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Brookeland Bill
10-12-2017, 10:36 AM
Iíve made an adjustment to my contact point on the object ball. Instead of the point 180 degrees on the line from the object ball to the target pocket (i.e. opposite the line to the target pocket),I use a point just a point just a ďhairĒfrom that point on my side of the object ball. I discovered this while practicing and having trouble pocketing balls consistently. I donít know if itís the spherical shape of the balls or the parallex view phenomenon or my aging eyesight or just a quirk. Iíve been playing for over 50 years.

BRussell
10-12-2017, 11:01 AM
So you aim to under cut a little?

Bob Jewett
10-12-2017, 11:01 AM
Iíve made an adjustment to my contact point on the object ball. Instead of the point 180 degrees on the line from the object ball to the target pocket (i.e. opposite the line to the target pocket),I use a point just a point just a ďhairĒfrom that point on my side of the object ball. I discovered this while practicing and having trouble pocketing balls consistently. I donít know if itís the spherical shape of the balls or the parallex view phenomenon or my aging eyesight or just a quirk. Iíve been playing for over 50 years.
For most shots the contact point needs to be slightly on the "far" side of the ball which would be too much cut if there were no friction between the balls. That's the reality.

The perception can be very different. You have to adjust your aiming method to whatever gets the ball into the pocket.

tucson9ball
10-12-2017, 12:40 PM
Iíve made an adjustment to my contact point on the object ball. Instead of the point 180 degrees on the line from the object ball to the target pocket (i.e. opposite the line to the target pocket),I use a point just a point just a ďhairĒfrom that point on my side of the object ball. I discovered this while practicing and having trouble pocketing balls consistently. I donít know if itís the spherical shape of the balls or the parallex view phenomenon or my aging eyesight or just a quirk. Iíve been playing for over 50 years.

I would think, because of friction between the cue ball and object ball it would be the opposite.
Aim to the far side or over-cut......but whatever works I suppose.

RickLafayette
10-12-2017, 02:20 PM
Too many other variables. Slower speed, more friction. Faster speed, less friction. And that's just center ball. What about inside English or outside English? Also, distance plays into the equation.

cardiac kid
10-12-2017, 06:39 PM
Here we go again. Would a Mod please move this thread to the Aiming Forum!!!!!! :eek: :thumbup:

Lyn

Imac007
01-03-2018, 01:32 AM
For most shots the contact point needs to be slightly on the "far" side of the ball which would be too much cut if there were no friction between the balls. That's the reality.

The perception can be very different. You have to adjust your aiming method to whatever gets the ball into the pocket.

Agree completely. My experience is that players think they are hitting the contact point but are actually hitting on the nearer side. Often it doesn’t matter. The way I teach parallel aiming is to first introduce the player to hitting an actual point. To do that I put a toothpick at 90 degrees to the cushion with the point at the edge of the rail. I then have the player try to contact the cue ball contact point with the end. If a true hit is made the toothpick is driven at the 90 degrees, off the cushion. This isn’t about an aiming system. It’s about making the cue ball an extension of the cue. It’s about controlling the interactions. Good players do just that. Hitting the ball where it needs to be hit to pocket it is the central point of every system, whether that is where their focus is or not. A system is just a language description of what they are doing to try to achieve that.

Physics has its place in that process. Dr. Dave tells us about throw, spin or cut induced. He also, teaches about gearing effects. Plus of course, the variables of speed and amount of intentionally applied spin.

My methods involve an adjustment depending upon fullness of hit. If possible on near half ball hits, especially between ⅓ and ⅔ contacts, I use a touch of outside side. This uses the gearing effect and throw to counter any cut induced throw. On very fine cuts I apply outside English to counter cut induced side.

On the extreme cuts, if outside spin creates bad angles off subsequent rail contacts, I will make adjustments to the contact point, aiming for the overcut pocket point. The rail side side imparted on the object ball creates a path curving towards the rail. If you have learned to contact a target point on the ball surface the shot is just about execution.

I also adjust most times when shooting a combination into a corner that requires a cut. Cut induced throw seems more pronounced when the balls start from a stationary state and travel very short distances before contacting the second ball. My success rate went way up once I immersed myself in the control of the cue ball plus the pot. The cue ball often needs a particular stroke. Cut induced throw is considered but so is spin transfer and subsequent throw actions down the chain reaction. Most of these combos are undercut, by even better players.

These cuts and some extreme cuts tend to be the sole times I consciously adjust my aim point. The other times where outside English is used to counter induced throw, I do not adjust the object ball contact point.

dearnold
01-03-2018, 05:11 AM
Jewett is right, as always. It's really whatever works for you. I'm surprised that people are always searching for some magic formula for where the contact point objectively exists out there on the object ball. The right contact point is determined by your brain's perception of the contact point and how it translates that to your stroke.

Want to zero in on it? Set up a cut shot and hit it 50 times. Track whether you are over or undercutting the ball consistently (it you are randomly missing the ball on either side of the pocket, then you either need some more work on fundamentals or maybe you take up chess). This will let you hone in on where the right contact point is FOR YOU. And where it is FOR YOU is all that matters because it's your brain that is moving your arm. How your cousin aims is irrelevant.

I've been over cutting balls for 30 years. I still do it today. Your brain is great at convincing you about something that clearly isn't true (like hit the ball here, even though you know you're gonna overcut that ball)!! Part of aiming is learning to override any errors your brain is introducing into your vision, aim and stroke.

LAMas
01-03-2018, 02:04 PM
It compensates for the CIT.