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str8eight
10-05-2017, 08:10 PM
What do you think of when looking over the table? Specifically moving the cb for your run. Do you look at pocket lines and which side to be on for the next shot? Or is there a better way?


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longhorns2
10-05-2017, 08:22 PM
I look at the shot and figure out where I want the cue ball to end up, then figure out where I need to hit the cue ball to do that and how hard. Use whatever aim system/feel you want to pocket the ball, but when I'm down on the shot I'm only picturing the ob going in and "feeling" the distance for the leave.

A lot of it is feel and muscle memory. It's like CJ used to post that on shots similar to the spot, instead of concentrating on your aim point you'll have more success "feeling" the connection between where you're aiming and the pocket

Ralph Kramden
10-05-2017, 08:34 PM
What do you think of when looking over the table? Specifically moving the cb for your run. Do you look at pocket lines and which side to be on for the next shot? Or is there a better way?


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I always look at the tangent (stun) line to find the best CB path for the next ball.
I'll find the correct side of my next OB by looking down the shot line for that OB.
If I know the next shot line I know the correct side to be on for the following OB.
I usually don't think about pocketing the OB, but the speed of the CB for shape.

.

Blackjack
10-05-2017, 10:56 PM
In the video link below,I discuss how the brain works like a computer - and how to employ a mental preshot routine.


Your Brain Is A Lousy Pool Player (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0I33zvWA-jE&t=319s)

DS

rbpwrd240
10-05-2017, 11:16 PM
Pre shot routine and reading the table are two totally different subjects.

For a pre-shot routine I chalk get down in line on the cue ball where I plan to hit it. I stroke three times at that spot then pick up my head and focus on the object ball and stroke through the ball.

As for reading the table I find my problem or "control balls" then I workout a plan to get to these balls during the run. If this cant be done I will figure out a safe. If the run is possible I like to brake the table into two halves and work one side at a time again if possible.

336Robin
10-06-2017, 07:53 AM
What do you think of when looking over the table? Specifically moving the cb for your run. Do you look at pocket lines and which side to be on for the next shot? Or is there a better way?


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Preshot is the most important part of my position play game. Other than shot making its probably the most important part of the game. If you cant plan well and know how to execute the parts of the plan, you probably don't have much. I talk to myself, plan at least 3 balls ahead and even tell myself how to address the object ball with the cue ball that way when I get down I'm sure I've made all of the decisions and nothing left but to execute. No hitting and hoping.

Scott Lee
10-06-2017, 09:34 AM
That's not true at all. Actually we have 3 preshot routines...the first one is the 'mental" routine, where decision-making occurs. The second is what happens after we're done decision-making, but our bridge hand has not yet hit the table. What YOU call the "preshot routine" is the third routine...the shooting routine, which begins with the bridge hand going down on the cloth. All three routines, working together, create the best chance for success at the table.

Scott Lee
http://poolknowledge.com

Pre shot routine and reading the table are two totally different subjects.

CCCue
10-06-2017, 10:51 AM
In the video link below,I discuss how the brain works like a computer - and how to employ a mental preshot routine.


Your Brain Is A Lousy Pool Player (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0I33zvWA-jE&t=319s)

DS

Great video.

Protocol
10-06-2017, 12:54 PM
Recommended!

In the video link below,I discuss how the brain works like a computer - and how to employ a mental preshot routine.


Your Brain Is A Lousy Pool Player (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0I33zvWA-jE&t=319s)

DS

gesan
10-06-2017, 02:22 PM
In the video link below,I discuss how the brain works like a computer - and how to employ a mental preshot routine.


Your Brain Is A Lousy Pool Player (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0I33zvWA-jE&t=319s)

DS
Thanks for the link and the info. The video is a good one!

336Robin
10-06-2017, 02:36 PM
In the video link below,I discuss how the brain works like a computer - and how to employ a mental preshot routine.


Your Brain Is A Lousy Pool Player (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0I33zvWA-jE&t=319s)

DS

I understand what this guy is trying to say but I think there is an easier approach. When you understand you shot making technique and have a concept in your mind about what stroke speed is then you can manage to add any spin you need.

Those simple parts, when you know them and can look at a shot and say to yourself how to plan them will put you in a zone where your stroke/touch for speed control is precise and getting to the next ball is so much easier.

I am wary of anyone that does not know how they do what they do and tells me you have to channel your inner pool player when I know exactly how I channel my inner pool player and can tell you because I understand how I do it from aiming , speed control banking etc. Its because I understand those pieces that I then trust the visual feel that Ive developed with each pieces which is the zone and has lots of room to feel, tweak and perfect. Just my opinion but this works for me and I understand how and why. Most of those folks can't tell you how.

Mkindsv
10-06-2017, 04:17 PM
I usually do not even think of taking a shot until I have at least my first four shots figured out. As for a PSR, I don't have one that I consciously do, though I am sure it is there since most shots kinda go the same way, unless something unusual is afoot. Tangent lines are a plus, being on the right side of them is a definite goal to have every shot, but you should see this before you ever get down on a shot, then if you get out of line, make a new plan.

rbpwrd240
10-06-2017, 04:39 PM
I think its important to note that the position play changes with the game. 9 ball and 10 ball are about the same and 8 ball can be very different. So what game are you talking about....

336Robin
10-07-2017, 06:59 AM
I think its important to note that the position play changes with the game. 9 ball and 10 ball are about the same and 8 ball can be very different. So what game are you talking about....

There are differences in the games yes I will agree but the principles that holds those game together are the same.

You must be able to pocket balls to win games. If you cannot no amount of shooting safe will save you from an offense that is stronger than yours hence practice in that area is prudent and collective in skill over time.

You must be able to shoot safe and really get safe to take away a person chances.

You must know where the cut off is between your ability to pocket and the need to go safe

You must also understand the premise of the games, i,e 8 ball is different than rotation and both are different from one pocket which is a game of many moves then shot making where as the other games are mostly shot making games with different pocketing strategies.

Pocket Ball, Go Safe is the game. When you decide to either is where you grow in each discipline.

lfigueroa
10-07-2017, 07:47 AM
I understand what this guy is trying to say but I think there is an easier approach. When you understand you shot making technique and have a concept in your mind about what stroke speed is then you can manage to add any spin you need.

Those simple parts, when you know them and can look at a shot and say to yourself how to plan them will put you in a zone where your stroke/touch for speed control is precise and getting to the next ball is so much easier.

I am wary of anyone that does not know how they do what they do and tells me you have to channel your inner pool player when I know exactly how I channel my inner pool player and can tell you because I understand how I do it from aiming , speed control banking etc. Its because I understand those pieces that I then trust the visual feel that Ive developed with each pieces which is the zone and has lots of room to feel, tweak and perfect. Just my opinion but this works for me and I understand how and why. Most of those folks can't tell you how.


There are a lot of different approaches to this game.

Certainly some guys are totally analytical and nuanced in their approach. IOWs very left brain. But other guys are very natural and intuitive and probably couldn't tell you how they do things, despite the fact that they do those things very well. It's not a failing, it's just that they are more right brain kind of guys.

Perhaps, we all start out utilizing the left side, carefully choosing our stance, bridge, head height, aiming point, stroke speed and so on. But is not the goal to do all that naturally, or unconsciously? I know a long time ago I would think about stroke speed for a particular shot. Nowadays I don't, I just do without thinking about it and couldn't tell you how I do that.

BTW, David Sapolis is a very accomplished player, writer, and instructor.

Lou Figueroa

book collector
10-07-2017, 03:03 PM
I try not to think of anything but, "Don't Dog IT!"
Some people over think things.

336Robin
10-07-2017, 05:59 PM
There are a lot of different approaches to this game.

Certainly some guys are totally analytical and nuanced in their approach. IOWs very left brain. But other guys are very natural and intuitive and probably couldn't tell you how they do things, despite the fact that they do those things very well. It's not a failing, it's just that they are more right brain kind of guys.

Perhaps, we all start out utilizing the left side, carefully choosing our stance, bridge, head height, aiming point, stroke speed and so on. But is not the goal to do all that naturally, or unconsciously? I know a long time ago I would think about stroke speed for a particular shot. Nowadays I don't, I just do without thinking about it and couldn't tell you how I do that.

BTW, David Sapolis is a very accomplished player, writer, and instructor.

Lou Figueroa

Yes I recognize that David Sapolis is a very accomplished player, writer and instructor.

I have spent a long time analyzing individual parts of the game because it was important to me to reassemble them in my own game. I do recognize those who intuitively play well such as yourself. I've several friends who do the same and I have a better understanding of me at the table than I've ever had and I'm playing the best One Pocket I've ever. Amazing to me is the small nuances of that game. It improves the overall game so much. One of the finest instructors I ever had the chance to play with had these Old School explanations that made a lot of sense yet no technicality was present. To me that is art. People who manage to understand it like that still amaze me. I was unable to get the full understanding of what I needed until after I picked a few things apart. Pool is so subjective. I really don't understand how anyone could say any part of its objective but I'll leave that one alone.

Ched
10-08-2017, 05:27 PM
I do analyze the table each new time I walk up to it - more often than not walking all the way around from about 2-3 feet from rail. Once I've come up with a rough idea of what I want to do:

1. Visualize ghost cue ball
1b. place cue at angle I want.
2. Stance
3. Bridge and grip
4. pick where I'm going to cue up.
5. stroke
6. focus on object ball .. and ...
7 shoot.

gesan
10-12-2017, 07:35 PM
In the video link below,I discuss how the brain works like a computer - and how to employ a mental preshot routine.


Your Brain Is A Lousy Pool Player (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0I33zvWA-jE&t=319s)

DS

I watched your video a few days ago. I decided to give it a shot tonite playing scotch doubles 9ball. Same group I lost all 3 sets with last week, I won all 3 this week. Not enough data to make a firm conclusion, but it was a hell of a lot more fun. I clearly played better too.

So thanks again and I'll be using that method for the near future.

Get_A_Grip
10-12-2017, 10:22 PM
In the video link below,I discuss how the brain works like a computer - and how to employ a mental preshot routine.





Your Brain Is A Lousy Pool Player (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0I33zvWA-jE&t=319s)



DS

That was great. I loved it. I agree, let your sub-conscious take over and focus, focus, focus.




_______

Neil
10-12-2017, 11:25 PM
That's not true at all. Actually we have 3 preshot routines...the first one is the 'mental" routine, where decision-making occurs. The second is what happens after we're done decision-making, but our bridge hand has not yet hit the table. What YOU call the "preshot routine" is the third routine...the shooting routine, which begins with the bridge hand going down on the cloth. All three routines, working together, create the best chance for success at the table.

Scott Lee
http://poolknowledge.com

I play best when I use four. The first one is- "I'm here to kick ass and take names, and right now, your (player, not you Scott) name is top on the list."

Without a strong desire to win, one is basically tossing dice.