's a beautiful thing. Don't know if that makes any sense at all, but it is how I experience it. :thumbup:

I think this what the book "Zen and The Art Of Motorcycle Maintenance" spoke to.
For me, If I could run 2 racks (14.1), once, that'd be damn satisfying. I don' think it's an unrealistic goal. I've got no real interest in gambling or trophies...not knocking those things for anyone else, it's not a judgement. For me, it's always just been about the game itself.

pt109
08-16-2017, 05:51 PM
I think this what the book "Zen and The Art Of Motorcycle Maintenance" spoke to.
For me, If I could run 2 racks (14.1), once, that'd be damn satisfying. I don' think it's an unrealistic goal. I've got no real interest in gambling or trophies...not knocking those things for anyone else, it's not a judgement. For me, it's always just been about the game itself.

'This sport in all its absurdity did a special thing for Ben Meecham: it made him happy.
The court was a testing ground of purpose.There was a reason.There were goals, rewards,
and instant punishments for failure.It was life reduced to a set of rules, an existential life,
a life clarified by the eyes of fathers."

Pat Conroy....The Great Santini

I doubt if any great player started out by envisioning being a great player....
...let the game take you to where it may.....be happy playing.

DJSTEVEZ
08-16-2017, 06:12 PM
This is a great way to look at it. I think too many players have an unrealistic goal of becoming the next big star in professional pool. It's like climbing Mt Everest...only a select few reach the top, but just climbing as far as you can, and as best as you can, is rewarding in itself.

There are hundreds of unknown professional-caliber players right now that find themselves struggling uphill to become the next greatest player. Only a handful will succeed.

This isn't meant to be discouraging. I'm just saying we can't all be champions, but we can certainly become very good players, great players, just maybe not the greatest. And that's a "maybe" because anything is possible. So zoom in, and keep zooming in until all flaws are highlighted and remedied. And above all, enjoy the process.

Thanks for the reply. I couldn't agree more. Not everyone who can sing or play an instrument will get to be a rock star. We all would like to be Robert Plant or Jimmy Page, but the math simply doesn't work.
I was a nightclub & private party DJ for 30 years (started in 1984 before I was even old enough to be a patron in the clubs I was DJing in).
I didn't end up remixing Madonna, I didn't end up a Marquee name, selling out huge venues (that all actually didn't come about until after I was out of the nightclub scene) but I had a helluva great time.
I wouldn't trade those days for anything, it's how I paid my way through school and how I bought my home.
Getting paid to do what you love (without the risk of gambling). My point is, even for those who don't get to be "the Rock Star" , they can still have the time of their life if they use a little common sense and have a little perspective. Not a bad deal. So what's the bad news, I won't get to be Mike SIgel? That's more than fair because I haven't come anywhere even remotely close to putting into the game what he has and I've nowhere near the talent that he does. I'm cool with that, I even take comfort in that. It sort of reassures me about there being a natural order of things. -Z-

book collector
08-16-2017, 07:11 PM
I'm not sure how many constructive hours a week they say you should put into table time. I've been playing again for just a little over a year now after about a 10 year break. For about 6 months I was putting around 70 hours of table time in a week, I'm down around 40 hours a week now. It's a weird feeling but a good feeling that you'll notice when everything just clicks when you really improve. A lot of times when you look at the table the pockets will look much bigger than they really are. It's really hard to explain and probably makes no sense at all. I won't be hanging my cue up again. I've been keeping track of the money board here on azbilliards on a couple pro's. It's really not that good. Not sure where I'm going from here. Maybe join a barbox pool league. LMAO

70 or more is what it takes to improve in big strides , 40 is a more realistic approach unless you don't have a family or other interests, although realistically, at 40 hours a week , it's a full time job, that you have to pay to keep.
For almost everyone , 40 hours at minimum wage, would beat what they average making gambling, and one day, you will have at least some kind of retirement benefits, and insurance.
Most of the pool players I know , get a couple hundred a month to live on.

BC21
08-16-2017, 09:15 PM
Thanks for the reply. I couldn't agree more. Not everyone who can sing or play an instrument will get to be a rock star. We all would like to be Robert Plant or Jimmy Page, but the math simply doesn't work.
I was a nightclub & private party DJ for 30 years (started in 1984 before I was even old enough to be a patron in the clubs I was DJing in).
I didn't end up remixing Madonna, I didn't end up a Marquee name, selling out huge venues (that all actually didn't come about until after I was out of the nightclub scene) but I had a helluva great time.
I wouldn't trade those days for anything, it's how I paid my way through school and how I bought my home.
Getting paid to do what you love (without the risk of gambling). My point is, even for those who don't get to be "the Rock Star" , they can still have the time of their life if they use a little common sense and have a little perspective. Not a bad deal. So what's the bad news, I won't get to be Mike SIgel? That's more than fair because I haven't come anywhere even remotely close to putting into the game what he has and I've nowhere near the talent that he does. I'm cool with that, I even take comfort in that. It sort of reassures me about there being a natural order of things. -Z-

Good words. I've been in the music business (small time) since I was about 19 or 20, playing guitar and writing songs. Back then I had dreams of becoming a rock star. And though I had very promising moments where I really thought those dreams would come to fruition, it just never panned out. I'm still playing lead guitar and play out about once a month. Friends come and watch and listen, then tell me I should do something with my music because I'm "wasting" my talent. I tell them I am doing something, they just watched it. Lol.

At my age, 49, I don't dream of hearing my songs on the radio anymore. But that doesn't mean I can't enjoy writing and playing. Pool is the same way. I don't play in bars much because most bar players like to get a shot, and they can turn redneck really quick if all they get to do is watch. So I go to the pool hall where it's appreciated and respected. A couple of guys I play even, several I have to fork out weight, and occasionally a very strong player will come through and I get a little weight. I'm not a pro, but for the effort I put into the game, I maintain a better than average skill level, and my passion for pool hasn't wavered in 30 years. It's right up there with music. I do it for me.

hotelyorba
08-16-2017, 11:34 PM
I think this what the book "Zen and The Art Of Motorcycle Maintenance" spoke to.
For me, If I could run 2 racks (14.1), once, that'd be damn satisfying. I don' think it's an unrealistic goal. I've got no real interest in gambling or trophies...not knocking those things for anyone else, it's not a judgement. For me, it's always just been about the game itself.
That's a book that is still on my 'need to read'-list.

Those 2 racks of 14.1 - is that really a goal that you set for yourself? I find it is better to study the game of 14.1, see what each rack is broken up into (break shot - pack 'handling' - end pattern - leaving a break shot - repeat) and trying to master each of those aspects. Once I got better at each of those aspects, the racks started to weave together and before you know it you are way beyond just those 2 racks! I never count the racks I run when I'm in 'training', it has happened more than once that I said to myself "wow I think I was in the fourth rack there, not even sure!"

To view from another perspective: I see guys in my league trying to smack that pack open and bang balls in and watch them get frustrated they don't get any further, just because they are not looking at the mechanics of the game. They just expect to run rack after rack because they did that a long time ago when they had a lucky streak. Now I'm not saying you are like that, there's no way for me to know - I'm just trying to point out the significance of details.

Another thing I'd like to point out: being able to experience the game as a learning journey, like people in this thread (me included) are talking about, is not for everyone. Lots of players hate to do drills, don't like playing by themselves, get bored easily and/or are just not that 'learnable'.
So count yourself lucky if you enjoy the game in this manner! I know I do! :smile:

KenRobbins
08-17-2017, 12:43 AM
70 or more is what it takes to improve in big strides , 40 is a more realistic approach unless you don't have a family or other interests, although realistically, at 40 hours a week , it's a full time job, that you have to pay to keep.
For almost everyone , 40 hours at minimum wage, would beat what they average making gambling, and one day, you will have at least some kind of retirement benefits, and insurance.
Most of the pool players I know , get a couple hundred a month to live on.

I declined health coverage at my previous job for many years. My wife has very good health insurance. Financially right now I'm ok. I even put a lot of thought on taking up Justin Bergmens challenge and willing to get my teeth knocked out. That would be to big of a jump on where I'm currently at. Pool is the biggest thing on my bucket list and better do it while I can still swing the cue. Problem is there won't be no return for the money spent on the road. Hustling is out of the question, even though I considered doing it again. I'm definitely not going back down that road. I'm going to just enjoy the game and stop thinking about it.

DJSTEVEZ
08-17-2017, 05:36 AM
That's a book that is still on my 'need to read'-list.

Those 2 racks of 14.1 - is that really a goal that you set for yourself? I find it is better to study the game of 14.1, see what each rack is broken up into (break shot - pack 'handling' - end pattern - leaving a break shot - repeat) and trying to master each of those aspects. Once I got better at each of those aspects, the racks started to weave together and before you know it you are way beyond just those 2 racks! I never count the racks I run when I'm in 'training', it has happened more than once that I said to myself "wow I think I was in the fourth rack there, not even sure!"

We're exactly on the same page. I'm one of those people with ZERO natural pool playing ability. I'm a horrible athlete My hand eye coordination would qualify me for a seeing eye dog, lol. Where I do excel is in what I'd call the "academic" part of the game. Early on in my love of the game I made it a point to seek instruction from very qualified instructors and I played almost exclusively with "older" gentlemen who played way better than me. I was always happy to "just watch" if need be in order to learn something from what the old-timers knew. I also immersed myself in books and videos. So yes, studying the game has always been first. 2 racks of 14.1 is a measureable fruition I'd like my efforts to reach. It's a good motivator. I also do pretty well in teaching the game. I've given lessons to newbies and they've consistently had positive things to say a week or so after the lesson when they've been able to practice what I taught.

I just love this game. -Z-

tashworth19191
08-17-2017, 10:57 PM
I think blackjack offers the best advice on the subject of life balance and playing pool. Not only a storied career in pool with great stories, he is a great guy as well. Check out his site -> https://www.thezone-spc.com/

ceebee
08-18-2017, 07:12 AM
As Vince Lombardi once said... “Practice makes perfect” – namely, “Practice does not make perfect. Only perfect practice makes perfect.”

Maybe an outline for your practice would be good. Maybe some videos of you, as you go along, would be helpful, especially if you have a mentor.

Reading books & watching videos will help you gain knowledge, Knowledge is power, especially when you can apply that knowledge. Practice is for learning to apply that new found knowledge. IF & when you hit a bump in the road, maybe your mentor can step in & give you a boost...

Pool isn't the kind of sport that's easy to learn on your own. The ROTE system is about 20 years long, with no guarantee of success. Dr Dave's or Tor Lowry's videos will shorten that trip... immensely, IF YOU POSSESS the talent......

The reason for a mentor, tutor, instructor or coach is the prevention of bad habits from creeping in at the start.

Obviously there's more.... Good Luck

dr_dave
08-27-2017, 04:01 PM
Pool isn't the kind of sport that's easy to learn on your own. The ROTE system is about 20 years long, with no guarantee of success. Dr Dave's or Tor Lowry's videos will shorten that trip... immensely, IF YOU POSSESS the talent......

The reason for a mentor, tutor, instructor or coach is the prevention of bad habits from creeping in at the start.People who find the topics in this thread interesting might also enjoy the following resource pages:

improving your game (http://billiards.colostate.edu/threads/advice.html#general)

knowledge can be useful, but you still need skill (http://billiards.colostate.edu/threads/mental.html#knowledge)

what it takes to play like a pro (and "nature" vs. "nurture") (http://billiards.colostate.edu/threads/advice.html#pro)

Enjoy,
Dave