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lights_out
11-18-2006, 02:37 AM
Up until recently I have been playing almost exclusively with Predator cues and the Z shaft. I love my Z shafts! Can't be without one. All my cues and shafts have the Uni-Lock joint and are interchangable. No matter which combination of butt and shaft I played, they pretty much all felt the same. I also use Talisman WB hard tips on all my shafts.

Recently I purchased a custom cue with a SS piloted 5/16x14 joint and immediately ordered a Z shaft for it with the Talisman WB hard tip. I expected it to play and feel close to the same as my Predator cues, with the exception of weight and balance point, based on what I've read here in the past about the feel of the cue coming mostly from the joint, shaft, and tip. This cue feels nothing like my Predators. It has a much stiffer and crisper hit, I love it! A week later I came across a deal on a Schon LTD that I couldn't pass up. Schons have the same SS piloted 5/16x14 joint. Of course I ordered it with a Z shaft so I would have a spare in my case. This Schon hits harder and crisper than the custom using the same shaft. I now have my new playing cue.

My question is how is it that two different cues of roughly the same weight, balance point, and joint, using the same shafts, feel so different? I would think that this example disproves the notion that most of the feel you get from a cue comes from the shaft.

Gerry
11-18-2006, 04:22 AM
The joint plays as big a part in the feel of a cue as does the tip, taper, ferrule, etc. Some people will disagree with me on this, but I know it to be true IMO.

The other thing you will find is that cues from the same maker with the same build can hit very differently. With the different piece of wood, drying time, how many cuts and how close together, and even as little as a couple mil difference in thickness will change the cue dramatically.

I have come to the conclusion that the best cues, no matter the make or build, have a certain vibration frequency to their hit. I think when someone likes the "feel" a cue, they are referring to the way the impact of the tip to the cue ball travels to their hand via energy/vibration.

I think some very smart cue builder will someday design a piece of equipment to test the vibration of a cues hit, and market each cue with a designation of that vibration number. We could also see the difference when a tip is changed, and what that does to the feel, .......because FEEL is subjective, and very hard to explain to another person, or cue builder.

Maybe I'll build something today?!:D

Gerry

ridewiththewind
11-18-2006, 11:17 AM
Well, I am going to have to disagree that respective 'feel' of a cue's hit is attributable solely to the shaft, ferrule, and tip. Yes, it does play a part, but not the whole. For instance, I can definitely tell the difference in 'feel' between an ebony-nosed butt and a maple-nosed one. I also think that the balance point is a big factor as well. And yes, I truly believe that the pin and joint type play a big role here as well. There is simply too much dependent on so many factors within the cue's construction itself to leave it all to the shaft, ferrule, and tip.

I am not a big proponent of after-market shafts on custom cues either. I suppose, if you are having the cue built from scratch, to your specs, with the after-market shaft factored in it would be different, but, with that said...most of us buy not only because of the aestheitics of a certain cuemaker's cue, but because of that particular cuemaker's reputation for 'playability'. A lot of that has to do with a particular taper that that cuemaker uses in not only the butt, but the shaft as well. When you add an after-market shaft to such a cue that hasn't been built for one, it changes the way that cue 'plays'...not only could it be changing the basic taper of the cue overall, but it can change the balance point and weight of the cue as well.

Not to mention that it appears that a custom cue made with strictly after-market shafts doesn't fair as well on the secondary market. I guess my feeling is, if you are wanting to play with a 'stiff' cue, then seek out a cuemaker who makes 'stiff' cues...otherwise, buy a Predator cue and be done with it.

Please note, this is just my opinion...there are alot of people out there that love the laminated after-market shafts, and will 'poo poo' what I have just said...maybe I am just a 'purist' whan it comes to my equipment.:eek:

Lisa

tedkaufman
11-18-2006, 01:59 PM
Well, I am going to have to disagree that respective 'feel' of a cue's hit is attributable solely to the shaft, ferrule, and tip. Yes, it does play a part, but not the whole. For instance, I can definitely tell the difference in 'feel' between an ebony-nosed butt and a maple-nosed one. I also think that the balance point is a big factor as well. And yes, I truly believe that the pin and joint type play a big role here as well. There is simply too much dependent on so many factors within the cue's construction itself to leave it all to the shaft, ferrule, and tip.

I am not a big proponent of after-market shafts on custom cues either. I suppose, if you are having the cue built from scratch, to your specs, with the after-market shaft factored in it would be different, but, with that said...most of us buy not only because of the aestheitics of a certain cuemaker's cue, but because of that particular cuemaker's reputation for 'playability'. A lot of that has to do with a particular taper that that cuemaker uses in not only the butt, but the shaft as well. When you add an after-market shaft to such a cue that hasn't been built for one, it changes the way that cue 'plays'...not only could it be changing the basic taper of the cue overall, but it can change the balance point and weight of the cue as well.

Not to mention that it appears that a custom cue made with strictly after-market shafts doesn't fair as well on the secondary market. I guess my feeling is, if you are wanting to play with a 'stiff' cue, then seek out a cuemaker who makes 'stiff' cues...otherwise, buy a Predator cue and be done with it.

Please note, this is just my opinion...there are alot of people out there that love the laminated after-market shafts, and will 'poo poo' what I have just said...maybe I am just a 'purist' whan it comes to my equipment.:eek:

Lisa

Lisa, I basically agree with most of what you said, particularly your preference for a cuemaker's shafts and design over laminated after-markets. However, your "disagreement" was with something that hadn't been stated. Gerry said, "The joint plays as big a part in the feel of a cue as does the tip, taper, ferrule, etc." I would certainly agree on the joint's contribution to a cue's feel. But I agree with you that the type of wood is a factor as well, in addition to the shaft taper, ferrule, tip and so on. I have two SW cues. Both have wonderful resonance, but one (tulipwood) makes a mellow "pong" sound, and the other, made of cocobolo, makes a sharper "ping" sound, as if they were two different notes a few registers apart stuck on the same instrument. (The shafts are interchangeable, and the tonal difference is consistent with all the shafts.)

Another factor I'm becoming aware of is the contribution to the cue's resonance the A-bolt makes (the hidden joint that joins the handle to the nose). This seems to be a critical factor. What has opened my eyes to this is my displeasure with the hit of cues featuring a full length core, without an A-bolt. I find they feel dull, almost inert, compared to a properly constructed A-bolt design. I've only tried 5-6 cues of this type, but their hit was pretty consistent--super solid, but with no feel and a very quiet almost resonance-free hit. Logically, this design would seem better--stronger--but they don't feel right to me. I wonder if anyone else has experienced this?

ridewiththewind
11-18-2006, 02:28 PM
Lisa, I basically agree with most of what you said, particularly your preference for a cuemaker's shafts and design over laminated after-markets. However, your "disagreement" was with something that hadn't been stated. Gerry said, "The joint plays as big a part in the feel of a cue as does the tip, taper, ferrule, etc." I would certainly agree on the joint's contribution to a cue's feel. But I agree with you that the type of wood is a factor as well, in addition to the shaft taper, ferrule, tip and so on. I have two SW cues. Both have wonderful resonance, but one (tulipwood) makes a mellow "pong" sound, and the other, made of cocobolo, makes a sharper "ping" sound, as if they were two different notes a few registers apart stuck on the same instrument. (The shafts are interchangeable, and the tonal difference is consistent with all the shafts.)

Another factor I'm becoming aware of is the contribution to the cue's resonance the A-bolt makes (the hidden joint that joins the handle to the nose). This seems to be a critical factor. What has opened my eyes to this is my displeasure with the hit of cues featuring a full length core, without an A-bolt. I find they feel dull, almost inert, compared to a properly constructed A-bolt design. I've only tried 5-6 cues of this type, but their hit was pretty consistent--super solid, but with no feel and a very quiet almost resonance-free hit. Logically, this design would seem better--stronger--but they don't feel right to me. I wonder if anyone else has experienced this?

Ted, thanks for pointing that out...I wasn't actually disagreeing with Gerry's post, per se, but in the general theory that tends to resonate here in the forums that the shaft, ferrule, and tip are the major factors in a cue's respective performance.

I am currently playing with a full splice cue with a wood/wood joint with a Radial pin, no weight bolt...the shaft has a shorter taper than most, with a linen phenolic ferrule and Moori M tip...and it is one of THE most responsive, solid cues I have ever shot with! I just love the way it plays...very stiff. I would never consider going with an after-market shaft for this cue...if I want to go stiffer still, I'll spend the same amount of money as one of the after-market shafts and get a Timeless Timber shaft from the maker...thus preserving the cues overall performance qualities.

Lisa

JoeyInCali
11-18-2006, 02:32 PM
Another factor I'm becoming aware of is the contribution to the cue's resonance the A-bolt makes (the hidden joint that joins the handle to the nose). This seems to be a critical factor. What has opened my eyes to this is my displeasure with the hit of cues featuring a full length core, without an A-bolt. I find they feel dull, almost inert, compared to a properly constructed A-bolt design. I've only tried 5-6 cues of this type, but their hit was pretty consistent--super solid, but with no feel and a very quiet almost resonance-free hit. Logically, this design would seem better--stronger--but they don't feel right to me. I wonder if anyone else has experienced this?


You're not alone.
But, the bolt has nothing to do with it imo.
It's the wood.

tedkaufman
11-18-2006, 02:45 PM
Another factor I'm becoming aware of is the contribution to the cue's resonance the A-bolt makes (the hidden joint that joins the handle to the nose). This seems to be a critical factor. What has opened my eyes to this is my displeasure with the hit of cues featuring a full length core, without an A-bolt. I find they feel dull, almost inert, compared to a properly constructed A-bolt design. I've only tried 5-6 cues of this type, but their hit was pretty consistent--super solid, but with no feel and a very quiet almost resonance-free hit. Logically, this design would seem better--stronger--but they don't feel right to me. I wonder if anyone else has experienced this?


You're not alone.
But, the bolt has nothing to do with it imo.
It's the wood.

What do you mean "It's the wood"? The wood core or the choice of woods in the cue?

JoeyInCali
11-18-2006, 02:54 PM
What do you mean "It's the wood"? The wood core or the choice of woods in the cue?
The combination of all woods imo.

Full-splice cues still cost thousands w/out A-joint bolts.

BarenbruggeCues
11-18-2006, 03:35 PM
The only time the *A bolt* becomes a factor is if it becomes loose!
The cue/cylinder resonates on the outside. If it didn't......how would a hollow cue/cylinder resonate?
Definately the wood choices used that creates the difference.
This is why only certain woods are used in musical instruments.
Just my thoughts on this very delicate subject!

JoeyInCali
11-18-2006, 03:41 PM
The only time the *A bolt* becomes a factor is if it becomes loose!
The cue/cylinder resonates on the outside. If it didn't......how would a hollow cue/cylinder resonate?
Definately the wood choices used that creates the difference.
This is why only certain woods are more prominately used in musical instruments.
Just my thoughts on this very delicate subject!
I bet you have carpal tunnel syndrome in your left hand already.
Just the left hand.:D
Send me all of your Brazilian rosewoods.
I'll send you connecting screws. :D

Pushout
11-18-2006, 03:50 PM
For instance, I can definitely tell the difference in 'feel' between an ebony-nosed butt and a maple-nosed one.
Lisa


I agree. Couple of years ago, a friend who buys and sells a LOT of custom cues and I had a discusion about this. I noted that I've owned two ebony butt cues in my life. They both felt and played very different than the maple butt cues I've owned. I've owned cocobolo butt cues that felt different, but that I've played well with. I've played well with straight grain and birdseye maple. But I didn't play well with either of the ebony ones. I think wood choice may play a bigger role in how the cue "feels" than a lot of people think.

ridewiththewind
11-18-2006, 04:07 PM
I completely agree that wood plays a real big role in how a cue 'feels'...or in perceived 'feedback'.

I used to play acoustic guitar, and considered being luthier as a second career. It was when I got my understanding of the different resonant qualities of natural tonewoods...maple, rosewoods, ebony, claro walnut, koa, mahogany and saeple mahogany, western red cedar, and spruce. The latter two being too soft for anything but the tops of guitars...and certainly not suitable for cues.

I believe that the reason the masters of cuemaking used primarily maple, rosewood, and ebony was not because of the limited availablity of other woods, such as is available today, but because they understood the resonance in these particular woods...lending themselves to greater 'feedback', making for a better playing cue. I also believe that the more a guitar/cue is played, the more the wood 'opens up' giving greater resonance. Which would explain why older guitars sound better than newer ones, and why older cues just seem to play better than newer ones. :D

Lisa

BarenbruggeCues
11-18-2006, 04:19 PM
I bet you have carpal tunnel syndrome in your left hand already.
Just the left hand.:D
Send me all of your Brazilian rosewoods.
I'll send you connecting screws. :D

Hey I type with my right index finger also!
I wish I had some Brazilian rosewood!!!

BarenbruggeCues
11-18-2006, 04:22 PM
I believe that the reason the masters of cuemaking used primarily maple, rosewood, and ebony was not because of the limited availablity of other woods, such as is available today, but because they understood the resonance in these particular woods
.................................................. .................................................. .
Well said......

JoeyInCali
11-18-2006, 04:23 PM
Hey I type with my right index finger also!
Me too.
The heel of my left hand is worn out. I'm gonna start using the top of my head from now on. It'd be closer to my ear too.

ridewiththewind
11-18-2006, 04:40 PM
I believe that the reason the masters of cuemaking used primarily maple, rosewood, and ebony was not because of the limited availablity of other woods, such as is available today, but because they understood the resonance in these particular woods
.................................................. .................................................. .
Well said......

Why, thank you...I have a 'thing' for wood.:eek: ;)

RSB-Refugee
11-18-2006, 05:42 PM
I also believe that the more a guitar/cue is played, the more the wood 'opens up' giving greater resonance. Which would explain why older guitars sound better than newer ones, and why older cues just seem to play better than newer ones. :D

Lisa
Tap, tap, tap!

Tracy

ridewiththewind
11-18-2006, 05:50 PM
Tap, tap, tap!

Tracy

Thanks Tracy....I also think it's why my personal preference is for wood/wood contact @ the joint...it allows the cue to 'talk' to me more clearly than any other joint type I have tried.:cool:

Lisa

issycue
11-18-2006, 08:01 PM
I think the joint collar also plays a part...if there is a collar. I like the type that is sleeved over the forearm wood, leaving much of the forearm wood exposed to butt up to the shaft wood. My Bender is that way, so was a Josswest i had (this was a radial flat faced), and my Mike Capone was that way too...

As for the cues I play with, I have a Dave Jones 6pt short splice which is sleeved the way I like it... and a Shmelke fullsplice blank re-tapered sneaky pete w/custom shaft and sleeved collar. The shafts are interchangeable...both have leather wraps. The Shmelke plays very 'snappy' and 'crisp' (lots of vibration) whereas the Dave Jones plays with much less vibration. Both cues offer solid feel against the cueball, but obviously different feedback. I'm sure the differences are attributable to more than just the shaft.

alstl
11-18-2006, 08:31 PM
Up until recently I have been playing almost exclusively with Predator cues and the Z shaft. I love my Z shafts! Can't be without one. All my cues and shafts have the Uni-Lock joint and are interchangable. No matter which combination of butt and shaft I played, they pretty much all felt the same. I also use Talisman WB hard tips on all my shafts.

Recently I purchased a custom cue with a SS piloted 5/16x14 joint and immediately ordered a Z shaft for it with the Talisman WB hard tip. I expected it to play and feel close to the same as my Predator cues, with the exception of weight and balance point, based on what I've read here in the past about the feel of the cue coming mostly from the joint, shaft, and tip. This cue feels nothing like my Predators. It has a much stiffer and crisper hit, I love it! A week later I came across a deal on a Schon LTD that I couldn't pass up. Schons have the same SS piloted 5/16x14 joint. Of course I ordered it with a Z shaft so I would have a spare in my case. This Schon hits harder and crisper than the custom using the same shaft. I now have my new playing cue.

My question is how is it that two different cues of roughly the same weight, balance point, and joint, using the same shafts, feel so different? I would think that this example disproves the notion that most of the feel you get from a cue comes from the shaft.

What exactly do you like about the Z shaft? What is the difference between a Z and a regular shaft?

tedkaufman
11-18-2006, 08:48 PM
I think the joint collar also plays a part...if there is a collar. I like the type that is sleeved over the forearm wood, leaving much of the forearm wood exposed to butt up to the shaft wood. My Bender is that way, so was a Josswest i had (this was a radial flat faced), and my Mike Capone was that way too...

I agree completely. That's why ivory joints never made sense to me, at least compared to flat-faced wood/wood. Ivory (either ff or piloted) is a slight improvement over the feel of a SS piloted.

lights_out
11-19-2006, 02:11 AM
Ted, thanks for pointing that out...I wasn't actually disagreeing with Gerry's post, per se, but in the general theory that tends to resonate here in the forums that the shaft, ferrule, and tip are the major factors in a cue's respective performance.

I am currently playing with a full splice cue with a wood/wood joint with a Radial pin, no weight bolt...the shaft has a shorter taper than most, with a linen phenolic ferrule and Moori M tip...and it is one of THE most responsive, solid cues I have ever shot with! I just love the way it plays...very stiff. I would never consider going with an after-market shaft for this cue...if I want to go stiffer still, I'll spend the same amount of money as one of the after-market shafts and get a Timeless Timber shaft from the maker...thus preserving the cues overall performance qualities.

Lisa

Thanks for your reply Lisa. I'm not gonna disagree with you about anything you said. The custom cue I have has two matching shafts which play very well. The reason I play it with the laminated shaft is over the years I've gotten so accustomed to the way the Z shaft plays I am confident with it and know how it plays as opposed to the shafts that came with the cue. I tried the fitted shafts, and while they play and feel great, they are unpredictable to me in how I must play them when I use english.

lights_out
11-19-2006, 02:18 AM
The joint plays as big a part in the feel of a cue as does the tip, taper, ferrule, etc. Some people will disagree with me on this, but I know it to be true IMO.

The other thing you will find is that cues from the same maker with the same build can hit very differently. With the different piece of wood, drying time, how many cuts and how close together, and even as little as a couple mil difference in thickness will change the cue dramatically.

I have come to the conclusion that the best cues, no matter the make or build, have a certain vibration frequency to their hit. I think when someone likes the "feel" a cue, they are referring to the way the impact of the tip to the cue ball travels to their hand via energy/vibration.

I think some very smart cue builder will someday design a piece of equipment to test the vibration of a cues hit, and market each cue with a designation of that vibration number. We could also see the difference when a tip is changed, and what that does to the feel, .......because FEEL is subjective, and very hard to explain to another person, or cue builder.

Maybe I'll build something today?!:D

Gerry

I agree with you completely about the resonance and energy/vibration of a cue. The Predators all have the same muted feel which transfers little feedback, to me at least. While I'm not knocking Predator's products, I think they make a great cue, I just love the feedback I'm getting from my Schon. When you do build that test equipment, let me know, I'll be your first customer!

lights_out
11-19-2006, 02:23 AM
What exactly do you like about the Z shaft? What is the difference between a Z and a regular shaft?

The Z shaft has a smaller taper and due to the qualities built into it (hollow core, short and flexible ferrule, less mass, etc.), it causes less deflection when using english. I'm not saying cuemakers don't make a shaft with less deflection but I'm used to the way the Z shaft plays and can make shots using side time after time without having to think about how much to compensate. I also use a very tight closed bridge and have big hands. The small taper is just more comfortable for me.

ridewiththewind
11-19-2006, 02:34 AM
Thanks for your reply Lisa. I'm not gonna disagree with you about anything you said. The custom cue I have has two matching shafts which play very well. The reason I play it with the laminated shaft is over the years I've gotten so accustomed to the way the Z shaft plays I am confident with it and know how it plays as opposed to the shafts that came with the cue. I tried the fitted shafts, and while they play and feel great, they are unpredictable to me in how I must play them when I use english.

Old habits are hard to break...;) LOL! j/k :D

buddha162
11-19-2006, 03:02 AM
Forearm wood makes a HUGE difference in feel. Example: 2 Skip Westons I own, one maple one ebony...identical specs, joint material, and I assume A-joint configeration/material as well, all matching predator shafts.

The Ebony one hits hard and solid, pings beautifully; the maple one hits soft and somewhat mushy.

As for joint configerations: I've never picked up a uni-loc cue that I liked, and I've hit with over a dozen...production and custom, a wide swath of cues that are just worthless imo.

-Roger

BarenbruggeCues
11-19-2006, 09:15 AM
Hey I type with my right index finger also!
Me too.
The heel of my left hand is worn out. I'm gonna start using the top of my head from now on. It'd be closer to my ear too.

Ah yes.........very understandable! The sound waves have less air to travel through that way also!!

Snapshot9
11-19-2006, 09:29 AM
making love, although you may get enthused with various parts at times, in the end, you realize that it is everything together that makes it so great.

or in more general terms, The whole is greater than the sum of its parts.

alstl
11-19-2006, 10:45 AM
The Z shaft has a smaller taper and due to the qualities built into it (hollow core, short and flexible ferrule, less mass, etc.), it causes less deflection when using english. I'm not saying cuemakers don't make a shaft with less deflection but I'm used to the way the Z shaft plays and can make shots using side time after time without having to think about how much to compensate. I also use a very tight closed bridge and have big hands. The small taper is just more comfortable for me.

I have a Schon and used to have a 314 that I played with. I sent the original shaft to Evan Clarke at Schon to have him trim it to 12.75 mm and after that I sold the 314 and I haven't played with anything else since. I'm interested in the Z because it represents a pretty radical departure from the ordinary, but I don't want to spend $200 just to experiment with it.

Thanks,
Al

80none
11-19-2006, 06:34 PM
Ted, thanks for pointing that out...I wasn't actually disagreeing with Gerry's post, per se, but in the general theory that tends to resonate here in the forums that the shaft, ferrule, and tip are the major factors in a cue's respective performance.

I am currently playing with a full splice cue with a wood/wood joint with a Radial pin, no weight bolt...the shaft has a shorter taper than most, with a linen phenolic ferrule and Moori M tip...and it is one of THE most responsive, solid cues I have ever shot with! I just love the way it plays...very stiff. I would never consider going with an after-market shaft for this cue...if I want to go stiffer still, I'll spend the same amount of money as one of the after-market shafts and get a Timeless Timber shaft from the maker...thus preserving the cues overall performance qualities.

Lisa
i have two cues, one being full splice and the other short splice. short splice is supposed to have A joint. i noticed that full one feels to convey wider band of frequency compared to short one, especially in lower frequencies. thus, full one 'booms' while short one 'pings' on hitting.

i would like to see frequency spectrums of various cues picked up at the handle very much. or the resonance analysis can be a subject in computer aided physics.

i might not be able to attribute the difference to the presence of A joint because many other factors are different too; shaft joint, point wood, shaft taper and tips are all different.

Gerry
11-20-2006, 05:28 AM
I agree with you completely about the resonance and energy/vibration of a cue. The Predators all have the same muted feel which transfers little feedback, to me at least. While I'm not knocking Predator's products, I think they make a great cue, I just love the feedback I'm getting from my Schon. When you do build that test equipment, let me know, I'll be your first customer!


I'll let you know if I get it right Steve!...I went through experimenting with Predators from the day they were built. I too felt they had a muted hit, and I lost feel on delicate shots. I also play with Schon cues, and feel they have some of the best shaft/taper/ferrule/tip combos out there.

If you get the chance, try one of Lucasi's radial spliced shafts. I have 2 of them and an LE 27 Lucasi that plays like a mix of a Predator, and a Schon.

Gerry

xidica
11-20-2006, 05:34 AM
Up until recently I have been playing almost exclusively with Predator cues and the Z shaft. I love my Z shafts! Can't be without one. All my cues and shafts have the Uni-Lock joint and are interchangable. No matter which combination of butt and shaft I played, they pretty much all felt the same. I also use Talisman WB hard tips on all my shafts.

Recently I purchased a custom cue with a SS piloted 5/16x14 joint and immediately ordered a Z shaft for it with the Talisman WB hard tip. I expected it to play and feel close to the same as my Predator cues, with the exception of weight and balance point, based on what I've read here in the past about the feel of the cue coming mostly from the joint, shaft, and tip. This cue feels nothing like my Predators. It has a much stiffer and crisper hit, I love it! A week later I came across a deal on a Schon LTD that I couldn't pass up. Schons have the same SS piloted 5/16x14 joint. Of course I ordered it with a Z shaft so I would have a spare in my case. This Schon hits harder and crisper than the custom using the same shaft. I now have my new playing cue.

My question is how is it that two different cues of roughly the same weight, balance point, and joint, using the same shafts, feel so different? I would think that this example disproves the notion that most of the feel you get from a cue comes from the shaft.

Similar :
Weight/Balance Point/Joint/Shafts

Possible Differences :
Length/Wood/Tip/Ferrule/Joint Material

The biggest thing you have to understand is that in all reality, if the above four factors don't account for it; it may be all mental.

Congrats!

DaveK
11-20-2006, 08:40 AM
I think some very smart cue builder will someday design a piece of equipment to test the vibration of a cues hit, and market each cue with a designation of that vibration number.

I have a couple of piezo sensors for exactly this purpose. Unfortunately the project is a little down the list :( and I'm not very smart nor am I a cue maker.

Dave