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mthornto
11-20-2006, 03:15 PM
Last Friday afternoon I unexpectedly had a couple of hours to kill. I ended up in a poohall. Go figure. I only make it into this room a couple of times a year. The place is known for having very strong players to say the least. The place has a mix of 8 or so 7 foot Valley tables, 8 or so 8 foot Diamonds, 4 9 foot diamonds and 2 billiards tables.

I walk in Friday shortly after lunch. I only have about and hour and a half until I have to go, I expect to just practice a bit. I get some balls and start on Joe Tucker’s brainwash drill. This is a fun way to pass some time.

It does not take long until the guy playing at another 9 foot table starts in wanting to play. “Wanna play some? A little nine ball?” I politely decline, tell him I have to leave soon and that I don’t care much for 9 ball anyhow. “We can play eight ball.” I tell him maybe in a little bit.

I don’t know this guy and I have never seen him before. Of course, that means very little. There are tons of strong players I don’t know. I don’t get out much. However, I can put two and two together. Since walking in I have seen him chatting with the bartender and a couple of other guys I vaguely recognize. He must be at least somewhat regular in the local scene. Any regular at this place that challenges a stranger is going to be at least a couple of balls better then me.

About 5 minutes later he asks “Ready now?” He has been persistent in trying to get me to play, but in a decent way. Not barking, not trying to make a scene out of me not playing him. At this point, I believe that if I tell him I am not interested in playing him today he would drop the whole thing. In my mind, this makes him an ok guy so I decide that I will play him if he is willing to play cheap.

I am fairly confident that he would kill me playing 9 ball. I am not a strong player and I play 9 ball particularly bad. Something about that game just gets in my head and eats away at me. 8 ball is a possibility. I like the game. Still, I have to expect this guy play a pretty sporty game of 8 ball also. Since I am only going to play if we agree on a low wager, I don’t want to ask for a spot. Asking for a spot from a guy I don’t know when playing for a low amount is way to nitty for me. I am not worried about getting robbed, and it would be nice to get into a game that I might have a chance of winning. So a reply, “Yea, I’m ready. How about straight pool?”

This guy could be a straight pool monster, I don’t know, but I figure this is the only game where I may have an edge. He is a young guy, I would guess early twenties. There is a good chance that he has played little if any straights. I am hoping I am more knowledgeable about the game and that will even out his stronger playing skills. I am hoping for a good match up.

He agrees, says he has only played a couple of times. We will use his table. Looking at the time, I only have just over an hour to play. Not a lot of time for straight pool. I suggest we play to 50. He agrees. The subject of money has not come up yet. I break the ice and ask “What do you want to play for?” He says it does matter. I let him know that I will not play for much. He says name the amount. I suggest $20. “No problem” he says.

I rack the balls up and ask him if he want to lag of flip for the break. “Naw, you can break.” This throws me a bit. Could be he really does not know the game and he thinks the break is an advantage like in every other game. Or, he knows the game. Either way, I am ok breaking. I actually prefer to break. Most of the time I have a good break and I leave either no shot or a hard shot.

I take the opening break and make a good one. Two balls, the correct two balls, pop out to the rail and back. The opposite corner balls comes back to the pack, the ball I struck rolls up to the side and about a half ball past the bottom of the rack. The cue goes back deep in the kitchen. Not on the rail, but not hanging out in the middle either. Not an easy shot. Miss to thick the rack will get splatted.

My opponent steps up and play safe, contacting the loose ball putting the cue back up table. If he does not play straight pool, he certainly plays enough pool to avoid obvious mistakes. We trade safeties back a forth for a few innings. He certainly can play a good safety, but I have the better safety game.

At this point, I still really don’t know how good he can play. While I do enjoy trading safeties back and forth until somebody blows it, I prefer something different. The problem with trading safeties until your opponent leaves you a shot is that often the shot does not lead too much. I much prefer to play a safety that leaves a hard shot that will break out balls. More often than not, out of frustration, my opponent will go for the shot, miss, and sell out.

I see a way to play into the rack, leaving a clear shot on a ball in the cluster to the far end of the table. Not a real tough cut, but the cue and object balls are only a couple of inches apart and the shot is long. I think most straight pool players would let this one go. He steps up and drills it. Nothing but net.

The table is not mostly open. He runs five more balls before missing. I think, wow, I was wrong, he is not that good. The first shot was a great shot, but only getting five more balls with an open table says a lot. I can beat this guy easy. Of course, he could be stalling, but I already told him I have to leave at 3, so I did not see much point in that.

I step up to the table confident that I can win this game. Realize that I had not shot a single ball at a pocket yet and we are using his table, not the one I was warming up on. I look the layout over, identify the areas I need to take care of and set to work. Plop, plop, plop go the balls until my seventh shot where I miss. I only managed 6! I was shocked I missed such an easy shot, but it happens. However, something does not seem right. I was not really comfortable on any shot. Then it hits me, wow are these pockets small.

All the nine foot tables are Diamonds, the one I was warming up on had 4.5 inch pockets like I am use to. This was tighter. I grab two balls from the corner pocket and do a quick measure. Holy crap, I have never seen a table this tight. At best, they are 4 inches at the opening.

To make a long story a little shorter, I fell apart. Every time I got down on a shot I was scared. I would second guess my aim and way under hit the ball. I would either miss the shot completely or come up way short of position. The six was my best run of the game. Pathetic, I was sharked by pockets.

I ended up losing 35-50. My opponent never did show much straight pool ability, but I really don’t know if he was holding back or telling me the whole story. It’s hard to say. He did try to get me to play again, but I had no time.

What this table did was expose and magnify all my flaws. The biggest being that I can get knocked out of my game mentally pretty easily. I think it I would have been better off if I had not actually measured the pockets with a couple of balls. While I still would have realized they were tight, I would not have had the 4” number stuck in my head eating away like cancer.

I am now convinced that 4” pockets are the work of the devil. I mean really, isn’t straight pool is about patterns and knowledge? Super tight pockets just don’t seem to fit very well into the spirit of the game. Or, I may just still be a little pissed over the loss.

Anyhow, no real point, just a little slow today at work so I thought I would share.

Wally in Cincy
11-20-2006, 04:41 PM
Last year our Cincy Straight Pool League moved to Michael's where most of the 9-footers are tight Diamonds. It can be quite frustrating when you shoot a ball down the rail at a slow to medium speed and it rattles.

I try to get there early and snag a table with more forgiving pockets. I never understood the need for extremely tight pockets but then again I am not that good of a player either.

JoeyA
11-20-2006, 08:19 PM
Last Friday afternoon I unexpectedly had a couple of hours to kill. I ended up in a poohall. Go figure. I only make it into this room a couple of times a year. The place is known for having very strong players to say the least. The place has a mix of 8 or so 7 foot Valley tables, 8 or so 8 foot Diamonds, 4 9 foot diamonds and 2 billiards tables.

I walk in Friday shortly after lunch. I only have about and hour and a half until I have to go, I expect to just practice a bit. I get some balls and start on Joe Tucker’s brainwash drill. This is a fun way to pass some time.

It does not take long until the guy playing at another 9 foot table starts in wanting to play. “Wanna play some? A little nine ball?” I politely decline, tell him I have to leave soon and that I don’t care much for 9 ball anyhow. “We can play eight ball.” I tell him maybe in a little bit.

I don’t know this guy and I have never seen him before. Of course, that means very little. There are tons of strong players I don’t know. I don’t get out much. However, I can put two and two together. Since walking in I have seen him chatting with the bartender and a couple of other guys I vaguely recognize. He must be at least somewhat regular in the local scene. Any regular at this place that challenges a stranger is going to be at least a couple of balls better then me.

About 5 minutes later he asks “Ready now?” He has been persistent in trying to get me to play, but in a decent way. Not barking, not trying to make a scene out of me not playing him. At this point, I believe that if I tell him I am not interested in playing him today he would drop the whole thing. In my mind, this makes him an ok guy so I decide that I will play him if he is willing to play cheap.

I am fairly confident that he would kill me playing 9 ball. I am not a strong player and I play 9 ball particularly bad. Something about that game just gets in my head and eats away at me. 8 ball is a possibility. I like the game. Still, I have to expect this guy play a pretty sporty game of 8 ball also. Since I am only going to play if we agree on a low wager, I don’t want to ask for a spot. Asking for a spot from a guy I don’t know when playing for a low amount is way to nitty for me. I am not worried about getting robbed, and it would be nice to get into a game that I might have a chance of winning. So a reply, “Yea, I’m ready. How about straight pool?”

This guy could be a straight pool monster, I don’t know, but I figure this is the only game where I may have an edge. He is a young guy, I would guess early twenties. There is a good chance that he has played little if any straights. I am hoping I am more knowledgeable about the game and that will even out his stronger playing skills. I am hoping for a good match up.

He agrees, says he has only played a couple of times. We will use his table. Looking at the time, I only have just over an hour to play. Not a lot of time for straight pool. I suggest we play to 50. He agrees. The subject of money has not come up yet. I break the ice and ask “What do you want to play for?” He says it does matter. I let him know that I will not play for much. He says name the amount. I suggest $20. “No problem” he says.

I rack the balls up and ask him if he want to lag of flip for the break. “Naw, you can break.” This throws me a bit. Could be he really does not know the game and he thinks the break is an advantage like in every other game. Or, he knows the game. Either way, I am ok breaking. I actually prefer to break. Most of the time I have a good break and I leave either no shot or a hard shot.

I take the opening break and make a good one. Two balls, the correct two balls, pop out to the rail and back. The opposite corner balls comes back to the pack, the ball I struck rolls up to the side and about a half ball past the bottom of the rack. The cue goes back deep in the kitchen. Not on the rail, but not hanging out in the middle either. Not an easy shot. Miss to thick the rack will get splatted.

My opponent steps up and play safe, contacting the loose ball putting the cue back up table. If he does not play straight pool, he certainly plays enough pool to avoid obvious mistakes. We trade safeties back a forth for a few innings. He certainly can play a good safety, but I have the better safety game.

At this point, I still really don’t know how good he can play. While I do enjoy trading safeties back and forth until somebody blows it, I prefer something different. The problem with trading safeties until your opponent leaves you a shot is that often the shot does not lead too much. I much prefer to play a safety that leaves a hard shot that will break out balls. More often than not, out of frustration, my opponent will go for the shot, miss, and sell out.

I see a way to play into the rack, leaving a clear shot on a ball in the cluster to the far end of the table. Not a real tough cut, but the cue and object balls are only a couple of inches apart and the shot is long. I think most straight pool players would let this one go. He steps up and drills it. Nothing but net.

The table is not mostly open. He runs five more balls before missing. I think, wow, I was wrong, he is not that good. The first shot was a great shot, but only getting five more balls with an open table says a lot. I can beat this guy easy. Of course, he could be stalling, but I already told him I have to leave at 3, so I did not see much point in that.

I step up to the table confident that I can win this game. Realize that I had not shot a single ball at a pocket yet and we are using his table, not the one I was warming up on. I look the layout over, identify the areas I need to take care of and set to work. Plop, plop, plop go the balls until my seventh shot where I miss. I only managed 6! I was shocked I missed such an easy shot, but it happens. However, something does not seem right. I was not really comfortable on any shot. Then it hits me, wow are these pockets small.

All the nine foot tables are Diamonds, the one I was warming up on had 4.5 inch pockets like I am use to. This was tighter. I grab two balls from the corner pocket and do a quick measure. Holy crap, I have never seen a table this tight. At best, they are 4 inches at the opening.

To make a long story a little shorter, I fell apart. Every time I got down on a shot I was scared. I would second guess my aim and way under hit the ball. I would either miss the shot completely or come up way short of position. The six was my best run of the game. Pathetic, I was sharked by pockets.

I ended up losing 35-50. My opponent never did show much straight pool ability, but I really don’t know if he was holding back or telling me the whole story. It’s hard to say. He did try to get me to play again, but I had no time.

What this table did was expose and magnify all my flaws. The biggest being that I can get knocked out of my game mentally pretty easily. I think it I would have been better off if I had not actually measured the pockets with a couple of balls. While I still would have realized they were tight, I would not have had the 4” number stuck in my head eating away like cancer.

I am now convinced that 4” pockets are the work of the devil. I mean really, isn’t straight pool is about patterns and knowledge? Super tight pockets just don’t seem to fit very well into the spirit of the game. Or, I may just still be a little pissed over the loss.

Anyhow, no real point, just a little slow today at work so I thought I would share.

Personally, I believe that pockets that are 4" are designed for playing one pocket, not nine ball, eight ball, straight pool or any other game. Unless you are one of those guys who "baits and waits" for a big spot in nine ball on a tight pocketed table. It doesn't sound like you are one of those. Many people who are of average ability seem to like to play on super tight tables. They say that they like the toughness of the tighter pockets but in my opinion, (when playing nine ball) they simply like getting more shots and if they are getting big weight, it comes up in nine ball more so than one pocket.

I am interested in knowing if people like John Schmidt, believe that playing nine ball on super tight pockets is the best table to be practicing nine ball in order to become a better player. I don't think so because you can't cheat pockets easily nor can you power balls into the hole nor can you develop the confidence of running multiple racks consistently. It will teach you some other things but you can't unleash your whole aresenal on super tight pocketed tables. When I see John I will ask him if the super tight pocketed tables are good for average players.
JoeyA

5ballcharlie
11-20-2006, 09:39 PM
I have a 9ft gold crown with 3 7/8 pockets. Straight pool is tough on it and so is 9 ball. I kinda agree with joeyA I think these super tight tables are better for golf or one pocket. But do not get to dissapointed, because if you practiced on these tables everyday you could run balls on them. On my table I have beaten the 9 ball ghost racing to 7 plenty of times and just tonight I ran 38 balls at straight pool on it. My best on this table is 42 but I dont play much straight pool. One more thing joe tuckers stuff is the best keep at that corner pocket workout.

JoeyA
11-21-2006, 07:44 AM
I have a 9ft gold crown with 3 7/8 pockets. Straight pool is tough on it and so is 9 ball. I kinda agree with joeyA I think these super tight tables are better for golf or one pocket. But do not get to dissapointed, because if you practiced on these tables everyday you could run balls on them. On my table I have beaten the 9 ball ghost racing to 7 plenty of times and just tonight I ran 38 balls at straight pool on it. My best on this table is 42 but I dont play much straight pool. One more thing joe tuckers stuff is the best keep at that corner pocket workout.

Charlie, I know that on tight pocketed tables it is possible to drop balls faster than Paris Hilton's panties and sometimes even run multiple racks on but at least for myself, it is difficult to maintain the level of concentration and relaxation that is necessary to do it consistently. I find myself playing very well for maybe an hour or so, then out of the blue I botch a "relatively easy shot" and it takes another 30 minutes or even 60 minutes to get back to my best level of play. These tight pocketed tables can jar you faster than an opponent waving and grinning to his half-naked girl friend.

JoeyA

5ballcharlie
11-21-2006, 09:40 AM
Charlie, I know that on tight pocketed tables it is possible to drop balls faster than Paris Hilton's panties and sometimes even run multiple racks on but at least for myself, it is difficult to maintain the level of concentration and relaxation that is necessary to do it consistently. I find myself playing very well for maybe an hour or so, then out of the blue I botch a "relatively easy shot" and it takes another 30 minutes or even 60 minutes to get back to my best level of play. These tight pocketed tables can jar you faster than an opponent waving and grinning to his half-naked girl friend.

JoeyA
amen to that.

5ballcharlie
11-21-2006, 09:47 AM
Last Friday afternoon I unexpectedly had a couple of hours to kill. I ended up in a poohall. Go figure. I only make it into this room a couple of times a year. The place is known for having very strong players to say the least. The place has a mix of 8 or so 7 foot Valley tables, 8 or so 8 foot Diamonds, 4 9 foot diamonds and 2 billiards tables.

I walk in Friday shortly after lunch. I only have about and hour and a half until I have to go, I expect to just practice a bit. I get some balls and start on Joe Tucker’s brainwash drill. This is a fun way to pass some time.

It does not take long until the guy playing at another 9 foot table starts in wanting to play. “Wanna play some? A little nine ball?” I politely decline, tell him I have to leave soon and that I don’t care much for 9 ball anyhow. “We can play eight ball.” I tell him maybe in a little bit.

I don’t know this guy and I have never seen him before. Of course, that means very little. There are tons of strong players I don’t know. I don’t get out much. However, I can put two and two together. Since walking in I have seen him chatting with the bartender and a couple of other guys I vaguely recognize. He must be at least somewhat regular in the local scene. Any regular at this place that challenges a stranger is going to be at least a couple of balls better then me.

About 5 minutes later he asks “Ready now?” He has been persistent in trying to get me to play, but in a decent way. Not barking, not trying to make a scene out of me not playing him. At this point, I believe that if I tell him I am not interested in playing him today he would drop the whole thing. In my mind, this makes him an ok guy so I decide that I will play him if he is willing to play cheap.

I am fairly confident that he would kill me playing 9 ball. I am not a strong player and I play 9 ball particularly bad. Something about that game just gets in my head and eats away at me. 8 ball is a possibility. I like the game. Still, I have to expect this guy play a pretty sporty game of 8 ball also. Since I am only going to play if we agree on a low wager, I don’t want to ask for a spot. Asking for a spot from a guy I don’t know when playing for a low amount is way to nitty for me. I am not worried about getting robbed, and it would be nice to get into a game that I might have a chance of winning. So a reply, “Yea, I’m ready. How about straight pool?”

This guy could be a straight pool monster, I don’t know, but I figure this is the only game where I may have an edge. He is a young guy, I would guess early twenties. There is a good chance that he has played little if any straights. I am hoping I am more knowledgeable about the game and that will even out his stronger playing skills. I am hoping for a good match up.

He agrees, says he has only played a couple of times. We will use his table. Looking at the time, I only have just over an hour to play. Not a lot of time for straight pool. I suggest we play to 50. He agrees. The subject of money has not come up yet. I break the ice and ask “What do you want to play for?” He says it does matter. I let him know that I will not play for much. He says name the amount. I suggest $20. “No problem” he says.

I rack the balls up and ask him if he want to lag of flip for the break. “Naw, you can break.” This throws me a bit. Could be he really does not know the game and he thinks the break is an advantage like in every other game. Or, he knows the game. Either way, I am ok breaking. I actually prefer to break. Most of the time I have a good break and I leave either no shot or a hard shot.

I take the opening break and make a good one. Two balls, the correct two balls, pop out to the rail and back. The opposite corner balls comes back to the pack, the ball I struck rolls up to the side and about a half ball past the bottom of the rack. The cue goes back deep in the kitchen. Not on the rail, but not hanging out in the middle either. Not an easy shot. Miss to thick the rack will get splatted.

My opponent steps up and play safe, contacting the loose ball putting the cue back up table. If he does not play straight pool, he certainly plays enough pool to avoid obvious mistakes. We trade safeties back a forth for a few innings. He certainly can play a good safety, but I have the better safety game.

At this point, I still really don’t know how good he can play. While I do enjoy trading safeties back and forth until somebody blows it, I prefer something different. The problem with trading safeties until your opponent leaves you a shot is that often the shot does not lead too much. I much prefer to play a safety that leaves a hard shot that will break out balls. More often than not, out of frustration, my opponent will go for the shot, miss, and sell out.

I see a way to play into the rack, leaving a clear shot on a ball in the cluster to the far end of the table. Not a real tough cut, but the cue and object balls are only a couple of inches apart and the shot is long. I think most straight pool players would let this one go. He steps up and drills it. Nothing but net.

The table is not mostly open. He runs five more balls before missing. I think, wow, I was wrong, he is not that good. The first shot was a great shot, but only getting five more balls with an open table says a lot. I can beat this guy easy. Of course, he could be stalling, but I already told him I have to leave at 3, so I did not see much point in that.

I step up to the table confident that I can win this game. Realize that I had not shot a single ball at a pocket yet and we are using his table, not the one I was warming up on. I look the layout over, identify the areas I need to take care of and set to work. Plop, plop, plop go the balls until my seventh shot where I miss. I only managed 6! I was shocked I missed such an easy shot, but it happens. However, something does not seem right. I was not really comfortable on any shot. Then it hits me, wow are these pockets small.

All the nine foot tables are Diamonds, the one I was warming up on had 4.5 inch pockets like I am use to. This was tighter. I grab two balls from the corner pocket and do a quick measure. Holy crap, I have never seen a table this tight. At best, they are 4 inches at the opening.

To make a long story a little shorter, I fell apart. Every time I got down on a shot I was scared. I would second guess my aim and way under hit the ball. I would either miss the shot completely or come up way short of position. The six was my best run of the game. Pathetic, I was sharked by pockets.

I ended up losing 35-50. My opponent never did show much straight pool ability, but I really don’t know if he was holding back or telling me the whole story. It’s hard to say. He did try to get me to play again, but I had no time.

What this table did was expose and magnify all my flaws. The biggest being that I can get knocked out of my game mentally pretty easily. I think it I would have been better off if I had not actually measured the pockets with a couple of balls. While I still would have realized they were tight, I would not have had the 4” number stuck in my head eating away like cancer.

I am now convinced that 4” pockets are the work of the devil. I mean really, isn’t straight pool is about patterns and knowledge? Super tight pockets just don’t seem to fit very well into the spirit of the game. Or, I may just still be a little pissed over the loss.

Anyhow, no real point, just a little slow today at work so I thought I would share.
check this link out www.propoolvideo.com looks like these pockets are about 4 inch

mthornto
11-21-2006, 01:44 PM
Personally, I believe that pockets that are 4" are designed for playing one pocket, not nine ball, eight ball, straight pool or any other game. Unless you are one of those guys who "baits and waits" for a big spot in nine ball on a tight pocketed table. It doesn't sound like you are one of those. Many people who are of average ability seem to like to play on super tight tables. They say that they like the toughness of the tighter pockets but in my opinion, (when playing nine ball) they simply like getting more shots and if they are getting big weight, it comes up in nine ball more so than one pocket.

I am interested in knowing if people like John Schmidt, believe that playing nine ball on super tight pockets is the best table to be practicing nine ball in order to become a better player. I don't think so because you can't cheat pockets easily nor can you power balls into the hole nor can you develop the confidence of running multiple racks consistently. It will teach you some other things but you can't unleash your whole aresenal on super tight pocketed tables. When I see John I will ask him if the super tight pocketed tables are good for average players.
JoeyA


I would also like to hear what John and others have to say about super tight pockets.

More and more I am agreeing with Greg from Diamond when he talks about the need to standardize pool tables. Last year at the DCC, he talked about trying to get together with other table makers to standardize pocket size, pocket depth, angle, how far the diamonds are from the rail, etc.

Williebetmore
11-21-2006, 02:38 PM
I would also like to hear what John and others have to say about super tight pockets.

More and more I am agreeing with Greg from Diamond when he talks about the need to standardize pool tables.

MT,
I think that there is a difference between tight and super-tight. If you need super-tight pockets, then just give up pool and switch to snooker.

My opinion is that the Diamonds at DCC are as tight as any table should be - anything more is a gimmick. They still allow the full range of English and power - and confer an advantage to the more skilled player. A professional friend does not think that tighter pockets than this are of any value to a beginning player - and that a mixture of play on tight and loose pockets is of definite value to the beginning player (beginning meaning any player less than pro status:) ). The pro also professes that the pocket sizes do not affect their play in any way; saying "hey, my target is 2 1/2 inches wide; there is PLENTY of room, no matter the pocket size."

For several years our league had a tricked up (triple-shimmed GC II or III) table we named "Jaws". I always enjoyed playing on it. You just need to "get your mind right Luke", learning to play on such tables can really help you focus on smaller target areas. When I play on them, I use the same stroke, the same English, and very similar strategy to the loose tables - resting assured that if I miss there will be another inning for me soon when my opponent misses into one of those f#$%ing tight side pockets.

P.S. - you still have an open invitation to Betmore's Basement if you are passing through; hope to see you at DCC.

JoeyA
11-22-2006, 11:10 AM
I would also like to hear what John and others have to say about super tight pockets.

More and more I am agreeing with Greg from Diamond when he talks about the need to standardize pool tables. Last year at the DCC, he talked about trying to get together with other table makers to standardize pocket size, pocket depth, angle, how far the diamonds are from the rail, etc.

I seriously doubt that any competitor of Diamond will make like good little boys and play nice, especially since Diamond has taken a large portion of their market share. It is highly unlikely. Uniqueness is what establishes identity. No one wants to be the like everyone else. Innovation brings change and change is always going to be perpetual. The market will ultimately decide what kiind of tables will be manufactured, sold and used.

I think Diamond has erred on the side of professionals (who don't all like Diamond tables) however many of the amateurs have accepted the changes and like the changes but don't fully realize how tight pocket tables will impact the evolution of their level of play both negatively and positively.

Diamond makes a great one pocket table. The pro cut Diamond table will teach you to have the patience of Job or make you find another hobby.
:-)
Just my $.02.
JoeyA

JoeyA
11-22-2006, 11:26 AM
[QUOTE=Williebetmore]

The pro also professes that the pocket sizes do not affect their play in any way; saying "hey, my target is 2 1/2 inches wide; there is PLENTY of room, no matter the pocket size."

I know you directed this at MT but my response to the above statement couldn't be held any longer:

"REALLY?"
Pocket size does not affect their play in any way.

Sure, they can still cheat pockets with mild abandon. Sure, they can still warp balls into gooden-tight pockets. Sure, they will still take that long straight seven foot shot at half of an already tight pocket even if it means losing the game. Sure, they don't change the speed of their stroke and let it all hang out. Sure, they don't pay more attention to holding the cue lighter than ever. Sure, when they are giving up weight playing nine rocket they look for the tightest table in the house. Sure, sure, sure. :-)

JoeyA (not so sure) (sure likes to get heavy-weight playing nine ball from the pros on super tight tables versus 5" wide pockets).

PlynSets
11-23-2006, 02:41 AM
check this link out www.propoolvideo.com looks like these pockets are about 4 inch

I watched some of those videos, and near as I can tell those look to be 4 and 1/4's to me..

DJ

Williebetmore
11-23-2006, 07:16 AM
"REALLY?"
Pocket size does not affect their play in any way.



JoeyA,
No, not really. The pro was saying this with tongue in cheek to some degree. Everyone knows that strategy is definitely affected, not only by strength of the opponent, but also by the tightness of the pockets (yes, you are correct, even the pro's).

The point the pro was trying to make was to not let it get into your head (which in our match was definitely the case for me), and also to learn to shoot to a smaller, more precise target. In addition, this pro was also pointing out that the experts are less bothered about it than me. Sorry for the confusion (no William Faulkner here); perhaps I should sell my cue and take a writing class or two.

P.S. - I've seen you play, and you should be GIVING the weight to some of those pro's.

5ballcharlie
11-23-2006, 10:04 AM
I watched some of those videos, and near as I can tell those look to be 4 and 1/4's to me..

DJ
that could be right.

ShootingArts
11-23-2006, 11:09 AM
It's pretty easy for anyone to get rattled when they are blind sided. A good reminder to everyone to check out the table and cue ball when swapping tables. I tried to spend a couple hours a day shooting on a snooker table for touch and accuracy and compete on standard tables. It was easy to play both when I did it daily and nothing like shooting the tight pockets or tight pockets with rounded corners to build confidence when you are shooting at the buckets.

I rattled mightily when they swapped cue balls in my first tournament in twenty years or so. I don't play bar tables anymore so I had spent an hour or so tuning on the bar table. Swapping the cue ball definitely changed the rolls quite a bit but the real problem was what it did to my head. As soon as I saw the new cue ball roll I knew I was totally unprepared! Downhill from there and best forgotten.

Hu

BillyKoda
11-23-2006, 11:28 AM
Just a few weeks ago something similar happened to my team of 10 players on a road trip, yes all 10 of us were mentally challenged playing on the road in another state. We had about a 2 1/2 hour drive for a round robin tourney against a team we had never met and on tables we had never seen. Speedy cloth and tight pockets beat us more than any other factor. I saw it in the eyes of my players after about 15 minutes of playing, the tournament lasted for 10 hours and we got crushed.

The opponents were good but in my opinion not any better then our team, we got flustered. The rematch will happen next spring on our home field and I'm sure they will be just as flustered as we were.

We had a great day (other than pool playing) and the opponents were the best of hosts. A great time had by all.

JoeyA
11-23-2006, 01:16 PM
JoeyA,
No, not really. The pro was saying this with tongue in cheek to some degree. Everyone knows that strategy is definitely affected, not only by strength of the opponent, but also by the tightness of the pockets (yes, you are correct, even the pro's).

The point the pro was trying to make was to not let it get into your head (which in our match was definitely the case for me), and also to learn to shoot to a smaller, more precise target. In addition, this pro was also pointing out that the experts are less bothered about it than me. Sorry for the confusion (no William Faulkner here); perhaps I should sell my cue and take a writing class or two.

P.S. - I've seen you play, and you should be GIVING the weight to some of those pro's.

Wiliebetmore:
No wonder that Break-up character here on AZ is always riding herd on you. Thanks for the outing. LOL.

As to the pros being less bothered about the tighter pockets than the non-pros, it is simply a matter of their higher degree of precision. If you want to play consistently well on the tight pocket tables you must increase your precision in everything and that doesn't come easy nor is it easy to stay in the super precision mode for long periods of time.

Good luck with the tighter pockets. Thanksgiving dinner is over, I now feel like a turkey and so I will be looking for some over-sized pockets to spread some holiday cheer around.

And don't worry about your writing skills; they're just fine. It is my reading comprehension skills that are lacking.
Warm Regards,

JoeyA

JoeyA
11-23-2006, 01:27 PM
JoeyA,
No, not really. The pro was saying this with tongue in cheek to some degree. Everyone knows that strategy is definitely affected, not only by strength of the opponent, but also by the tightness of the pockets (yes, you are correct, even the pro's).

The point the pro was trying to make was to not let it get into your head (which in our match was definitely the case for me), and also to learn to shoot to a smaller, more precise target. In addition, this pro was also pointing out that the experts are less bothered about it than me. Sorry for the confusion (no William Faulkner here); perhaps I should sell my cue and take a writing class or two.

P.S. - I've seen you play, and you should be GIVING the weight to some of those pro's.

Wiliebetmore:
No wonder that Break-up character here on AZ is always riding herd on you. Thanks for the outing. LOL.

As to the pros being less bothered about the tighter pockets than the non-pros, it is simply a matter of their higher degree of precision. If you want to play consistently well on the tight pocket tables you must increase your precision in everything and that doesn't come easy nor is it easy to stay in the super precision mode for long periods of time.

Good luck with the tighter pockets. Thanksgiving dinner is over, I now feel like a turkey and so I will be looking for some over-sized pockets to spread some holiday cheer around.

And don't worry about your writing skills; they're just fine. It is my reading comprehension skills that are lacking.
Warm Regards,

JoeyA